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We have been going through some old code of ours and we have found some code that looks something like:

try
{
    $stmt = $db->prepare($query);
    $stmt->bindvalue(1, $id, PDO:ARAM_INT);
    $stmt->execute();
    $row = $stmt->fetchColumn();
}
catch(PDOException $e)
{
    echo "There was an issue with query: ";
    print_r($db->errorInfo());
}

Which at first glance we thought looked fine (Even many answers on Stack Exchange give this as example code). Then we looked at the PHP documentation for the errorInfo function and it states that:

PDO::errorInfo() only retrieves error information for operations performed directly on the database handle. If you create a PDOStatement object through PDO:repare() or PDO::query() and invoke an error on the statement handle, PDO::errorInfo() will not reflect the error from the statement handle

Which, if we understand it correctly, means that if anything goes wrong in any of the statement operations we do, we will not actually print out the error code we are expecting after "There was an issue with the query: ". Is this correct?

In light of this, we started looking for the proper way to do this, we started by looking at the PDOException class documentation which suggests that we might do something like:

try
{
    $stmt = $db->prepare($query);
    $stmt->bindvalue(1, $id, PDO:ARAM_INT);
    $stmt->execute();
    $row = $stmt->fetchColumn();
}
catch(PDOException $e)
{
    echo "There was an issue with query: ";
    print_r($e->errorInfo());
}

My questions are:

  1. Is the above way the proper way of doing this? If not, what IS the proper way of doing it?
  2. Is there any more useful information avaliable by using $db->errorInfo() and $db->errorCode ( or $stmt->errorInfo and $stmt->errorCode ) beyond what you can see from PDOException?
  3. If there IS anything more detailed available-and-useful from those detailed calls, then is there a way to differentiate, by examining the PDOException, whether it was thrown by PDO or by PDOStatement?
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The exception may be thrown by either $db->prepare or any of the $stmt operations. You do not know whence the error originated, so you should not guess. The exception itself contains all the information about what went wrong, so yes, consulting it and only it is the only sensible thing to do.

Moreover, it's usually nonsense to try..catch directly around the database call (unless you have a clear plan about something you want to do if this particular database operation fails). In your example, you're merely outputting the error and are continuing as if nothing happened. That's not sane error handling. Exceptions explicitly exist to abort and jump ship in case of a severe error, which means the part of your code which should actually be catching the exception should live several layers up and not have access to $db or $stmt at all (because it's in a different scope). Perhaps you should't be catching the exception at all and have it terminate your entire script (again, unless you expected an error to occur and have a clear plan how to handle it and how to recover your application into a known state). So looking only at the information in the exception itself is, again, the only sensible thing to do.

If there IS anything more detailed available-and-useful from those detailed calls, then is there a way to differentiate, by examining the PDOException, whether it was thrown by PDO or by PDOStatement?

This is only useful if, again, you have any sort of plan for recovery and that plan differs depending on where the error occurred. First of all, I doubt that, but if that's indeed the case, then you'd do something like this:

try {
    $stmt = $db->prepare($query);
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    // do something to save the day
}

try {
    $stmt->bindValue(...)
    ..
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    // save the day another way
}

In other words, you isolate the try..catch statements to smaller parts of your code that you want to distinguish. But, really... if $db->prepare failed, what are you going to do? You can't continue with the rest of the code either way. And what are you going to do differently than if a $stmt method failed? As one atomic unit, you were unable to query the database, period.

The PDOException::$code will give you the more detailed SQLState error code, which may tell you something useful (e.g. unique constraint violation), which is useful information to work with on occasion. But when inspecting that it's pretty irrelevant which specific line threw the error.

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