6

Getting this error for the orderby in where clause. I did this because previously, if I didn't define 'people' I'd get an error on the return for people saying the name 'people' doesnt exist in this current context. How do I fix this?

 public JsonResult PersonsList(string birthyear)
 {
     TutorialDBContext db = new TutorialDBContext();
     var NumericYear = Convert.ToInt32(birthyear);
     IQueryable people;

     if (birthyear == "All")
     {
          people = from m in db.persons
                   select m;

          people = people.OrderByDescending(s => s.birthdate);
     }
     else
     {
          people = from m in db.persons
                   where m.birthdate.Year >= NumericYear
                   where m.birthdate.Year <= (NumericYear + 9)
                   select m;
     }

     return Json(people, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
 }
0

4 Answers 4

7

Because there is indeed no such method. There is one on that accepts an IQueryable<T> though. Use

IQueryable<Person> people;

or whatever element type would be appropriate.

6
  • The perils of being a noob. Thanks man, also its perons, not Person
    – tshoemake
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:12
  • Why have it as "perons"? If nothing else, capital letters for type names is more idiomatic in .Net.
    – Jon Hanna
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:23
  • Typo, meant "persons". I created the persons table in sql, and entity framework kept the casing. I agree on idiomatic part, this is just a sample project i'm hoping to help my new developer friends with.
    – tshoemake
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:25
  • 1
    I'd suggest changing the name of the entity to Person, and Persons (or People would be reasonable) for the name of the property that access them. The individual entity does after all presumably represent a single person. (If anything, a sample project for anyone's use other than just yourself should be more pernickety about such minor things, as samples should encourage good practices in those looking at them as much as possible).
    – Jon Hanna
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:44
  • 1
    No, I'd edit the EDMX file if one was used, or just adding the appropriate [Table] attribute otherwise, so that the table names are lowercase and plural but the C# class names are initial-capital and singular.
    – Jon Hanna
    Dec 11, 2015 at 16:24
5

OrderByDescending() is an extension method of IQueryable<T>, not of the non-generic IQueryable.

So you need to declare people as IQueryable<Person>.

6
  • @CodeCaster I didn't downvote, but OrderByDescending is also an extension method on IQueryable<T>, though that nit pick is not a reason for a downvote in my opinion.
    – D Stanley
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:06
  • 1
    I upvoted all answers. Now my question is also downvoted :x
    – tshoemake
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:10
  • @DStaney yes, really. I guess overload resolution will select the most derived one though, in this case indeed the IQueryable<T> one.
    – CodeCaster
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:11
  • 2
    @CodeCaster The variable is of type IQueryable<T>. When looking for OrderByEnumerable, the compiler will find the extension method of IQueryable<T> before the extension method of IEnumerable<T> because extension methods on the declared type will be chosen before extension methods on derived type(s).
    – D Stanley
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:14
  • @DStanley of course, you're right (in the comments under your answer as well). Thanks. Seems like I forgot about the existence of IQueryable<T> and its extension methods altogether...
    – CodeCaster
    Dec 11, 2015 at 15:19
2

As mentioned several times you'd need to declare people as an IQueryable<Person> or whatever the type returned from the People table is. If you want to use implicit typing you could rearrange your code as so:

var people = from m in db.persons
             select m;
if (birthyear == "All")
{
    people = people.OrderByDescending(s => s.birthdate);
}
else
{
     people = people.Where(p => p.birthdate.Year >= NumericYear
                             && p.birthdate.Year <= NumericYear + 9)
}
2
1
  1. You must have using System.Linq; at the begining of the code file.
  2. You should change IQueryable people; to IQueryable<Person> people;
  3. If you call this method with All as birthyear value you will get an exception when you reach var NumericYear = Convert.ToInt32(birthyear);
  4. I suggest to change the whole function to this

    public JsonResult PersonsList(string birthyear)
    {
        using (var db = new TutorialDBContext())
        {
            IQueryable<Person> people;
    
            if (birthyear == "All")
            {
                people = db.persons.OrderByDescending(s => s.birthdate);
            }
            else
            {
                var NumericYear = Convert.ToInt32(birthyear);
                people = from m in db.persons
                    where m.birthdate.Year >= NumericYear
                    where m.birthdate.Year <= (NumericYear + 9)
                    select m;
            }
    
            return Json(people, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }
    }
    

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