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I'm creating a line with SVG and it is appearing blurry in my web page. To be more clear, it appears larger than the stroke width of 1px. Why is this happening and is there a way to fix it in SVG?

Here is the code. When I run this code by itself it is not blurry. When it's in my web page the line appears to be about 2px in height rather than 1.

#HorizontalLine1178  {
	stroke:rgb(154,154,154);
	stroke-width:1;
}
<svg style="width:100%;">
    <line id="HorizontalLine1178" y2="97" y1="97" x2="100%" x1="62" >
</svg>

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2 Answers 2

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Because when its Y coordinates lies on whole pixel, the 1px stroke is around it and thus "anti-aliased" (refer to Paul LeBeau's excellent illustration). Use half pixel coordinates in this case, or apply shape-rendering="crispEdges" that will do the pixel rounding for you, but will produce sharp edges even on rounded objects:

<svg style="width:100%; background-color: white" stroke="black" fill="white" stroke-width="1">
    <line y2="10.0" y1="10.0" x2="90%" x1="10">
        <title>.0</title>
    </line>
    <line y2="15.5" y1="15.5" x2="90%" x1="10">
        <title>.5</title>
    </line>
    <line y2="20.0" y1="20.0" x2="90%" x1="10" shape-rendering="crispEdges">
        <title>.0 + crispEdges</title>
    </line>

    <circle cy="50" cx="20" r="10">
        <title>.0</title>
    </circle>
    <circle cy="49.5" cx="44.5" r="10">
        <title>.5</title>
    </circle>
    <circle cy="50" cx="70" r="10" shape-rendering="crispEdges">
        <title>.0 + crispEdges</title>
    </circle>

    <rect x="90" y="40" width="20" height="20">
        <title>.0</title>
    </rect>
    <rect x="120" y="40" width="20" height="20" shape-rendering="crispEdges">
        <title>.0 + crispEdges</title>
    </rect>
    <rect x="149.5" y="39.5" width="20" height="20">
        <title>.5</title>
    </rect>

    <rect x="190" y="40" width="20" height="20" stroke="none" fill="black">
        <title>.0 + fill, no stroke</title>
    </rect>
    <rect x="219.5" y="39.5" width="20" height="20" stroke="none" fill="black">
        <title>.5 + fill, no stroke</title>
    </rect>
</svg>

Heavily up-scaled screenshot of above snippet made on screen with 1:1 DPI ratio, without zoom (where 1 virtual CSS pixel = 1 physical screen pixel):

From top-left to bottom-right: 1: Wide blurry line; 2, 3: two thin sharp lines; 4, 5: two reasonably smooth circles; 6: overly sharp circle; 7: blurry square; 8, 9: two sharp squares second slightly shifted up); 10: sharp filled square; 11: blurry filled square

With different DPI settings or zoom values you can get different results, depending on where given coordinate ends after adjustments.

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  • Great examples. So if I know ahead of time that a stroke is 1px in height (horizontal line) and the vertical position is an odd number, "81" not "80" than I should change that y position to "81.5" to keep the line 1px in height? Commented Dec 11, 2015 at 18:25
  • DIdn't see your update. The crispEdges setting looks great. Why did you put Line to not have a fill? Do they have a fill by default? Commented Dec 11, 2015 at 18:31
  • 1
    Not odd/even: for strokes keep in mind that they are rendered around lines connecting given coordinates, and that whole coordinates denotes pixel boundaries. See Pauls answer in linked question, it describes it better. Ad fill for line: no, just smashed it into selector to affect rects.
    – myf
    Commented Dec 11, 2015 at 18:34
  • 1
    Whole-pixel coordinates are otherwise good for strokeless filled shapes (see the last square in example).
    – myf
    Commented Dec 11, 2015 at 18:36
  • 3
    If you are like me and LOVE this answer -- but you are saying to yourself, "Hey, that's sure a LOT of extra characters in my SVG and I am trying to keep things small!" -- then try placing this just after your opening <svg> tag and remember to close it just before </svg>: <g shape-rendering="crispEdges">. Works for every object that way and really improved my work. Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 10:26
1

SVG considers whole numbered coordinates to fall in between pixels. As well as the selected answer you could also add a transform to your svg element.

e.g.

<svg transform="translate(-0.5 -0.5)">...</svg>

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