106

I want to create a function that will accept any old string (will usually be a single word) and from that somehow generate a hexadecimal value between #000000 and #FFFFFF, so I can use it as a colour for a HTML element.

Maybe even a shorthand hex value (e.g: #FFF) if that's less complicated. In fact, a colour from a 'web-safe' palette would be ideal.

  • 2
    Could give some sample input and/or links to the similar questions? – qw3n Aug 6 '10 at 17:59
  • 2
    Not an answer, but you may find the following useful: To convert a hexadecimal to an integer, use parseInt(hexstr, 10). To convert an integer to a hexadecimal, use n.toString(16), where n is a integer. – Cristian Sanchez Aug 6 '10 at 18:00
  • @qw3n - sample input: just short, plain old text strings... like 'Medicine', 'Surgery', 'Neurology', 'General Practice' etc. Ranging between 3 and say, 20 characters... can't find the other one but here's the java question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2464745/… @Daniel - Thanks. I need to sit down and have another serious go at this. could be useful. – Darragh Enright Aug 6 '10 at 18:42

11 Answers 11

119

Just porting over the Java from Compute hex color code for an arbitrary string to Javascript:

function hashCode(str) { // java String#hashCode
    var hash = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
       hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
    }
    return hash;
} 

function intToRGB(i){
    var c = (i & 0x00FFFFFF)
        .toString(16)
        .toUpperCase();

    return "00000".substring(0, 6 - c.length) + c;
}

To convert you would do:

intToRGB(hashCode(your_string))
  • great! thanks, this works well. I don't know much about bitwise operators and stuff so your help porting it over is appreciated. – Darragh Enright Aug 8 '10 at 23:28
  • 5
    jsfiddle.net/sUxQe sometimes LESS than 6 ... – Skylar Saveland May 2 '13 at 2:17
  • It needs to pad the hex strings, such as: ("00" + ((this >> 24) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + ((this >> 16) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + ((this >> 8) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + (this & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2); – Thymine Feb 6 '14 at 22:38
  • 2
    I'm converting a bunch of music genre tags to background colors and this saved me a lot of time. – Kyle Pennell Feb 25 '16 at 5:18
  • 1
    I have some problems with almost same colours for similar strings, for example: intToRGB(hashCode('hello1')) -> "3A019F" intToRGB(hashCode('hello2')) -> "3A01A0" And I enhance your code by adding multiplication for final hash value: return 100 * hash; – SirWojtek Aug 24 '17 at 1:43
145

Here's an adaptation of CD Sanchez' answer that consistently returns a 6-digit colour code:

var stringToColour = function(str) {
  var hash = 0;
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
  }
  var colour = '#';
  for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    var value = (hash >> (i * 8)) & 0xFF;
    colour += ('00' + value.toString(16)).substr(-2);
  }
  return colour;
}

Usage:

stringToColour("greenish");
// -> #9bc63b

Example:

http://jsfiddle.net/sUK45/

(An alternative/simpler solution might involve returning an 'rgb(...)'-style colour code.)

  • A Benchmark for this: jsperf.com/3-rgb-ints-to-hexcolor-string – yckart May 30 '13 at 10:30
  • 3
    This code works awesome in conjunction with NoSQL auto-generated ID's, your colour will be the same every time for the same user. – deviavir Jun 26 '14 at 20:57
  • 22
    Upvoted for spelling colour correctly – Tjorriemorrie Dec 8 '15 at 14:58
  • I needed the alpha channel for transparency in my hex codes as well. This helped (adding two digits for the alpha channel at the end of my hex code): gist.github.com/lopspower/03fb1cc0ac9f32ef38f4 – Husterknupp Oct 28 '18 at 20:10
  • @Tjorriemorrie Upvoted for pointing out that it's colour and not color. Yes, yes, it's not really on topic but it's something that's important to me (in fact when typing it originally I spelt it 'colour' both times!). Thank you. – Pryftan Mar 13 at 16:43
35

I wanted similar richness in colors for HTML elements, I was surprised to find that CSS now supports hsl() colors, so a full solution for me is below:

Also see How to automatically generate N "distinct" colors? for more alternatives more similar to this.

function colorByHashCode(value) {
    return "<span style='color:" + value.getHashCode().intToHSL() + "'>" + value + "</span>";
}
String.prototype.getHashCode = function() {
    var hash = 0;
    if (this.length == 0) return hash;
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        hash = this.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
        hash = hash & hash; // Convert to 32bit integer
    }
    return hash;
};
Number.prototype.intToHSL = function() {
    var shortened = this % 360;
    return "hsl(" + shortened + ",100%,30%)";
};

document.body.innerHTML = [
  "javascript",
  "is",
  "nice",
].map(colorByHashCode).join("<br/>");
span {
  font-size: 50px;
  font-weight: 800;
}

In HSL its Hue, Saturation, Lightness. So the hue between 0-359 will get all colors, saturation is how rich you want the color, 100% works for me. And Lightness determines the deepness, 50% is normal, 25% is dark colors, 75% is pastel. I have 30% because it fit with my color scheme best.

  • 2
    A very versatile solution. – MastaBaba May 18 '15 at 15:02
  • 1
    Thx for sharing a solution, where you can decide how colorful the colors should be! – Florian Bauer May 28 '16 at 12:22
  • @haykam Thanks for making it into a snippet! – Thymine Oct 15 '18 at 17:59
  • This approach is really useful to give the desired vibrance/subtlety that my app needed. A random Hex varies far too much in saturation and brightness to be useful in most situations. Thanks for this! – simey.me Mar 18 at 7:42
  • This solution returns too little colors, won't do. – asdfasdfads yesterday
8

I find that generating random colors tends to create colors that do not have enough contrast for my taste. The easiest way I have found to get around that is to pre-populate a list of very different colors. For every new string, assign the next color in the list:

// Takes any string and converts it into a #RRGGBB color.
var StringToColor = (function(){
    var instance = null;

    return {
    next: function stringToColor(str) {
        if(instance === null) {
            instance = {};
            instance.stringToColorHash = {};
            instance.nextVeryDifferntColorIdx = 0;
            instance.veryDifferentColors = ["#000000","#00FF00","#0000FF","#FF0000","#01FFFE","#FFA6FE","#FFDB66","#006401","#010067","#95003A","#007DB5","#FF00F6","#FFEEE8","#774D00","#90FB92","#0076FF","#D5FF00","#FF937E","#6A826C","#FF029D","#FE8900","#7A4782","#7E2DD2","#85A900","#FF0056","#A42400","#00AE7E","#683D3B","#BDC6FF","#263400","#BDD393","#00B917","#9E008E","#001544","#C28C9F","#FF74A3","#01D0FF","#004754","#E56FFE","#788231","#0E4CA1","#91D0CB","#BE9970","#968AE8","#BB8800","#43002C","#DEFF74","#00FFC6","#FFE502","#620E00","#008F9C","#98FF52","#7544B1","#B500FF","#00FF78","#FF6E41","#005F39","#6B6882","#5FAD4E","#A75740","#A5FFD2","#FFB167","#009BFF","#E85EBE"];
        }

        if(!instance.stringToColorHash[str])
            instance.stringToColorHash[str] = instance.veryDifferentColors[instance.nextVeryDifferntColorIdx++];

            return instance.stringToColorHash[str];
        }
    }
})();

// Get a new color for each string
StringToColor.next("get first color");
StringToColor.next("get second color");

// Will return the same color as the first time
StringToColor.next("get first color");

While this has a limit to only 64 colors, I find most humans can't really tell the difference after that anyway. I suppose you could always add more colors.

While this code uses hard-coded colors, you are at least guaranteed to know during development exactly how much contrast you will see between colors in production.

Color list has been lifted from this SO answer, there are other lists with more colors.

  • Fwiw there's an algorithm out there to determine contrast. I wrote something with it years ago (but in C). Too much going on to worry about it and it's an old answer anyway but figured I'd point out that there is a way to determine contrast. – Pryftan Mar 13 at 16:46
5

If your inputs are not different enough for a simple hash to use the entire color spectrum, you can use a seeded random number generator instead of a hash function.

I'm using the color coder from Joe Freeman's answer, and David Bau's seeded random number generator.

function stringToColour(str) {
    Math.seedrandom(str);
    var rand = Math.random() * Math.pow(255,3);
    Math.seedrandom(); // don't leave a non-random seed in the generator
    for (var i = 0, colour = "#"; i < 3; colour += ("00" + ((rand >> i++ * 8) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2));
    return colour;
}
5

I have opened a pull request to Please.js that allows generating a color from a hash.

You can map the string to a color like so:

const color = Please.make_color({
    from_hash: "any string goes here"
});

For example, "any string goes here" will return as "#47291b"
and "another!" returns as "#1f0c3d"

  • Really cool thanks for adding that. Hi wanting to generate circles with letters in based on a name like Google inbox does:) – marcus7777 Nov 18 '16 at 10:22
  • when I saw this answer, I thought, perfect, now I have to think about the color schema so it doesn't generate very random colors, then I read about the Please.js make_color options and it put a beautiful smile in my face. – panchicore Feb 22 at 23:57
4

Yet another solution for random colors:

function colorize(str) {
    for (var i = 0, hash = 0; i < str.length; hash = str.charCodeAt(i++) + ((hash << 5) - hash));
    color = Math.floor(Math.abs((Math.sin(hash) * 10000) % 1 * 16777216)).toString(16);
    return '#' + Array(6 - color.length + 1).join('0') + color;
}

It's a mixed of things that does the job for me. I used JFreeman Hash function (also an answer in this thread) and Asykäri pseudo random function from here and some padding and math from myself.

I doubt the function produces evenly distributed colors, though it looks nice and does that what it should do.

  • '0'.repeat(...) is not valid javascript – kikito May 21 '14 at 16:20
  • @kikito fair enough, probably I had the prototype extended somehow (JQuery?). Anyway, I've edited the function so it's javascript only... thanks for pointing that out. – estani May 22 '14 at 13:29
  • @kikito it's valid ES6, though using it would be neglecting cross-browser compatibility. – Patrick Roberts Jul 24 '16 at 20:58
4

Here's a solution I came up with to generate aesthetically pleasing pastel colours based on an input string. It uses the first two chars of the string as a random seed, then generates R/G/B based on that seed.

It could be easily extended so that the seed is the XOR of all chars in the string, rather than just the first two.

Inspired by David Crow's answer here: Algorithm to randomly generate an aesthetically-pleasing color palette

//magic to convert strings to a nice pastel colour based on first two chars
//
// every string with the same first two chars will generate the same pastel colour
function pastel_colour(input_str) {

    //TODO: adjust base colour values below based on theme
    var baseRed = 128;
    var baseGreen = 128;
    var baseBlue = 128;

    //lazy seeded random hack to get values from 0 - 256
    //for seed just take bitwise XOR of first two chars
    var seed = input_str.charCodeAt(0) ^ input_str.charCodeAt(1);
    var rand_1 = Math.abs((Math.sin(seed++) * 10000)) % 256;
    var rand_2 = Math.abs((Math.sin(seed++) * 10000)) % 256;
    var rand_3 = Math.abs((Math.sin(seed++) * 10000)) % 256;

    //build colour
    var red = Math.round((rand_1 + baseRed) / 2);
    var green = Math.round((rand_2 + baseGreen) / 2);
    var blue = Math.round((rand_3 + baseBlue) / 2);

    return { red: red, green: green, blue: blue };
}

GIST is here: https://gist.github.com/ro-sharp/49fd46a071a267d9e5dd

  • I must say that this is a really odd way of doing it. It kind of works but there aren't very many colors available. XOR of the first two colors makes no distinction of order so there are just combinations of letters. A simple addition I did to increase the number of colors was var seed = 0; for (var i in input_str) { seed ^= i; } – Gussoh Sep 30 '15 at 12:59
  • Yes, it really depends how many colours you'd like to generate. I recall in this instance I was creating different panes in a UI and wanted a limited number of colours rather than a rainbow :) – Robert Sharp Oct 19 '18 at 4:49
2

Using the hashCode as in Cristian Sanchez's answer with hsl and modern javascript, you can create a color picker with good contrast like this:

function hashCode(str) {
  let hash = 0;
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
  }
  return hash;
}

function pickColor(str) {
  return `hsl(${hashCode(str) % 360}, 100%, 80%)`;
}

one.style.backgroundColor = pickColor(one.innerText)
two.style.backgroundColor = pickColor(two.innerText)
div {
  padding: 10px;
}
<div id="one">One</div>
<div id="two">Two</div>

Since it's hsl, you can scale luminance to get the contrast you're looking for.

function hashCode(str) {
  let hash = 0;
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
  }
  return hash;
}

function pickColor(str) {
  // Note the last value here is now 50% instead of 80%
  return `hsl(${hashCode(str) % 360}, 100%, 50%)`;
}

one.style.backgroundColor = pickColor(one.innerText)
two.style.backgroundColor = pickColor(two.innerText)
div {
  color: white;
  padding: 10px;
}
<div id="one">One</div>
<div id="two">Two</div>

1

Here is another try:

function stringToColor(str){
  var hash = 0;
  for(var i=0; i < str.length; i++) {
    hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 3) - hash);
  }
  var color = Math.abs(hash).toString(16).substring(0, 6);

  return "#" + '000000'.substring(0, 6 - color.length) + color;
}
0

This function does the trick. It's an adaptation of this, fairly longer implementation this repo ..

const color = (str) => {
    let rgb = [];
    // Changing non-hexadecimal characters to 0
    str = [...str].map(c => (/[0-9A-Fa-f]/g.test(c)) ? c : 0).join('');
    // Padding string with zeroes until it adds up to 3
    while (str.length % 3) str += '0';

    // Dividing string into 3 equally large arrays
    for (i = 0; i < str.length; i += str.length / 3)
        rgb.push(str.slice(i, i + str.length / 3));

    // Formatting a hex color from the first two letters of each portion
    return `#${rgb.map(string => string.slice(0, 2)).join('')}`;
}

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