2

I have managed to create a simple angular app that lists the file contents of a folder (using a node endpoint that spits out a json). What i want to do now is to somehow get notified if a new file is added to the folder. I need this on both server and client side.

server.js:

var express = require('express'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    path = require('path');

var app = express();

function dirTree(filename) {
    var stats = fs.lstatSync(filename),
        info = {
            path: filename,
            name: path.basename(filename)
        };

    if (stats.isDirectory()) {
        info.type = "folder";
        info.children = fs.readdirSync(filename).map(function(child) {
            return dirTree(filename + '/' + child);
        });
    } else {
        info.type = "file";
    }

    return info;
}

app.set('jsonp callback', true);

app.get('/', function(req, res) {
    res.header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*');
    res.header('Charset','utf-8');
    res.header('Content-Type', 'application/json');

    var jsonp_callback = app.get('jsonp callback name');
    var jsonp = (req.query[jsonp_callback]);
    var result = dirTree('files');
    if (jsonp) {
        res.jsonp(result);
    }
    else {
        res.json(result);
    }
});

app.listen(3001);

console.log('Listening on port 3001...');

angular controller:

'use strict';

angular.module('myApp').controller('PageCtrl', function($scope, folderUrl, $http) {
    $http.jsonp(folderUrl).success(function(data, status, headers, config) {
        console.log(data);
        $scope.files = data.children;
    }).error(function(data, status, headers, config) {
        console.log(data, status, headers, config);
    });
});

This works flawlessly. However you need to refresh the page if a new file is added to the folder. Yes the code does not cover this, and the implementation is also very minimal (using a onetime get request on controller init wont be sufficient).

So how exactly could one do this? There should be a listener on node side that would somehow emit an event that angular could catch (?).

  1. how do i listen for "new file addition" in node.js
  2. how do i emit an event / communicate between node and angular (probably sockets)

All observations are welcome!

PS: I dont want to mix serverside and clientside logic! I need a clean communication solution / best practice

PS2: express 4.x is used

  • So how about putting your request in $timeout and just have a server side logic that will get called and if new file arrives just return a response with whatever you want to return? – Chris Hermut Dec 12 '15 at 16:15
  • i assume you mean $interval, and by that you mean polling the server for new data? – dekztah Dec 12 '15 at 16:25
  • 1
    you could poll but you can also just use websockets – atsituab Dec 12 '15 at 16:26
  • @dekztah yes sorry. I assume it's not the case then. – Chris Hermut Dec 12 '15 at 16:30
  • 1
    websockets are the right way, unfortunately I can't use them, I hope someone will add an answer to learn some more... – Gianmarco Dec 12 '15 at 17:00
1

Websockets are the way to go.

  • This example uses socket.io, so before getting started make sure to npm install --save socket.io.
  • The original dirTree and the jsonp callback remain unchanged
  • The angular request uses regular json in callback

server.js:

var http = require('http'),
    express = require('express'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    path = require('path');

var app = express();    
var server = http.createServer(app);  

function dirTree(filename) {
    ...
}

app.set('jsonp callback', true);

app.get('/', function(req, res) {
    ...
});

app.get('/index.html', function (req, res) {
    res.sendfile('index.html');
});

var io = require('socket.io').listen(server);
io.sockets.on('connection', function(socket) {
    var watcher = fs.watch('files', function (event, filename) {
        if (fs.existsSync('files/' + filename)) {
            socket.emit('change', dirTree('files/' + filename));
        }
    });
    socket.on('disconnect', function() {
      watcher.close(); 
   });
});

server.listen(3001, function() {
    console.log('Listening on port 3001...');    
});

So we're mostly just adding the websocket listener. It waits for connections, then uses node's built in fs.watch method. When it detects a change, it uses the existing dirTree method to contruct a message that it then sends to the client.

index.html:

<!doctype html>
<html ng-app="myApp">
  <head>
    <script src="/socket.io/socket.io.js"></script>
    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.4.5/angular.min.js"></script>
    <script>
        angular.module('myApp', [])
            .controller('PageCtrl', function($scope, $http) {
                $http.get('/').success(function(data, status, headers, config) {
                    $scope.files = data.children;

                    var socket = io.connect();
                    socket.on('change', function(msg) {
                        $scope.files.push(msg);
                        $scope.$digest();
                    });

                }).error(function(data, status, headers, config) {
                    console.log(data, status, headers, config);
                });
            });
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
      <div ng-controller="PageCtrl">
          <ul><li ng-repeat="f in files">{{f}}</li></ul>
      </div>
  </body>
</html>

Here we just need to use socket.io to connect to the webocket listener we created in server.js, listen for change messages, and push them into existing $scope.files array that's already been populated by the initial json request.

This example also lacks a few other messages you'd need to handle for file renames and deletes, as well as the ability to work recursively.

NOTE: don't actually use node's fs.watch api for anything other than proof of concept code like this. If you read the docs, you'll see it behaves quit differently from one platform to the next. Highly suggest a third party file watching module such as watch.

  • works like a charm, although i must admit i was doing it wrong at first (grunt serving angular at port 9000 and socket io GET requests failing due to that). thank you very much! – dekztah Dec 12 '15 at 18:46

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