49

I found an example for en/decoding strings in PHP. At first it looks very good but it wont work :-(

Does anyone know what the problem is?

$Pass = "Passwort";
$Clear = "Klartext";

$crypted = fnEncrypt($Clear, $Pass);
echo "Encrypted: ".$crypted."</br>";

$newClear = fnDecrypt($crypted, $Pass);
echo "Decrypted: ".$newClear."</br>";

function fnEncrypt($sValue, $sSecretKey) {
    return trim(base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $sSecretKey, $sDecrypted, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB, mcrypt_create_iv(mcrypt_get_iv_size(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB), MCRYPT_RAND))));
}

function fnDecrypt($sValue, $sSecretKey) {
    return trim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $sSecretKey, base64_decode($sEncrypted), MCRYPT_MODE_ECB, mcrypt_create_iv(mcrypt_get_iv_size(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB), MCRYPT_RAND)));
}

The result is:

Encrypted: boKRNTYYNp7AiOvY1CidqsAn9wX4ufz/D9XrpjAOPk8=

Decrypted: —‚(ÑÁ ^ yË~F'¸®Ó–í œð2Á_B‰Â—

10 Answers 10

56

$sDecrypted and $sEncrypted were undefined in your code. See a solution that works (but is not secure!):


STOP!

This example is insecure! Do not use it!


$Pass = "Passwort";
$Clear = "Klartext";        

$crypted = fnEncrypt($Clear, $Pass);
echo "Encrypred: ".$crypted."</br>";

$newClear = fnDecrypt($crypted, $Pass);
echo "Decrypred: ".$newClear."</br>";        

function fnEncrypt($sValue, $sSecretKey)
{
    return rtrim(
        base64_encode(
            mcrypt_encrypt(
                MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256,
                $sSecretKey, $sValue, 
                MCRYPT_MODE_ECB, 
                mcrypt_create_iv(
                    mcrypt_get_iv_size(
                        MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, 
                        MCRYPT_MODE_ECB
                    ), 
                    MCRYPT_RAND)
                )
            ), "\0"
        );
}

function fnDecrypt($sValue, $sSecretKey)
{
    return rtrim(
        mcrypt_decrypt(
            MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, 
            $sSecretKey, 
            base64_decode($sValue), 
            MCRYPT_MODE_ECB,
            mcrypt_create_iv(
                mcrypt_get_iv_size(
                    MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256,
                    MCRYPT_MODE_ECB
                ), 
                MCRYPT_RAND
            )
        ), "\0"
    );
}

But there are other problems in this code which make it insecure, in particular the use of ECB (which is not an encryption mode, only a building block on top of which encryption modes can be defined). See Fab Sa's answer for a quick fix of the worst problems and Scott's answer for how to do this right.

| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    I was using this code, and I found a bug. The trim should NOT be used!!! it should be a rtrim() with a second parameter "\0". In rare cases the first or last character of the encrypted value could be a space or return, the decryption goes wrong... – Paul Jacobse May 23 '12 at 11:07
  • 3
    Could you obfuscate that anymore please? I'm afraid I can, with some effort, still read what your code does. </sarcasm mode> Code should be self-descriptive. Give things like the output of mcrypt_get_iv_size an appropriate variable name and then use it. This kind of indentation is hard to read. Unless you're used to Lisp, maybe, but most PHP programmers aren't I'd say. I'm not saying the OP's (question asker's) code was any better, but as a good answer you might improve the code too. – Luc Sep 16 '13 at 19:36
  • 5
    -1 for ECB. See the Wikipedia entry for details on why it's a poor choice of block cipher mode. – Polynomial Mar 16 '14 at 1:26
  • 9
    -1: Passing different IVs in the encrypt and decrypt functions makes no sense at all. The only reason why this works is because the ECB mode does not use an initialization vector at all, so any value would do and produce the same output. – Clément May 3 '14 at 14:44
  • 4
    I don't know why this answer is so up voted. Just because 'it works' it doesn't mean it secured and should be used on production environments. MCRYPT_MODE_ECB use is highly descurged and even PHP mcrypt_ecb function has been DEPRECATED as of PHP 5.5.0. Relying on this function is highly discouraged. Instead you should use MCRYPT_MODE_CBC mode: wpy.me/blog/15-encrypt-and-decrypt-data-in-php-using-aes-256 – wappy Feb 27 '15 at 15:04
80
+300

Please use an existing secure PHP encryption library

It's generally a bad idea to write your own cryptography unless you have experience breaking other peoples' cryptography implementations.

None of the examples here authenticate the ciphertext, which leaves them vulnerable to bit-rewriting attacks.

If you can install PECL extensions, libsodium is even better

<?php
// PECL libsodium 0.2.1 and newer

/**
 * Encrypt a message
 * 
 * @param string $message - message to encrypt
 * @param string $key - encryption key
 * @return string
 */
function safeEncrypt($message, $key)
{
    $nonce = \Sodium\randombytes_buf(
        \Sodium\CRYPTO_SECRETBOX_NONCEBYTES
    );

    return base64_encode(
        $nonce.
        \Sodium\crypto_secretbox(
            $message,
            $nonce,
            $key
        )
    );
}

/**
 * Decrypt a message
 * 
 * @param string $encrypted - message encrypted with safeEncrypt()
 * @param string $key - encryption key
 * @return string
 */
function safeDecrypt($encrypted, $key)
{   
    $decoded = base64_decode($encrypted);
    $nonce = mb_substr($decoded, 0, \Sodium\CRYPTO_SECRETBOX_NONCEBYTES, '8bit');
    $ciphertext = mb_substr($decoded, \Sodium\CRYPTO_SECRETBOX_NONCEBYTES, null, '8bit');

    return \Sodium\crypto_secretbox_open(
        $ciphertext,
        $nonce,
        $key
    );
}    

Then to test it out:

<?php
// This refers to the previous code block.
require "safeCrypto.php"; 

// Do this once then store it somehow:
$key = \Sodium\randombytes_buf(\Sodium\CRYPTO_SECRETBOX_KEYBYTES);
$message = 'We are all living in a yellow submarine';

$ciphertext = safeEncrypt($message, $key);
$plaintext = safeDecrypt($ciphertext, $key);

var_dump($ciphertext);
var_dump($plaintext);

This can be used in any situation where you are passing data to the client (e.g. encrypted cookies for sessions without server-side storage, encrypted URL parameters, etc.) with a reasonably high degree of certainty that the end user cannot decipher or reliably tamper with it.

Since libsodium is cross-platform, this also makes it easier to communicate with PHP from, e.g. Java applets or native mobile apps.


Note: If you specifically need to add encrypted cookies powered by libsodium to your app, my employer Paragon Initiative Enterprises is developing a library called Halite that does all of this for you.

| improve this answer | |
  • the library you provided, returns encrypted message in binary format - correct? Is it possible to return in a simple string format? Thanks – Andrew Dec 28 '15 at 15:32
  • A C# .NET port is available in this GitHub repo, in case anyone needs it : github.com/mayerwin/SaferCrypto. Thank you @ScottArciszewski. – Erwin Mayer Jan 3 '17 at 4:23
  • No @Andrew, it returns the message with base64 encoding, which is a simple string – Riking Jul 12 '17 at 22:13
52

If you don't want to use a heavy dependency for something solvable in 15 lines of code, use the built in OpenSSL functions. Most PHP installations come with OpenSSL, which provides fast, compatible and secure AES encryption in PHP. Well, it's secure as long as you're following the best practices.

The following code:

  • uses AES256 in CBC mode
  • is compatible with other AES implementations, but not mcrypt, since mcrypt uses PKCS#5 instead of PKCS#7.
  • generates a key from the provided password using SHA256
  • generates a hmac hash of the encrypted data for integrity check
  • generates a random IV for each message
  • prepends the IV (16 bytes) and the hash (32 bytes) to the ciphertext
  • should be pretty secure

IV is a public information and needs to be random for each message. The hash ensures that the data hasn't been tampered with.

function encrypt($plaintext, $password) {
    $method = "AES-256-CBC";
    $key = hash('sha256', $password, true);
    $iv = openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(16);

    $ciphertext = openssl_encrypt($plaintext, $method, $key, OPENSSL_RAW_DATA, $iv);
    $hash = hash_hmac('sha256', $ciphertext . $iv, $key, true);

    return $iv . $hash . $ciphertext;
}

function decrypt($ivHashCiphertext, $password) {
    $method = "AES-256-CBC";
    $iv = substr($ivHashCiphertext, 0, 16);
    $hash = substr($ivHashCiphertext, 16, 32);
    $ciphertext = substr($ivHashCiphertext, 48);
    $key = hash('sha256', $password, true);

    if (!hash_equals(hash_hmac('sha256', $ciphertext . $iv, $key, true), $hash)) return null;

    return openssl_decrypt($ciphertext, $method, $key, OPENSSL_RAW_DATA, $iv);
}

Usage:

$encrypted = encrypt('Plaintext string.', 'password'); // this yields a binary string

echo decrypt($encrypted, 'password');
// decrypt($encrypted, 'wrong password') === null

edit: Updated to use hash_equals and added IV to the hash.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    It's not a good practice to compare hashes using the equality operator, You should use hash_equals() instead, as it's vulnerable to the timing attack, more information here – Shahin Mar 25 '19 at 22:13
  • 1
    This answer is almost there, but needs... 1) A better KDF, SHA-256 is a very poor KDF. Use PBKDF2 at the very least, but Argon2/bcrypt would be better. 2) The IV needs to be included in the HMAC - the point of an HMAC is to ensure decryption will either result in the plaintext or fail - not including the IV gives rise to a situation where the user thinks they're getting the original plaintext, but aren't. 3) Use a time safe comparison when comparing the hashes, otherwise this code could be vulnerable to timing attacks. 4) Don't use the same key for HMAC as you do for AES. – Luke Joshua Park Jul 4 '19 at 20:59
  • 1
    @LukeJoshuaPark: about your point (1): why do you think one should use e.g. PBKDF2 or argon2? I think we can assume that the key is secure and sha-256 here is not about key derivation but converting string input into binary 256 bit output. It's not like output of SHA-256 is leaked to encrypted output as plaintext so where's the problem here? – Mikko Rantalainen Apr 2 at 6:36
  • 1
    @MikkoRantalainen We can't assume the key is secure, specifically because it isn't a key, it's a human-selected, low-entropy password. If we use SHA-256 to derive our encryption key, which takes a very negligible amount of time, brute force attacks on passwords are quite easy. However, if we use PBKDF2 or Argon2, where we can fine-tune the time it takes to derive a password (think a few hundred milliseconds), brute forcing becomes far less feasible. Pretty much the exact same reason we wouldn't use SHA-256 as a password hash. – Luke Joshua Park Apr 2 at 10:13
  • 1
    @LukeJoshuaPark: OK, I assumed that the developer would understand encryption requirements and use a key with equivalent amount of entropy to encryption used. If one uses keys such as output of openssl rand -hex 32 there's no need to avoid SHA-256 in the above code. – Mikko Rantalainen Apr 2 at 13:00
27

For information MCRYPT_MODE_ECB doesn't use the IV (initialization vector). ECB mode divide your message into blocks and each block is encrypted separately. I really don't recommended it.

CBC mode use the IV to make each message unique. CBC is recommended and should be used instead of ECB.

Example :

<?php
$password = "myPassword_!";
$messageClear = "Secret message";

// 32 byte binary blob
$aes256Key = hash("SHA256", $password, true);

// for good entropy (for MCRYPT_RAND)
srand((double) microtime() * 1000000);
// generate random iv
$iv = mcrypt_create_iv(mcrypt_get_iv_size(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, MCRYPT_MODE_CBC), MCRYPT_RAND);


$crypted = fnEncrypt($messageClear, $aes256Key);

$newClear = fnDecrypt($crypted, $aes256Key);

echo
"IV:        <code>".$iv."</code><br/>".
"Encrypred: <code>".$crypted."</code><br/>".
"Decrypred: <code>".$newClear."</code><br/>";

function fnEncrypt($sValue, $sSecretKey) {
    global $iv;
    return rtrim(base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $sSecretKey, $sValue, MCRYPT_MODE_CBC, $iv)), "\0\3");
}

function fnDecrypt($sValue, $sSecretKey) {
    global $iv;
    return rtrim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $sSecretKey, base64_decode($sValue), MCRYPT_MODE_CBC, $iv), "\0\3");
}

You have to stock the IV to decode each message (IV are not secret). Each message is unique because each message has an unique IV.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You should add an example to clearify the usage of aes256Key. This example shows how to use it: php.net/manual/fr/book.mcrypt.php#107483 – mgutt Mar 17 '13 at 16:15
  • 1
    It's pretty the same but my example doesn't use salt for clarity. – Fabien Sa Mar 20 '13 at 9:10
  • 2
    +1. The top answer generates random IVs to feed a system (ECB) that doesn't need any. – Clément May 3 '14 at 14:47
  • If I have understood it properly, the $password = "myPassword_!" becomes part of the encryption algorithm, right? – user3746998 Jul 2 '14 at 15:34
  • 4
    Be warned that the code above does not use AES nor does it use PKCS#7 padding, which means it will be incompatible with any other system out there. I'm the guy that fixed that example code for mcrypt_encrypt. – Maarten Bodewes Dec 17 '14 at 15:25
2

Few important things to note with AES encryption:

  1. Never use plain text as encryption key. Always hash the plain text key and then use for encryption.
  2. Always use Random IV (initialization vector) for encryption and decryption. True randomization is important.
  3. As mentioned above, don't use mode, use CBC instead.
| improve this answer | |
  • It isn't enough just to hash a password to use as an encryption key, see comments on blade's answer. – Luke Joshua Park Apr 5 at 3:05
2

This is a working solution of AES encryption - implemented using openssl. It uses the Cipher Block Chaining Mode (CBC-Mode). Thus, alongside data and key, you can specify iv and block size

 <?php
      class AESEncryption {

            protected $key;
            protected $data;
            protected $method;
            protected $iv;

            /**
             * Available OPENSSL_RAW_DATA | OPENSSL_ZERO_PADDING
             *
             * @var type $options
             */
            protected $options = 0;

            /**
             * 
             * @param type $data
             * @param type $key
             * @param type $iv
             * @param type $blockSize
             * @param type $mode
             */
            public function __construct($data = null, $key = null, $iv = null, $blockSize = null, $mode = 'CBC') {
                $this->setData($data);
                $this->setKey($key);
                $this->setInitializationVector($iv);
                $this->setMethod($blockSize, $mode);
            }

            /**
             * 
             * @param type $data
             */
            public function setData($data) {
                $this->data = $data;
            }

            /**
             * 
             * @param type $key
             */
            public function setKey($key) {
                $this->key = $key;
            }

            /**
             * CBC 128 192 256 
              CBC-HMAC-SHA1 128 256
              CBC-HMAC-SHA256 128 256
              CFB 128 192 256
              CFB1 128 192 256
              CFB8 128 192 256
              CTR 128 192 256
              ECB 128 192 256
              OFB 128 192 256
              XTS 128 256
             * @param type $blockSize
             * @param type $mode
             */
            public function setMethod($blockSize, $mode = 'CBC') {
                if($blockSize==192 && in_array('', array('CBC-HMAC-SHA1','CBC-HMAC-SHA256','XTS'))){
                    $this->method=null;
                    throw new Exception('Invalid block size and mode combination!');
                }
                $this->method = 'AES-' . $blockSize . '-' . $mode;
            }

            /**
             * 
             * @param type $data
             */
            public function setInitializationVector($iv) {
                $this->iv = $iv;
            }

            /**
             * 
             * @return boolean
             */
            public function validateParams() {
                if ($this->data != null &&
                        $this->method != null ) {
                    return true;
                } else {
                    return FALSE;
                }
            }

            //it must be the same when you encrypt and decrypt
            protected function getIV() { 
                return $this->iv;
            }

             /**
             * @return type
             * @throws Exception
             */
            public function encrypt() {
                if ($this->validateParams()) { 
                    return trim(openssl_encrypt($this->data, $this->method, $this->key, $this->options,$this->getIV()));
                } else {
                    throw new Exception('Invalid params!');
                }
            }

            /**
             * 
             * @return type
             * @throws Exception
             */
            public function decrypt() {
                if ($this->validateParams()) {
                   $ret=openssl_decrypt($this->data, $this->method, $this->key, $this->options,$this->getIV());

                   return   trim($ret); 
                } else {
                    throw new Exception('Invalid params!');
                }
            }

        }

Sample usage:

<?php
        $data = json_encode(['first_name'=>'Dunsin','last_name'=>'Olubobokun','country'=>'Nigeria']);
        $inputKey = "W92ZB837943A711B98D35E799DFE3Z18";
        $iv = "tuqZQhKP48e8Piuc";
        $blockSize = 256;
        $aes = new AESEncryption($data, $inputKey, $iv, $blockSize);
        $enc = $aes->encrypt();
        $aes->setData($enc);
        $dec=$aes->decrypt();
        echo "After encryption: ".$enc."<br/>";
        echo "After decryption: ".$dec."<br/>";
| improve this answer | |
  • This code leaves IV handling to the user (who *will do it poorly) and also doesn't include any integrity checks. Not good crypto code. – Luke Joshua Park Jul 4 '19 at 21:01
1

If you are using MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128, try rtrim($output, "\0\3"). If the length of the string is less than 16, the decrypt function will return a string with length of 16 characters, adding 03 at the end.

You can easily check this, e.g. by trying:

$string = "TheString";
$decrypted_string = decrypt_function($stirng, $key);

echo bin2hex($decrypted_string)."=".bin2hex("TheString");
| improve this answer | |
  • Using MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128 this worked for me: rtrim($output, "\x00..\x1F") – Sergio Viudes Jul 16 '14 at 15:30
1

These are compact methods to encrypt / decrypt strings with PHP using AES256 CBC:

function encryptString($plaintext, $password, $encoding = null) {
    $iv = openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(16);
    $ciphertext = openssl_encrypt($plaintext, "AES-256-CBC", hash('sha256', $password, true), OPENSSL_RAW_DATA, $iv);
    $hmac = hash_hmac('sha256', $ciphertext.$iv, hash('sha256', $password, true), true);
    return $encoding == "hex" ? bin2hex($iv.$hmac.$ciphertext) : ($encoding == "base64" ? base64_encode($iv.$hmac.$ciphertext) : $iv.$hmac.$ciphertext);
}

function decryptString($ciphertext, $password, $encoding = null) {
    $ciphertext = $encoding == "hex" ? hex2bin($ciphertext) : ($encoding == "base64" ? base64_decode($ciphertext) : $ciphertext);
    if (!hash_equals(hash_hmac('sha256', substr($ciphertext, 48).substr($ciphertext, 0, 16), hash('sha256', $password, true), true), substr($ciphertext, 16, 32))) return null;
    return openssl_decrypt(substr($ciphertext, 48), "AES-256-CBC", hash('sha256', $password, true), OPENSSL_RAW_DATA, substr($ciphertext, 0, 16));
}

Usage:

$enc = encryptString("mysecretText", "myPassword");
$dec = decryptString($enc, "myPassword");
| improve this answer | |
  • I found that this worked, while the others above produced strange characters and didn't decrypt to anything legible. – WilliamK Jul 22 at 7:54
  • I am finding that this works intermittently. Each time it encrypts it produces a different answer. Sometimes it does not decrypt. – WilliamK Jul 22 at 8:37
  • Try this: encryptString("mysecretText", "myPassword", "hex") | decryptString($enc, "myPassword", "hex") @WilliamK – Marco Concas Aug 26 at 22:31
0

If you are using PHP >= 7.2 consider using inbuilt sodium core extension for encrption.

Find more information here - http://php.net/manual/en/intro.sodium.php.

| improve this answer | |
0

Here's an improved version based on code written by blade

  • add comments
  • overwrite arguments before throwing to avoid leaking secrets with the exception
  • check return values from openssl and hmac functions

The code:

class Crypto
{
    /**
     * Encrypt data using OpenSSL (AES-256-CBC)
     * @param string $plaindata Data to be encrypted
     * @param string $cryptokey key for encryption (with 256 bit of entropy)
     * @param string $hashkey key for hashing (with 256 bit of entropy)
     * @return string IV+Hash+Encrypted as raw binary string. The first 16
     *     bytes is IV, next 32 bytes is HMAC-SHA256 and the rest is
     *     $plaindata as encrypted.
     * @throws Exception on internal error
     *
     * Based on code from: https://stackoverflow.com/a/46872528
     */
    public static function encrypt($plaindata, $cryptokey, $hashkey)
    {
        $method = "AES-256-CBC";
        $key = hash('sha256', $cryptokey, true);
        $iv = openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(16);

        $cipherdata = openssl_encrypt($plaindata, $method, $key, OPENSSL_RAW_DATA, $iv);

        if ($cipherdata === false)
        {
            $cryptokey = "**REMOVED**";
            $hashkey = "**REMOVED**";
            throw new \Exception("Internal error: openssl_encrypt() failed:".openssl_error_string());
        }

        $hash = hash_hmac('sha256', $cipherdata.$iv, $hashkey, true);

        if ($hash === false)
        {
            $cryptokey = "**REMOVED**";
            $hashkey = "**REMOVED**";
            throw new \Exception("Internal error: hash_hmac() failed");
        }

        return $iv.$hash.$cipherdata;
    }

    /**
    * Decrypt data using OpenSSL (AES-256-CBC)
     * @param string $encrypteddata IV+Hash+Encrypted as raw binary string
     *     where the first 16 bytes is IV, next 32 bytes is HMAC-SHA256 and
     *     the rest is encrypted payload.
     * @param string $cryptokey key for decryption (with 256 bit of entropy)
     * @param string $hashkey key for hashing (with 256 bit of entropy)
     * @return string Decrypted data
     * @throws Exception on internal error
     *
     * Based on code from: https://stackoverflow.com/a/46872528
     */
    public static function decrypt($encrypteddata, $cryptokey, $hashkey)
    {
        $method = "AES-256-CBC";
        $key = hash('sha256', $cryptokey, true);
        $iv = substr($encrypteddata, 0, 16);
        $hash = substr($encrypteddata, 16, 32);
        $cipherdata = substr($encrypteddata, 48);

        if (!hash_equals(hash_hmac('sha256', $cipherdata.$iv, $hashkey, true), $hash))
        {
            $cryptokey = "**REMOVED**";
            $hashkey = "**REMOVED**";
            throw new \Exception("Internal error: Hash verification failed");
        }

        $plaindata = openssl_decrypt($cipherdata, $method, $key, OPENSSL_RAW_DATA, $iv);

        if ($plaindata === false)
        {
            $cryptokey = "**REMOVED**";
            $hashkey = "**REMOVED**";
            throw new \Exception("Internal error: openssl_decrypt() failed:".openssl_error_string());
        }

        return $plaindata;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice edits, looks good! The one thing, like we previously discussed, is that this is vulnerable to brute-force through lookup tables because we trust the user to provide a "cryptokey" that has sufficient entropy. This problem could be fixed with a real KDF rather than SHA-256. Otherwise, looks good! – Luke Joshua Park Apr 6 at 7:18
  • @LukeJoshuaPark: Yeah, I think these methods would be the low level implementation using a real key. Perhaps I should add a method for using Key derivation function (KDF) to go from user password to encryption key. However, such method should not claim to magically have 256 bit of entropy from low quality user password. Instead, KDF logically is an injection from e.g. 32 bit key to 256 bit keyspace where attacker does not have an easy way to simply enumerate all the 2^32 possible keys out of 256 bit keyspace. – Mikko Rantalainen Apr 6 at 9:44
  • Assuming that we have only password (=no storage for salt), the KDF would need to be something like hash_pbkdf2("sha256", $password, $password, 500000). I'm not sure if even that's enough with low quality passwords when we consider SHA-256 performance on GPUs. – Mikko Rantalainen Apr 6 at 9:57
  • @LukeJoshuaPark do you think it would be okay to generate hash key and encryption key from the same password? For example $hash_key = hash_pbkdf2("sha256", "$password", "hash$password", 500000) and $encryption_key = hash_pbkdf2("sha256", $password, "enc$password", 500000). – Mikko Rantalainen Apr 6 at 10:03
  • 1
    Yes - although I'd recommend running PBKDF2 with SHA-512 rather than SHA-256 if you're going to do that. This allows the first 256 bits of output to be the encryption key and the last 256 bits of output to be the hash key. – Luke Joshua Park Apr 6 at 23:25

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