34

On Python 3.5.0:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> cluster = namedtuple('Cluster', ['a', 'b'])
>>> c = cluster(a=4, b=9)
>>> c
Cluster(a=4, b=9)
>>> vars(c)
OrderedDict([('a', 4), ('b', 9)])

On Python 3.5.1:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> cluster = namedtuple('Cluster', ['a', 'b'])
>>> c = cluster(a=4, b=9)
>>> c
Cluster(a=4, b=9)
>>> vars(c)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: vars() argument must have __dict__ attribute

Seems like something about namedtuple changed (or maybe it was something about vars()?).

Was this intentional? Are we not supposed to use this pattern for converting named tuples into dictionaries anymore?

  • 1
    @user2357112 - Yeah, I think this kind of change should be called out in the changelog. That's what made me think at first that it might've been a mistake. – Nick Chammas Dec 8 '15 at 21:49
  • 4
    "Are we not supposed to use this pattern for converting named tuples into dictionaries anymore" I suppose we never were supposed to use this pattern, as vars(x) is documented to return x.__dict__, but I don't think it was ever documented that namedtuple instances have a __dict__ attribute. Such a pattern is documented for the Namespace instances in the argparse module, I know, so perhaps that's where the tendency arises. In any case, I'm sure there are going to be some surprised developers whose code breaks, so this is a great question. – jme Dec 8 '15 at 21:55
  • 3
    Fair enough. Also, I stand corrected that the use of vars() was never documented: in the Python 3.3 docs it states that the same effect can be achieved by using the built-in vars() function when referring to the functionality of _asdict(). – jme Dec 8 '15 at 22:26
  • 6
    @BlacklightShining That is indeed a convention in python, but this is an exception to the rule. The docs mentioned "to prevent conflicts with field names, the method and attribute names start with an underscore." – wim Dec 8 '15 at 22:45
  • 1
    @JeremyBanks arguably they did fix a bug. The bug allowed the first example to work, but breaks it in the second instance. Of course as jme mentioned, that bug was actually documented as a feature... – Wayne Werner Dec 9 '15 at 1:49
31

Per Python bug #24931:

[__dict__] disappeared because it was fundamentally broken in Python 3, so it had to be removed. Providing __dict__ broke subclassing and produced odd behaviors.

Revision that made the change

Specifically, subclasses without __slots__ defined would behave weirdly:

>>> Cluster = namedtuple('Cluster', 'x y')
>>> class Cluster2(Cluster):
    pass
>>> vars(Cluster(1,2))
OrderedDict([('x', 1), ('y', 2)])
>>> vars(Cluster2(1,2))
{}

Use ._asdict().

9

From the docs

Named tuple instances do not have per-instance dictionaries, so they are lightweight and require no more memory than regular tuples.

The docs (and help(namedtuple)) say to use c._asdict() to convert to a dict.

  • the interesting thing is that vars worked on python3.5.0 . . . – mgilson Dec 8 '15 at 21:43
  • The removal of the instance dict might have happened in 3.5.1 – Chad S. Dec 8 '15 at 21:44
  • Fair enough, that does seem to be the officially sanctioned way to do it. Shame is that much of the advice on this question recommending vars() is now incorrect. I wonder if this was intentional on the developers' part or just an accident. – Nick Chammas Dec 8 '15 at 21:45
  • vars() only works if the object has a __dict__ attribute. If namedtuples had this dict they would require more memory than regular tuples. This was determined to be undesirable. Therefore the __dict__ was removed, and thus vars() doesn't work. It is intended. – Chad S. Dec 8 '15 at 21:46
  • 1
    @ChadS. the __dict__ attribute was already just a property, namedtuples have __slots__. – jonrsharpe Dec 8 '15 at 21:47
7

__dict__ was implemented as a @property and has been removed; you can see the change in the source code:

3.5.0:

def __repr__(self):
    'Return a nicely formatted representation string'
    return self.__class__.__name__ + '({repr_fmt})' % self

@property
def __dict__(self):
    'A new OrderedDict mapping field names to their values'
    return OrderedDict(zip(self._fields, self))

def _asdict(self):
    'Return a new OrderedDict which maps field names to their values.'
    return self.__dict__

def __getnewargs__(self):
    'Return self as a plain tuple.  Used by copy and pickle.'
    return tuple(self)

def __getstate__(self):
    'Exclude the OrderedDict from pickling'
    return None

3.5.1:

def __repr__(self):
    'Return a nicely formatted representation string'
    return self.__class__.__name__ + '({repr_fmt})' % self

def _asdict(self):
    'Return a new OrderedDict which maps field names to their values.'
    return OrderedDict(zip(self._fields, self))

def __getnewargs__(self):
    'Return self as a plain tuple.  Used by copy and pickle.'
    return tuple(self)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.