3

This is my first ever attempt at programming with assembly. I'm using a 64 bit Mac OS. I'm also using NASM. I've done a lot of looking around for a solution, but I can't find anything that works for my machine.

Can anyone help me solve this problem? Here is the code and error, thanks!

hello.asm

    global start

    section .text
start:
    mov rax, 1
    mov rdi, 1
    mov rsi, message
    mov rdx, 13
    syscall
    mov eax, 60
    xor rdi, rdi
    syscall
message:
    db "Hello, World", 10  

my attempt at executing:

nasm -f macho64 hello.asm -o hello.o
ld -arch i386 -o hello hello.o
./hello

the error

ld: warning: -macosx_version_min not specified, assuming 10.10
ld: warning: ignoring file hello.o, file was built for unsupported file format ( 0xCF 0xFA 0xED 0xFE 0x07 0x00 0x00 0x01 0x03 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x01 0x00 0x00 0x00 ) which is not the architecture being linked (i386): hello.o
Undefined symbols for architecture i386:
  "_main", referenced from:
     implicit entry/start for main executable
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture i386
  • 2
    If you are targeting 64-bit code (executable), which clearly you are doing, remove -arch i386 from your LD command line. – Michael Petch Dec 9 '15 at 23:27
  • @MichaelPetch That worked, thanks! However, now I'm getting a Segmentation fault 11. Any idea how I can fix this? Thanks. – user3314993 Dec 9 '15 at 23:31
  • 1
    Your code is for linux but you are apparently on macos. – Jester Dec 9 '15 at 23:32
  • 1
    You seem to be using Linux syscalls on OS/X. The write syscall on OS/X in 64-bit code is 0x20000004 and exit syscall is 0x20000001 . In 32-bit code on OS/X you subtract 0x20000000 off each syscall (so they are 4 and 1 in 32-bit). – Michael Petch Dec 9 '15 at 23:34
  • Wow, I'm unbelievably confused. Thanks for solving my problem, though. If you post it as an answer, I'll accept it. – user3314993 Dec 9 '15 at 23:40
3

The reason for your linker error is that you created a 64-bit macho object using NASM, but then targeted i386 for the executable. What you likely were after was a 64-bit executable, which could be done by removing -arch like this:

ld -o hello hello.o

As for your segfault when running your program, it seems that you likely followed a tutorial that may have been designed for Linux. OS/X isn't base upon Linux, it derived from BSD so the Syscalls are different. We could tell you were using Linux Syscalls because syscall 1 is sys_write and sys_exit is rax = 60. This unfortunately isn't the same for OS/X. In 64-bit OS/X code sys_exit is rax=0x20000001 and sys_write is rax=0x20000004 .

Your code would have to be changed to:

    global start

    section .data
message: db "Hello, World", 10  

    section .text
start:
    mov rax, 0x20000004
    mov rdi, 1
    mov rsi, message
    mov rdx, 13
    syscall
    mov rax, 0x20000001
    xor rdi, rdi
    syscall

You'll also observe I explicitly declared a .data section and placed your variable in it. In some environments it may cause problems if data variables are placed in the code.

If creating 32-bit code on OS/X (you aren't in this case) the Syscalls have 0x20000000 subtracted from each. So in 32-bit OS/X code sys_exit is eax=0x1 and sys_write is eax=0x4 .

A reference for all the Syscalls (and their parameters) on OS/X can be found in this Apple information. Just add 0x20000000 to each number in the first column of the chart for 64-bit assembler code.

You probably want to find a 64-bit OS/X tutorial about Syscalls. This is a simple one

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.