41

Precursor: I'm just starting to get my feet wet with golang.

This may prove to a be a silly question as it's quite easy to perform these calculations but I'm going to ask it anyway as I didn't find an answer when Googling.

Is there a built in function that returns the minimum of a slice of int arguments:

func MinIntSlice(v []int) (m int) {
    if len(v) > 0 {
        m = v[0]
    }
    for i := 1; i < len(v); i++ {
        if v[i] < m {
            m = v[i]
        }
    }
    return
}

OR the minimum of a variable number of int arguments:

func MinIntVarible(v1 int, vn ...int) (m int) {
    m = v1
    for i := 0; i < len(vn); i++ {
        if vn[i] < m {
            m = vn[i]
        }
    }
    return
}

If not, is the best "convention" simply to create a package that contains helpers like this?

7 Answers 7

49

There is no built-in for this.

If you need this functionality only in one package you can write an un-exported function (e.g. minIntSlice).

If you need this functionality in multiple packages you can create a package and put similar functions there. You should consider making this package internal (https://golang.org/s/go14internal).

A few suggestions how to improve your code:

  1. MinIntSlice will return 0 for an empty slice. However 0 is a valid min element as well. I think calling panic on an empty slice is a better option.

  2. Use range loop:

    for i, e := range v {
        if i==0 || e < m {
            m = e
        }
    }
    

by not giving the index of value it will give you the minimum value 0, which may not be present in given values, so you also have to apply condition on index.

2
  • 3
    That is a helpful piece of feedback. I had not as of yet been exposed to "range".
    – Jesse
    Dec 14, 2015 at 14:27
  • Thank you for the pointer to "internal" packages. I do have duplicated unexported functions like this, and internal looks like the way to better maintain these. Nov 19, 2017 at 16:54
17

As @kostya correctly stated there is no built-in min or max function in Golang.

However, I would suggest a slightly different solution:

func MinMax(array []int) (int, int) {
    var max int = array[0]
    var min int = array[0]
    for _, value := range array {
        if max < value {
            max = value
        }
        if min > value {
            min = value
        }
    }
    return min, max
}

By that the problem of an empty slice is solved: a runtime error shows up (index out of range) and the max value is for free. :-)

4
    min := s[0]
    for i :=1; i < len(s); i++ {
        if min > s[i] {
            min = s[i]
        }
    }

min > s[i]? min = s[i] : min

1
  • 1
    Please don't post only code as answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. Jun 21, 2020 at 9:37
3

This package contains some implementations of Min and Max functions for separate values or slices. After go get it can be used like:

import (
    "fmt"
    "<Full URL>/go-imath/ix" // Functions for int type
)
...
fmt.Println(ix.Min(100, 152)) // Output: 100
fmt.Println(ix.Mins(234, 55, 180)) // Output: 55
fmt.Println(ix.MinSlice([]int{2, 29, 8, -1})) // Output: -1
1

if you don't care about input array

import . "sort"
func MinIntSlice(v []int){
    Ints(v)
    return z[0]
}

func MaxIntSlice(v []int){
    Ints(v)
    return z[len(v)-1]
}
// and MinMax version
func MinMax(v []int)(int,int){
    Ints(v)
    return z[0],z[len(v)-1]
}
0

With sorting it can be shorter:

func MinIntSlice(v []int) int {
  sort.Ints(v)
  return v[0]
}

func MaxIntSlice(v []int) int {
  sort.Ints(v)
  return v[len(v)-1]
}

But don't forget to modify it for zero length slices on your taste.

4
  • 7
    Mutating the underlying slice just to pick something is a terrible idea. This could change assertions about the implicit ordering elsewhere
    – devshorts
    Nov 21, 2018 at 18:15
  • 4
    sorting is o(n log n) but maximum is a linear time o(n) algorithm, this "code is shorter" but the algorithm is worse.
    – Tommy
    Apr 26, 2019 at 13:57
  • Right, it's far from optimal. But when you need min/max of small slice somewhere in middle of algorithm it's fine to sort it and take first/last instead of making separate function which you will never use again. May 7, 2019 at 4:15
  • 1
    @fullpipe the slice is passed by value. Not the underlying data. It will be modified.
    – UmNyobe
    May 16, 2019 at 13:48
0

Using @kostya's answer

  1. Use range loop:

    for i, e := range v {
        if i==0 || e < m {
            m = e
        }
    }
    

by not giving the index of value it will give you the minimum value 0, which may not be present in given values

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