14

Context/Objective:

In windows 7, I'm developing a batch script using regular windows commands. Within this batch, I need to save the current directory first thing so it can be restored when the script finishes running.

What I have tried so for:

I've attempted to use commands of chdir, pushd and popd to make it work.

  • Try 1:

    PUSHD CHDIR

    REM main script body

    POPD

    Result: error on PUSHD line "the system cannot find the path specified"

  • Try 2:

    SET curdir=CHDIR

    PUSHD %curdir%

    REM main script body

    POPD

    Result: same error on PUSHD line "the system cannot find the path specified"

  • Other tries: Also googling didn't yield any satisfactory results.

The Questions:

Can I make it work using these commands? Or is there another set of commands that I need to use?

Note:I'm looking for a solution using windows native commands only, third party tools or powershell is not an option.

1
  • pushd most likely fails because it can't find the directory that you provided as an argument.
    – CristiFati
    Commented Dec 11, 2015 at 16:16

3 Answers 3

17

You can use . to represent the current diretory.

Try this:

PUSHD .

REM The rest of you script

POPD
2
  • 2
    Thank you for this. The official documentation at learn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/administration/… states that the Path argument is optional, and is described as Specifies the directory to make the current directory, meaning that it doesn't affect how the directory stack is manipulated, meaning pushd would be the same as pushd .. But this is false. The documentation is unclear and/or wrong.
    – cowlinator
    Commented Apr 5, 2019 at 23:24
  • 1
    PUSHD combines pushing the current directory onto the stack and changing to the specified directory, all in one operation. So I consider this the more correct answer. Commented May 24, 2021 at 21:43
4

Your problem is that you need to use the CD command (instead of CHDIR) and don't forget to wrap it in %'s.. It is common to think they are they same, but they do differ, slightly, in this way.

Try the following example in a batch file:

@echo off

echo Initial directory set to:
cd "%UserProfile%\Desktop"
echo   `%cd%`
echo.

pushd %CD%

echo Changing to %AppData%
REM main script body
cd /D %AppData%
echo   `%cd%`
echo.

echo Changing to %LocalAppData%
cd /D %LocalAppData%
echo   `%cd%`
echo.

echo.
echo About to POPD
pause
POPD
echo   `%cd%`
echo.

I should note the @aphoria's answer is just as valid.

1
  • 1
    Minor nitpick...you are not using the CD command, but rather the CD environment variable, which is referenced by wrapping it in % characters (%CD%).
    – aphoria
    Commented Dec 11, 2015 at 17:33
4

Working solutions by both @aphoria and @wasatchwizard. Wish I could mark both as answers. Thank you both!

I'm consolidating them into one for those who will run into the same questions.

Option 1:

PUSHD .
REM main scripts body
POPD

Option 2:

PUSHD %cd%
REM main scripts body
POPD

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