8

Assume we have a function f(x,y) and another function

def g():
       # ...
       f(i,j) # i,j vary and f is called multiple times
       # ...

We want to write a Unit test that checks whether f is called the number of times and with the right parameters.

def test_g():
      with patch('mymodule.f') as function:
          assert function.gacs.call_count == correct_no_calls

There is

function.assert_called_with(...)

but this only refers to the last call. So assuming g calls f(1,2) and then f(2,3), function.assert_called_with(1,2) is False.

Furthermore, there is

function.call_args_list

which yields a list of call objects with the right parameters. Comparing this list to call object that we create in the unit test feels like a very nasty thing to do. call seems like an internal class of the mock library.

Is there a better way to do this? I use this set-up to test parallel execution of an apply function.

10

Even @MartinPieters's answer is correct I think that is not the best way to do it. Mock provide assert_has_calls to do this kind of duties.

Your test could be:

function.assert_has_calls([mock.call(1, 2), mock.call(2, 3)])

Where mock.call is a helper class do to these kind of jobs.

Pay attention that is a has call and means the call list should be in the list of call and not equal. To solve it I usually define my own helper assert_is_calls() as follow

def assert_is_calls(m, calls, any_order=False):
   assert len(m.mock_calls) == len(calls)
   m.assert_has_calls(calls, any_order=any_order)

That a resume example

>>> import mock
>>> f = mock.Mock()
>>> f(1)
<Mock name='mock()' id='139836302999952'>
>>> f(2)
<Mock name='mock()' id='139836302999952'>
>>> f.assert_has_calls([mock.call(1), mock.call(2)])
>>> f.assert_has_calls([mock.call(2), mock.call(1)])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/home/damico/.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/mock/mock.py", line 969, in assert_has_calls
    ), cause)
  File "/home/damico/.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/six.py", line 718, in raise_from
    raise value
AssertionError: Calls not found.
Expected: [call(2), call(1)]
Actual: [call(1), call(2)]
>>> f.assert_has_calls([mock.call(2), mock.call(1)], any_order=True)
>>> f(3)
<Mock name='mock()' id='139836302999952'>
>>> f.assert_has_calls([mock.call(2), mock.call(1)], any_order=True)
>>> f.assert_has_calls([mock.call(1), mock.call(2)])
>>> assert len(f.mock_calls)==2
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError
>>> assert len(f.mock_calls)==3
>>> def assert_is_calls(m, calls, any_order=False):
...    assert len(m.mock_calls) == len(calls)
...    m.assert_has_calls(calls, any_order=any_order)
... 
>>> assert_is_calls(f, [mock.call(1), mock.call(2), mock.call(3)])
>>> assert_is_calls(f, [mock.call(1), mock.call(3), mock.call(2)])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in assert_is_calls
  File "/home/damico/.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/mock/mock.py", line 969, in assert_has_calls
    ), cause)
  File "/home/damico/.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/six.py", line 718, in raise_from
    raise value
AssertionError: Calls not found.
Expected: [call(1), call(3), call(2)]
Actual: [call(1), call(2), call(3)]
>>> assert_is_calls(f, [mock.call(1), mock.call(3), mock.call(2)], True)
>>> assert_is_calls(f, [mock.call(1), mock.call(3)], True)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in assert_is_calls
AssertionError
>>> 
  • assert_has_calls doesn't care about all calls. You can feed it a subset and it'll return true. If you want to assert that these were the only calls, then you need to use my approach. – Martijn Pieters Dec 15 '15 at 15:45
  • Your wrapper function, with any_order=False left as the default, effectively does the same thing as assertEquals(m.mock_calls, calls), so why the extra function? The function doesn't buy you anything extra.. – Martijn Pieters Dec 15 '15 at 15:47
  • @MartijnPieters Yes it is beacuse I mentioned my own helper assert_is_calls() to care about all calls.... I'm reading now your new comment: it's all about naming. It's make clear what you want to assert. Anyway you can chose exactly what you want to do, check the order or not, check exactly all calls or just a subset. – Michele d'Amico Dec 15 '15 at 15:50
  • @MartijnPieters Just one thing. The OP didn't say he wants to check exactly and in the right order (or I missed something?). So I covered all possibilities. – Michele d'Amico Dec 15 '15 at 15:54
4

Test if the Mock().mock_calls list is equal to a list of mock.call() objects you provide:

self.assertEquals(function.mock_calls, [
    mock.call(1, 2),
    mock.call(2, 3),
])

This gives you precise control, requiring both the order and the number of calls to match.

The mock.call() class is not internal, it is meant to be used for assertions like these.

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