I am trying to assign a new value to a tensorflow variable in python.

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

x = tf.Variable(0)
init = tf.initialize_all_variables()
sess = tf.InteractiveSession()
sess.run(init)

print(x.eval())

x.assign(1)
print(x.eval())

But the output I get is

0
0

So the value has not changed. What am I missing?

up vote 98 down vote accepted

The statement x.assign(1) does not actually assign the value 1 to x, but rather creates a tf.Operation that you have to explicitly run to update the variable.* A call to Operation.run() or Session.run() can be used to run the operation:

assign_op = x.assign(1)
sess.run(assign_op)  # or `assign_op.op.run()`
print(x.eval())
# ==> 1

(* In fact, it returns a tf.Tensor, corresponding to the updated value of the variable, to make it easier to chain assignments.)

  • Thanks! assign_op.run() gives an error:AttributeError: 'Tensor' object has no attribute 'run'. But sess.run(assign_op) runs perfectly fine. – abora Dec 11 '15 at 10:53
  • In this example, is the data that the Variable x stored in memory before the assign operation / mutable tensor was run overwritten or is a new tensor created that stores the updated value? – dannygoldstein Jun 22 '16 at 4:53
  • 3
    The current implementation of assign() overwrites the existing value. – mrry Jun 22 '16 at 6:02
  • 1
    You have no idea how much this just helped me out! :) – Mike Gillett Dec 8 '16 at 5:38
  • Is there a way to assign a new value to a Variable without creating any additional operations in the graph? It seems that each variable has an Assign operation created for it already, but calling my_var.assign() or tf.assign() creates a new operation instead of using the existing one. – Nathan Dec 6 '17 at 3:34

You can also assign a new value to a tf.Variable without adding an operation to the graph: tf.Variable.load(value, session). This function can also save you adding placeholders when assigning a value from outside the graph and it is useful in case the graph is finalized.

import tensorflow as tf
x = tf.Variable(0)
sess = tf.Session()
sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
print(sess.run(x))  # Prints 0.
x.load(1, sess)
print(sess.run(x))  # Prints 1.
  • 2
    An underrated solution -- load avoids so many boilerplate. – P-Gn May 28 at 14:25
  • 2
    Caveat: you can't load it with array having different shape than the shape of initial value of the variable! – Rajarshee Mitra Jul 3 at 10:37

First of all you can assign values to variables/constants just by feeding values into them the same way you do it with placeholders. So this is perfectly legal to do:

import tensorflow as tf
x = tf.Variable(0)
with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
    print sess.run(x, feed_dict={x: 3})

Regarding your confusion with the tf.assign() operator. In TF nothing is executed before you run it inside of the session. So you always have to do something like this: op_name = tf.some_function_that_create_op(params) and then inside of the session you run sess.run(op_name). Using assign as an example you will do something like this:

import tensorflow as tf
x = tf.Variable(0)
y = tf.assign(x, 1)
with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
    print sess.run(x)
    print sess.run(y)
    print sess.run(x)
  • @RobinDinse, it does. In the above example, you get 0,1,1 as your stdout. – Rajarshee Mitra Jul 3 at 10:50
  • 2
    Note that feeding the value via the feed_dict does not permanently assign that value to the variable, but only for that particular run call. – Robin Dinse Jul 4 at 16:43
  • @RobinDinse how can I assign that value permanently? If you can, see my question here stackoverflow.com/questions/53141762/… – volperossa Nov 4 at 17:00

Also, it has to be noted that if you're using your_tensor.assign(), then the tf.global_variables_initializer need not be called explicitly since the assign operation does it for you in the background.

Example:

In [212]: w = tf.Variable(12)
In [213]: w_new = w.assign(34)

In [214]: with tf.Session() as sess:
     ...:     sess.run(w_new)
     ...:     print(w_new.eval())

# output
34 

However, this will not initialize all variables, but it will only initialize the variable on which assign was executed on.

There is an easier approach:

x = tf.Variable(0)
x = x + 1
print x.eval()
  • 2
    the o.p. was examining the usage of tf.assign, not addition. – vega Mar 26 '17 at 13:57

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