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I am currently searching for a very fast integer square root approximation, where floor(sqrt(x)) <= veryFastIntegerSquareRoot(x) <= x

The square root routine is used for calculating prime numbers, which get considerably faster if only values below or equals sqrt(x) are checked for being a divisor of x.

What I am currently having is this function from Wikipedia, adjusted a small bit to work with 64-bit integers.

Because I have no other function to compare against (or more precise, the function is too precise for my purposes, and it probably takes more time, than being higher than the actual result.)

  • 2
    Did you profile your code? If you're doing trial division, the sqrt operation is quite unlikely to be the bottleneck. – user2357112 Dec 9 '15 at 19:19
  • The jump-free Newton-Raphson converges in just four steps, IIRC. (for 32 bit ints) – wildplasser Dec 9 '15 at 19:24
  • @AntoineMathys: sqrt only has to be computed once, though. If you do i * i <= x, that's an extra multiplication every iteration. – user2357112 Dec 9 '15 at 19:29
  • the complexity still looks like O(n log n) or O(log n). Finding the prime numbers up to 10000000 takes roughly 40 seconds on a pi 2, while finding them up to 1000000 takes 2. – Morten Dec 9 '15 at 19:29
  • @AntoineMathys I just tested it out. I am assigning sqrt(x) to a variable (of course) and the loop for up to 10000000 (when the innermost loop is empty) takes 4 seconds as opposed to the constant re-evaluation of i*i, which takes over two minutes. – Morten Dec 9 '15 at 19:39
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Loopfree/jumpfree (well: almost ;-) Newton-Raphson:

/* static will allow inlining */
static unsigned usqrt4(unsigned val) {
    unsigned a, b;

    if (val < 2) return val; /* avoid div/0 */

    a = 1255;       /* starting point is relatively unimportant */

    b = val / a; a = (a+b) /2;
    b = val / a; a = (a+b) /2;
    b = val / a; a = (a+b) /2;
    b = val / a; a = (a+b) /2;

    return a;
}

For 64-bit ints you will need a few more steps (my guess: 6)

  • I remember a good way is to calculate inverse square root first. This solution may not perform well because of the division. I believe most machines still need 10-50 cycles to calculate a 32bit integer division. – user3528438 Dec 9 '15 at 22:58
  • Division speed may be a factor on some architectures. It is fast on x86, (for x >=3, it used to cost 20...60 clocks on 8086, IIRC). Avoiding loops and jumps, (keeping the insn pipeline full) should work on modern intel. – wildplasser Dec 9 '15 at 23:05
  • I just benchmarked, and the a = sqrt (0.0 +val); version is even a bit faster. Still needs an FPU or mmx, though. GCC emits sqrtsd %xmm0, %xmm1 – wildplasser Dec 9 '15 at 23:36
  • is the inaccuracy using floating point numbers guaranteed to be larger? I don't think so. – Morten Dec 10 '15 at 5:42
  • Your code has about double speed. Now testing x*isqrt(); The Inverse square root thingy has four times the speed. – Morten Dec 10 '15 at 5:51
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On modern PC hardware, computing the square root of n may well be faster using floating point arithmetics than any kind of fast integer math.

Note however that it may not be required at all: you can instead square the candidates and stop when the square exceeds the value of n. The dominant operation is the division anyway:

#define PBITS32  ((1<<2) | (1<<3) | (1<<5) | (1<<7) | (1<<11) | (1<<13) | \
                  (1UL<<17) | (1UL<<19) | (1UL<<23) | (1UL<<29) | (1UL<<31))

int isprime(unsigned int n) {
    if (n < 32)
        return (PBITS32 >> n) & 1;
    if ((n & 1) == 0)
        return 0;
    for (unsigned int p = 3; p * p <= n; p += 2) {
        if (n % p == 0)
            return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}
0

This version can be faster as DIV is slow and for small numbers (Val<20k) this version reduces the error to less than 5%. Tested on ARM M0 (With no DIV hardware acceleration)

static uint32_t usqrt4_6(uint32_t val) {
    uint32_t a, b;

    if (val < 2) return val; /* avoid div/0 */
    a = 1255;       /* starting point is relatively unimportant */
    b = val / a; a = (a + b)>>1;
    b = val / a; a = (a + b)>>1;
    b = val / a; a = (a + b)>>1;
    b = val / a; a = (a + b)>>1;
    if (val < 20000) {  
        b = val / a; a = (a + b)>>1;    // < 17% error Max
        b = val / a; a = (a + b)>>1;    // < 5%  error Max
    }
    return a;
}

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