16

This is just pseudocode:

macro_rules! attribute {
    $e: expr<f32> => { /* magical float stuff */ };
    $e: expr<i64> => { /* mystical int stuff */ };
};

I would like to have a differently expanded macro depending on the type that I passed to the macro.

This is how it would work in C++

template <typename T>
struct Attribute{ void operator(T)() {} };

template <>
struct Attribute<float> {
    void operator(float)(float) { /* magical float stuff */ }
};

template <>
struct Attribute<long> {
    void operator()(long) { /* mystical int stuff */ }
}
  • Macros only dispatch on syntax, traits OTOH can dispatch based on the type. Consider using a trait, or using a trait somehow inside your macro. – bluss Dec 11 '15 at 2:17
21

Rust macros aren't able to do that. Macros operate at the syntactic level, not at the semantic level. That means that although the compiler knows it has an expression (syntax), it doesn't know what the type of the expression's value (semantic) is at the moment the macro is expanded.

A workaround would be to pass the expected type to the macro:

macro_rules! attribute {
    ($e:expr, f32) => { /* magical float stuff */ };
    ($e:expr, i64) => { /* mystical int stuff */ };
}

fn main() {
    attribute!(2 + 2, i64);
}

Or, more simply, define multiple macros.


If you want to do static (compile-time) dispatch based on the type of an expression, you can use traits. Define a trait with the necessary methods, then implement the trait for the types you need. You can implement a trait for any type (including primitives and types from other libraries) if the impl block is in the same crate as the trait definition.

trait Attribute {
    fn process(&self);
}

impl Attribute for f32 {
    fn process(&self) { /* TODO */ }
}

impl Attribute for i64 {
    fn process(&self) { /* TODO */ }
}

macro_rules! attribute {
    ($e:expr) => { Attribute::process(&$e) };
}

fn main() {
    attribute!(2 + 2);
}

Note: You could also write $e.process() in the macro's body, but then the macro might call an unrelated process method.

  • 1
    so in this context rust macros are less powerful than c++ templates? – Arne Dec 11 '15 at 11:55
  • @Arne if that's the way you want to think of it, then sure. Rust macros and C++ templates are only comparable in broad strokes and have different capabilities. However, both languages give you the same ability here, as evidenced by the trait example. My biased opinion is that the Rust version is better as you don't need the metaprogramming of a template / macro at all — I'd probably leave off the macro and just call (2+2).attribute() in main. – Shepmaster Dec 11 '15 at 14:48
  • 2
    @Shepmaster I don't need, static or dynamic dispatch, I need the result of it at compile time. – Arne Dec 11 '15 at 17:06
4

As already explained, you cannot expand differently depending on the type of an expr. But as a workaround, you can use the any module and try to downcast from the Any trait:

use std::any::Any;

macro_rules! attribute {
    ( $e:expr ) => {
        if let Some(f) = (&$e as &Any).downcast_ref::<f32>() {
            println!("`{}` is f32.", f);
        } else if let Some(f) = (&$e as &Any).downcast_ref::<f64>() {
            println!("`{}` is f64.", f);
        } else {
            println!("I dunno what is `{:?}` :(", $e);
        }
    };
}

fn main() {
    attribute!(0f32);
    attribute!(0f64);
    attribute!(0);
}

Displays:

`0` is f32.
`0` is f64.
I dunno what is `0` :(
  • 2
    Note that this incurs runtime overhead unless the compiler is able to optimize it away. – jhpratt GOFUNDME RELICENSING Nov 18 '19 at 8:23

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