3

I want method repeated to take a string and return an array of its repeated characters in the order they are repeated. Case sensitivity applies. In this example,

repeated("abba") # => ["b", "a"]

"b" is repeated before "a" is. Another example:

repeated("limbojackassin the garden") # => ["a", "s", "i", " ", "e", "n"]

works like this:

limbojackassin the garden 
      |--^                "a"
          |^              "s"
 |----------^             "i"
              |---^       " "
                    *     "a" ignored
                 |-----^  "e"
             |----------^ "n"

I have this method.

def repeated(str)
  puts str.chars.select{|i| str.count(i) > 1}.uniq
end

which works unexpectedly:

repeated("limbojackassin the garden")
# => ["i", "a", "s", "n", " ", "e"]
# => expected ["a", "s", "i", " ", "e", "n"]
repeated("Pippi")
# => ["i", "p"]
# => expected ["p", "i"]
repeated("apple")
# => as expected ["p"]

How could one check the distances between the array's item indexes?

  • 1
    In Pippi, lowercase i appears before lowercase p - the code has correctly returned ["i","p"] - why you think answer is wrong? Same with other examples as well - code is doing what it is supposed to do – Wand Maker Dec 9 '15 at 14:35
  • I think its the distance between the items,the pair pp comes before ii – owade Dec 9 '15 at 14:38
  • He means the character first repeated, this is, first character that appears twice. In "Pippi" p is first repeated. Demo: you find a 'P', next you find an 'i', then you find a 'p', then another 'p' so 'p' is the first repeated character, note that you haven't found the other 'i' yet. – Redithion Dec 9 '15 at 14:40
  • Looks like your problem statement is incomplete - unless you state that clearly and also code for it - you will not get right output from your code – Wand Maker Dec 9 '15 at 14:40
  • 1
    @owade I have posted a possible solution – Wand Maker Dec 9 '15 at 15:02
2

Another way using the index with Enumerable#each_with_index().

The select() rejects all first occurances of characters since index() returns the first occurance.

def repeated(str)
  puts str.chars.each_with_index
                .select { |c,i| i != str.index(c) }
                .map(&:first)
                .uniq
end

Alternativly to select() you can use reject { |c,i| i == str.index(c) }. Maybe it's more expressive.

Update: Insprired by Stefan's answer you can drop the map() method when using Enumerator#with_index() instead of Enumerable#each_with_index() since Ruby 1.9.

def repeated(str)
  p str.chars.reject
             .with_index { |c,i| i == str.index(c) }
             .uniq
end
  • It gives wrong answer for one of the test case – Wand Maker Dec 9 '15 at 15:11
  • Already fixed it. – sschmeck Dec 9 '15 at 15:12
  • Works fine now. Best answer! – Wand Maker Dec 9 '15 at 15:13
  • I had the same idea, but you accomplished it better. – Redithion Dec 9 '15 at 15:19
  • This one is pretty neat. – Drenmi Dec 9 '15 at 15:23
3
def repeated(str)
  puts(str.each_char.with_object([{}, []]) do
    |c, (h, a)| h[c] ? a.push(c) : h.store(c, true)
  end.last.uniq)
end
  • 1
    This is very complex to read – Wand Maker Dec 9 '15 at 15:20
  • I will stare at this answer in wonder tonight. :-P – Drenmi Dec 9 '15 at 15:20
  • 1
    The requirement to puts the output is making it difficult to read. Somehow, beginners tend to write a method that puts something rather than returning that value. – sawa Dec 9 '15 at 15:21
3

Here's a solution based on your code:

def repeated(str)
  str.each_char.select.with_index { |c, i| str[0, i].count(c) == 1 }
end

For each character, it counts the character in the substring before the character. If the count is 1, the character is select-ed.

As noted by Cary Swoveland, this creates and scans an intermediate string for each character. I'd use a variation of sawa's code if efficiency was important:

def repeated(str)
  h = Hash.new(0)
  str.each_char.with_object([]) do |c, a|
    a << c if h[c] == 1
    h[c] += 1
  end
end

This traverses the string via each_char and counts each character using a hash h. If a character is encountered a second time (count value is 1), it is added to an array a which is implicitly returned at the end by each_object.

I've just realized that you can use select instead of with_object:

def repeated(str)
  h = Hash.new(0)
  str.each_char.select { |c| (h[c] += 1) == 2 }
end
  • 1
    Clever, but not very efficient, considering that you create a lot of temporary arrays and keep counting for characters after two have been found. – Cary Swoveland Dec 10 '15 at 6:15
  • @CarySwoveland it creates temporary strings actually, but your point is valid. I've added another - more efficient - version. – Stefan Dec 10 '15 at 7:48
  • So that's what @sawa was doing. :-). I suggested something similar, but I prefer your revision as it's probably a bit faster. On the other hand, I don't have an array and append to it... – Cary Swoveland Dec 10 '15 at 7:54
  • 1
    @CarySwoveland I managed to get rid of the array ;-) – Stefan Dec 10 '15 at 8:56
2
str = "Jack be nimble, jack be quick, Jack jumped over the candle stick"

require 'set'

read1, read2 = Set.new, Set.new
str.each_char { |c| read2.add(c) unless read1.add?(c) }
read2.to_a
  #=> [" ", "b", "e", "a", "c", "k", "i", ",", "J", "j", "u", "m", "n", "d", "l", "t"]  

An attempt is made to add each character to read1. If the character can be added, it is the first time that character has been encountered. If the character cannot be added to read1 (because read1 already contains the character), an attempt is made to add it to read2. Whether read2 already contains that character is unimportant; all that matters is that read2 will contain that character after the attempt is made to add it.

Therefore, after all characters have been enumerated, read2 will contain the characters that appear more than once in the proper order.

Edit: I wish to thank @Stefan for pointing out that I did not need read2.include?(c) || following unless.

  • If I'm not mistaken, the call to read2.include?(c) is superfluous. – Stefan Dec 10 '15 at 8:19
  • Thanks, @Stefan. Even tighter! btw, my reaction when I see that conditional clause from you: :-D – Cary Swoveland Dec 10 '15 at 8:25
2

Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines!

require 'fruity'
require 'set'

def sschmeck(str)
  str.chars.each_with_index.select { |c,i| i != str.index(c) }.map(&:first).uniq
end

def drenmi(str)
  str.chars.each_with_object(Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = [] }).
      with_index { |(c, m), i| m[c] << i }.select { |_, v| v.length > 1 }.
      to_a.sort_by { |e| e[1][1] }.map(&:first)
end

def redithion(str)
    str.chars.map { |e|
        first_index = str.index(e)
        [first_index, str.index(e,first_index+1)]
    }.map{|e| e[1].nil? ? str.length + 1 : e[1]}
     .select{|e| e < str.length }.uniq.sort.map {|e| str[e]}
end

def sawa(str)
  str.each_char.with_object([{}, []]) do
    |c, (h, a)| h[c] ? a.push(c) : h.store(c, true)
  end.last.uniq
end

def stefan_1(str)
  str.each_char.select.with_index { |c, i| str[0, i].count(c) == 1 }
end

def stefan_2(str)
  h = Hash.new(0)
  str.each_char.with_object([]) do |c, a|
    a << c if h[c] == 1
    h[c] += 1
  end
end

def stefan_3(str)
  h = Hash.new(0)
  str.each_char.select { |c| (h[c] += 1) == 2 }
end

def cary(str)
  read1, read2 = Set.new, Set.new
  str.each_char { |c| read2.add(c) unless read1.add?(c) }
  read2.to_a
end

str = "Jack be nimble, jack be quick, Jack jumped over the candle stick"

compare(
  { sschmeck:   -> { sschmeck  str },
    drenmi:     -> { drenmi    str },
    redithion:  -> { redithion str },
    sawa:       -> { sawa      str },  
    stefan_1:   -> { stefan_1  str },  
    stefan_2:   -> { stefan_2  str },  
    stefan_3:   -> { stefan_3  str },  
    cary:       -> { cary      str }}
)

stefan_3 is faster than stefan_1 by 19.999999999999996% ± 10.0%
stefan_1 is similar to stefan_2
stefan_2 is faster than sawa by 10.000000000000009% ± 10.0%
sawa is similar to cary
cary is faster than sschmeck by 10.000000000000009% ± 10.0%
sschmeck is faster than drenmi by 39.99999999999999% ± 10.0%
drenmi is similar to redithion

For:

str = "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only."
str.size #=>613

we obtain:

Running each test 16 times. Test will take about 1 second.
stefan_3 is faster than sawa by 10.000000000000009% ± 10.0%
sawa is similar to stefan_2
stefan_2 is similar to drenmi
drenmi is similar to cary
cary is faster than sschmeck by 60.00000000000001% ± 1.0%
sschmeck is faster than stefan_1 by 19.999999999999996% ± 1.0%
stefan_1 is faster than redithion by 39.99999999999999% ± 10.0%

My takeaway is that the results are close enough that the choice of method should depend on other factors. I tested for readability with a stopwatch, stopping the timer when I thought, "Oh, I see." I won that, but of course I already understood what I was reading. stefan_3, which clocked 0.3 seconds, was next. I figured out sawa at 1:23:14.

  • Probably depends on string length, too. – Stefan Dec 10 '15 at 15:10
  • 1
    @Stefan, see my edit. – Cary Swoveland Dec 10 '15 at 17:36
0

I'm not sure if there's a trivial solution to this, but here's one that could serve as a starting point. It works by keeping a reference to the index of all occurrences of a character.

Example using the string "abba":

str = "abba"

char_map = str.chars.each_with_object(Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = [] }).with_index { |(c, m), i| m[c] << i }
#=> {"a"=>[0, 3], "b"=>[1, 2]} 

We now have a hash with each character as a key, and the indices of their occurrences as values. We can now filter out the non-duplicates, and sort the rest by their second occurrence:

char_map.select { |_, v| v.length > 1 }.to_a.sort_by { |e| e[1][1] }.map(&:first)
#=> ["b", "a"]

And the complete implementation:

def repeated(str)
  str.chars.each_with_object(Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = [] }).with_index { |(c, m), i| m[c] << i }.select { |_, v| v.length > 1 }.to_a.sort_by { |e| e[1][1] }.map(&:first)
end

repeated("abba")
#=> ["b", "a"]

repeated("Pippi")
#=> ["p", "i"]

repeated("limbojackassin the garden")
#=> ["a", "s", "i", " ", "e", "n"]
0

Code:

def repeated(str)
    return str.chars.map { |e|
        first_index = str.index(e)
        [first_index, str.index(e,first_index+1)]
    }.map{|e| e[1].nil? ? str.length + 1 : e[1]}
     .select{|e| e < str.length }.uniq.sort.map {|e| str[e]}
end

Example:

repeated('Pippi')
=> ["p", "i"]

Explanation:

It basically gets the two first indexes of each character, it removes the characters that weren't repeated (second index is null), then gets the second indexes, makes an uniq, sorts ascending and map those indexes to the corresponding character from the string.

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