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In Ruby, what is the difference between == and ===? The RDoc says

Case Equality—For class Object, effectively the same as calling #==, but typically overridden by descendents to provide meaningful semantics in case statements.

Is #== the same as ==? And could you provide an example of when/how this is used in case statements?

124

The two really have nothing to do with each other. In particular, #== is the equality operator and #=== has absolutely nothing to with equality. Personally, I find it rather unfortunate that #=== looks so similar to #==, uses the equals sign and is often called the case equality operator, triple equals operator or threequals operator when it really has nothing to do with equality.

I call #=== the case subsumption operator (it's the best I could come up with, I'm open to suggestions, especially from native English speakers).

The best way to describe a === b is "if I have a drawer labeled a, does it make sense to put b in it?"

So, for example, Module#=== tests whether b.is_a?(a). If you have Integer === 2, does it make sense to put 2 in a box labeled Integer? Yes, it does. What about Integer === 'hello'? Obviously not.

Another example is Regexp#===. It tests for a match. Does it make sense to put 'hello' in a box labeled /el+/? Yes, it does.

For collections such as ranges, Range#=== is defined as a membership test: it makes sense to put an element in a box labeled with a collection if that element is in the collection.

So, that's what #=== does: it tests whether the argument can be subsumed under the receiver.

What does that have to with case expressions? Simple:

case foo
when bar
  baz
end

is the same as

if bar === foo
  baz
end
  • 4
    Array#=== is not defined as membership in ruby 1.8 or 1.9.1. Range#=== is though. – sepp2k Aug 6 '10 at 9:09
  • 1
    @sepp2k: You're right. That's what I get for assuming sensible semantics without checking the documentation first. – Jörg W Mittag Aug 6 '10 at 9:13
  • 10
    "if I have a drawer labeled a, does it make sense to put b in it?". Splendid image. – tokland Dec 16 '10 at 19:26
  • 1
    What's the etymology of this operator? Was it used like this in Perl or CLU, or something made up new by Matz? – Andrew Grimm Dec 17 '10 at 5:59
  • 9
    +1 for "subsumption" – the Tin Man Dec 17 '10 at 15:59
10

Yes, by #== the docs mean "the instance method == of the current object".

=== is used in case statements as such:

case obj
when x
  foo
when y
  bar
end

Is the same as

if x === obj
  foo
elsif y === obj
  bar
end

Some classes that define their own === are Range (to act like include?), Class (to act like obj.is_a?(klass)) and Regexp (to act like =~ except returning a boolean). Some classes that don't define their own === are the numeric classes and String.

So

case x
when 0
  puts "Lots"
when Numeric
  puts(100.0 / x)
when /^\d+$/
  puts(100.0 / x.to_f)
default
  raise ArgumentError, "x is not a number or numeric string"
end

is the same as

if 0 == x
  puts "Lots"
elsif x.is_a? Numeric
  puts(100.0 / x)
elsif x =~ /^\d+$/
  puts(100.0 / x.to_f)
else
  raise ArgumentError, "x is not a number or numeric string"
end
  • Curious if you were to put a string in the when statement, would it be similar to saying case x; when string --> if "string" == x? – the12 Nov 10 '16 at 5:38
  • 1
    @the12 Are you asking whether Ruby will automatically add quotes around an identifier or was that a typo? Anyway case x; when string is equivalent to if string === x, which, if string contains a string, is equivalent to if string == x. Likewise case x; when "string" is equivalent to if "string" === x and if "string" == x. – sepp2k Nov 10 '16 at 16:02
4

Fun fact, === is also used to match exceptions in rescue

Here is an example

class Example
  def self.===(exception)
    puts "Triple equals has been called."
    true
  end
end

raise rescue Example
# => prints "Triple equals has been called."
# => no exception raised

This is used to match system errors.

SystemCallError.=== has been defined to return true when the two have the same errno. With this system call errors with the same error number, such as Errno::EAGAIN and Errno::EWOULDBLOCK, can both be rescued by listing just one of them.

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