28

EDIT: tl;dr -- this problem appears to be limited to a small set of OS/compiler/library combinations and is now tracked in the GCC Bugzilla as Bug 68921 thanks to @JonathanWakely.

I'm waiting on a future and I've noticed that top shows 100% CPU usage and strace shows a steady stream of futex calls:

...
[pid 15141] futex(0x9d19a24, FUTEX_WAIT, -2147483648, {4222429828, 3077922816}) = -1 EINVAL (Invalid argument)
...

This is on Linux 4.2.0 (32-bit i686), compiled with gcc version 5.2.1.

Here is my minimum-viable example program:

#include <future>
#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <unistd.h>

int main() {
  std::promise<void> p;
  auto f = p.get_future();

  std::thread t([&p](){
    std::cout << "Biding my time in a thread.\n";
    sleep(10);
    p.set_value();
  });

  std::cout << "Waiting.\n";
  f.wait();
  std::cout << "Done.\n";

  t.join();
  return 0;
}

and here is the compiler invocation (same behavior without -g):

g++ --std=c++11 -Wall -g -o spin-wait spin-wait.cc -pthread

Is there a more-performant alternative?

Here is a logically-similar program using std::condition_variable that seems to perform much better:

#include <condition_variable>
#include <iostream>
#include <mutex>
#include <thread>
#include <unistd.h>

int main() {
  bool done = 0;
  std::mutex m;
  std::condition_variable cv;

  std::thread t([&m, &cv, &done](){
    std::cout << "Biding my time in a thread.\n";
    sleep(10);
    {
      std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(m);
      done = 1;
    }
    cv.notify_all();
  });

  std::cout << "Waiting.\n";
  {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(m);
    cv.wait(lock, [&done]{ return done; });
  }
  std::cout << "Done.\n";

  t.join();
  return 0;
}

Am I doing something wrong with my std::future-based code, or is the implementation in my libstdc++ just that bad?

  • 1
    Maybe you should find out why futex is being called with an invalid argument, and fix it... – user253751 Dec 14 '15 at 4:04
  • 1
    I bet somewhere there's code like while(!future_is_done) futex(...); where they're expecting the call to futex to wait for a while, but if it fails it ends up accidentally being an infinite loop. – user253751 Dec 14 '15 at 4:06
  • 3
    i wanted to give the Internet a chance to tell me just how wrong my code was before assuming it was someone else's bug, but yeah, it does feel like libstdc++ either has a bug or makes some sort of unstated assumption. – Rob Starling Dec 14 '15 at 4:15
  • 2
    linux 4.2.0 (ubuntu 15.10), g++5.2.1, 64-bit, no noticeable cpu usage here. – dyp Dec 14 '15 at 9:24
  • 2
    @RobStarling Indeed, -m32 and I can reproduce the issue you're describing: 100 % cpu usage and a lot of futex waits. – dyp Dec 15 '15 at 7:29
9

No of course it shouldn't be doing that, it's a bug in the implementation, not a property of std::future.

This is now https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=68921 - the loop that keeps calling futex(2) is in __atomic_futex_unsigned::_M_load_and_test_until

It looks like a simple missing argument to the syscall function, so a garbage pointer is passed to the kernel, which complains that it's not a valid timespec* argument. I'm testing the fix and will commit tomorrow, so it will be fixed in GCC 5.4

  • @TemplateRex, that doesn't seem like a directly relevant comment for this answer. See gcc.gnu.org/develop.html which explains documentation and regression fixes only. Exceptions can be made for serious non-regression bugs, or trivial fixes that pose no risk of breaking the release branch (but not just because someone pings it). It is entirely in line with the policy that something fixed on trunk is not automatically fixed on a release branch, so you should not be surprised by that. The feature freeze for gcc 5 was November 2014! That fix does look simple, but I don't know if it's safe. – Jonathan Wakely Dec 19 '15 at 17:55
0

No, it should not. It usually works great.

(In the comments, we're trying to determine more about a specific broken configuration in which the resultant executable appears to spin-wait, but I believe that's the answer. It would still be nice to determine if this is still a spin-wait on a 32-bit target in the latest g++.)

The promise is the "push" end of the promise-future communication channel: the operation that stores a value in the shared state synchronizes-with (as defined in std::memory_order) the successful return from any function that is waiting on the shared state (such as std::future::get).

I assume this includes std::future::wait.

[std::promise::set_value] Atomically stores the value into the shared state and makes the state ready. The operation behaves as though set_value, set_exception, set_value_at_thread_exit, and set_exception_at_thread_exit acquire a single mutex associated with the promise object while updating the promise object.

While it's a little unsettling that they describe the synchronization in terms of the promise object and not the shared-state, the intent is pretty clear.

cppreference.com[*] goes on to use it in exactly the way that wasn't working in the question above. ("This example shows how promise can be used as signals between threads.")

  • I don't find it unsettling, since the shared state is associated with that promise at the time of the call, and a shared state can only be associated with one promise at a time, and the mutex is only needed by operations on the promise, not by the readers waiting on the same shared state. – Jonathan Wakely Dec 15 '15 at 18:09
  • got it. the mutex comment means only one thing can interact with the promise to make the state ready and the synchronizes-with comment means that anything waiting on the state sees the value. – Rob Starling Dec 15 '15 at 18:17
  • 1
    Right, that mutex (which doesn't have to actually exist, as long as the implementation behaves as though it did) is used to serialize calls to the set_xxx functions. Most operations on the shared state are required to be atomic w.r.t readers and writers, but this is an operation on (or at least "through") the promise. – Jonathan Wakely Dec 15 '15 at 18:31

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