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Does MFC CMap have a good performance compared to std::unordered_map or std::map, I ask this question because I'm going to start a project in my company, and to accelerate the development I'm going a start with an existing "similar" project but in this last, there is MFC CMap (hash table maps) ans I thought that using std::unordered_map can maybe increase performances. I didn't find any benchmarks or good articles related to CMap on the internet. Otherwise, with std::unordered_map do I have to fix a size for the hash table too like in CMap to avoid collisions and performances issues ?

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    I didn't find any benchmarks or good articles related to CMap on the interne Why don't you benchmark both yourself with a dataset similar to what you will use in production on the hardware that you will use in production?
    – drescherjm
    Dec 13, 2015 at 16:00
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    CMap doesn't have a move support (you have to always pass it as an output parameter because of this if you want to return one from a function) and doesn't display anything useful in a watch window in a debugger. You also have to write code like CMap<int, const int&, CString, const CString &> map; instead of std::unordered_map<int, const CString> map;. If I were you I wouldn't even consider using of it - but it is up to you. Dec 13, 2015 at 16:01
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    CMap is an outdated, non-portable horror show. Do us all a favour: use the standard containers and help bury MFC forever. Dec 13, 2015 at 16:08
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    Pick between either std::map or std::unordered_map for new MFC projects. I would stay away from all MFC containers except CString --- See also std::map versus std::unordered_map Dec 13, 2015 at 17:13
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    @Aminos I understand the problem but idiot software managers need to be educated, otherwise the discipline of software development will be held back by MFC for another 20 years... Dec 13, 2015 at 21:46

2 Answers 2

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I've made pretty simple performance comparison test:

int nElements = 1000000;
CMap<int, int, CString, LPCTSTR> MfcHashTable;
MfcHashTable.InitHashTable(nElements);

// CMap insert
DWORD dwStart = ::GetTickCount();
for(int i=0; i<nElements; i++)
{
    CString sBase;
    sBase.AppendFormat(_T("Test String %d"), i);
    MfcHashTable[i] = sBase;
}

DWORD dwMfcMapInsert = ::GetTickCount() - dwStart;

// CMap lookup
CString sValue;

dwStart = ::GetTickCount();
for(int i=0; i<nElements; i++)
{
    MfcHashTable.Lookup(i, sValue);
}
DWORD dwMfcMapLookup = ::GetTickCount() - dwStart;

// std::map insert
std::map<int, CString> StdMap;
dwStart = ::GetTickCount();
for(int i=0; i<nElements; i++)
{
    CString sBase;
    sBase.AppendFormat(_T("Test String %d"), i);
    StdMap[i] = sBase;
}
DWORD dwStdMapInsert = ::GetTickCount() - dwStart;

//std::map lookup
dwStart = ::GetTickCount();
std::map<int, CString>::iterator it;
for(int i=0; i<nElements; i++)
{
    it = StdMap.find(i);
    CString sBase = it->second;
}
DWORD dwStdMapLookup = ::GetTickCount() - dwStart;

// std::unordered_map insert (hash table)
std::unordered_map<int, CString> StdUnordMap;
dwStart = ::GetTickCount();
for(int i=0; i<nElements; i++)
{
    CString sBase;
    sBase.AppendFormat(_T("Test String %d"), i);
    StdUnordMap[i] = sBase;
}
DWORD dwStdUnordMapInsert = ::GetTickCount() - dwStart;

//std::map lookup
dwStart = ::GetTickCount();
std::unordered_map<int, CString>::iterator it1;
for(int i=0; i<nElements; i++)
{
    it1 = StdUnordMap.find(i);
    CString sBase = it1->second;
}
DWORD dwStdUnordMapLookup = ::GetTickCount() - dwStart;

cout << dwMfcMapInsert << endl;
cout << dwMfcMapLookup << endl;

cout << dwStdMapInsert << endl;
cout << dwStdMapLookup << endl;

cout << dwStdUnordMapInsert << endl;
cout << dwStdUnordMapLookup << endl;

Here are the results for 1000000 elements on Intel Core i5 2.5Ghz 8GB RAM (Lenovo ThinkPad X230):

MFC CMap insert: 1125
MFC CMap lookup: 125
std::map insert: 1406
std::map lookup: 172
std::unordered_map insert: 1578
std::unordered_map lookup: 140

So surprisingly the CMap is the winner here. It turns out the ugly legacy CMap is not that bad after all!

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    And if you include the destruction. The CMap is even much faster, because it use memory blocks comparable with a pool allocator. If you look into the construction of the code it seams clear that the MFC Map is "better". ;) Even if it outdated.
    – xMRi
    Dec 14, 2015 at 11:25
  • interesting, I've done a benchmark too, I used words from a big txt dictionary file and High performance coutner to measure time, but I did a mistake, for std::unordered_map I used std::string type for the values or keys whereas for CMaps, I used CStrings, so in that case unordered_map beat CMaps (by tens of milliseconds), I ll rewrite my benchmark and I ll took CString for everybody (because I couldn't put a std::string as a value in CMap, I didn't remember why it didn't work)
    – Aminos
    Dec 14, 2015 at 12:03
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    I think the test is in CMap's favor because the size is known (InitHashTable), it would be much slower if size is large and unknown. Meanwhile unordered_map is not taking advantage of reserve. Only lookup is faster for CMap. Dec 14, 2015 at 19:49
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    You're right. The reason I did not use it is because reserve() was not implemented in VS2010 for unordered_map. Anyways I've implemented reserve as follows: StdUnordMap.rehash(std::ceil(nElements / StdUnordMap.max_load_factor())); The results are the following: 1312 for insert, 140 for lookup. A little bit better but still not the best. Dec 14, 2015 at 20:12
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    As long as you don't use a pool allocator, the MFC map will beat the unordered_map specially when you have a lot of entries. And when the hash map is just created for a temporary action the destruction phase in deleting all items is not a "short" action.
    – xMRi
    Dec 16, 2015 at 9:14
0

Well 20 seconds searching for "MFC CMap" found

Lookup uses a hashing algorithm to quickly find the map element with a key that exactly matches the given key.

So the big-O efficiency will be like unordered_map.

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    Could down-voters please explain? The question asked whether CMap had similar performance to map or unordered_map. I answered that it will be similar to unordered_map. Why is that a bad answer? Dec 14, 2015 at 13:00

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