11

I have a really simple program that creates a bunch of objects and iterates through them to set each object's Priority property.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    foreach (var obj in ObjectCreator.CreateObjectsWithPriorities())
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Object #{0} has priority {1}",
                                         obj.Id, obj.Priority));
}

class ObjectCreator
{
    public static IEnumerable<ObjectWithPriority> CreateObjectsWithPriorities()
    {
        var objs = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.Select(i => new ObjectWithPriority() { Id = i });
        ApplyPriorities(objs);
        return objs;
    }

    static void ApplyPriorities(IEnumerable<ObjectWithPriority> objs)
    {
        foreach (var obj in objs)
        {
            obj.Priority = obj.Id * 10;
            Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Set priority of object #{0} to {1}", obj.Id, obj.Priority));
        }
    }
}

class ObjectWithPriority
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Priority { get; set; }
}

I'm expecting the IEnumerable in the Main method to contain objects with modified priorities. However, all of them have the default value 0. Here is the log:

Set priority of object #1 to 10 
Set priority of object #2 to 20 
Set priority of object #3 to 30 
Object #1 has priority 0 
Object #2 has priority 0 
Object #3 has priority 0

What is the reason for suche behavior and what should I change here in order to get my priorities working?

  • 1
    Two important facts you must internalize about LINQ: (1) The value of a query expression is a query, and (2) a query is executed when the query is executed. These statement may seem to be tautologies, but your code shows that you did not believe them; you believed that the value of a query is the execution of the query, and that executing it twice only executes it once. – Eric Lippert Dec 14 '15 at 15:50
  • @EricLippert, you're right, I always thought of IEnumerable as a sequence of elements I can enumerate through (as the name suggests), not as a query representation. It also seemed to make sense that if I only needed to loop through the sequence (and never add/remove elements), I could safely use IEnumerable throughout my whole program without calling ToList. As many books/articles suggest, "you should use the most general type possible" for passing objects between methods/classes/programs, and that's what I was trying to do here. Now I see it's more complicated than that. – Andre Borges Dec 15 '15 at 6:49
15

When you do this:

var objs = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.Select(i => new ObjectWithPriority() { Id = i });

You're simply creating a lazily evaluated iterator, this doesn't allocate an array/list to store the ObjectWithPriorty you project. Each time you enumerate the iterator, it will iterate the values again and project an ObjectWithPriority for each iteration, but will discard them.

What you want to do is materialize the query before you pass it, so later you'll actually modifying the already allocated list/array. This can be achieved using Enumerable.ToList or Enumerable.ToArray:

public static IEnumerable<ObjectWithPriority> CreateObjectsWithPriorities()
{
    var objs = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.Select(i => new ObjectWithPriority() { Id = i })
                                .ToList();
    ApplyPriorities(objs);
    return objs;
}

You could additional use Enumerable.Range instead of allocating a fixed size array, which will lazily project the numbers as requested:

var objs = Enumerable.Range(1, 3).Select(i => new ObjectWithPriority { Id = i })
                                 .ToList();
  • Thanks for the explaination! This whole IEnumerable concept is a little confusing. So if I have a method that reads some external data (i.e. a file or a DB table) and converts it into my domain model objects, should I maybe change its return type to List instead of IEnumerable to avoid such problems when other code manipulates the data this method returns? – Andre Borges Dec 14 '15 at 14:02
  • When you're querying a database, you should be very careful with any IEnumerable<T> you return to the caller. For example, if you hand such enumerable to a caller, and he enumerates it multiple times with LINQ or a foreach statement, then the query will be executed multiple times. Perhaps, you're better off returning a T[] or an IList<T>. – Yuval Itzchakov Dec 14 '15 at 14:04
2

To better understand what is happening in your program, you should think of this expression

var objs = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.Select(i => new ObjectWithPriority() { Id = i });

as a query, not as a sequence/list/collection of objects.

But it is obvious from your code that in this particular program you don't need a query. You need a collection that has a finite number of objects and that returns the same objects every time you loop through it using foreach.

So a decent thing to do would be to use ICollection<ObjectWithPriority> instead of IEnumerable<ObjectWithPriority>. This would better represent the program's logic and help avoid some mistakes/misinterpretations like the one you stumbled upon.

The code could be modified as follows:

public static ICollection<ObjectWithPriority> CreateObjectsWithPriorities()
{
    IEnumerable<ObjectWithPriority> queryThatProducesObjectsWithPriorities = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.Select(i => new ObjectWithPriority() { Id = i }); // just for clarification
    ICollection<ObjectWithPriority> objectsWithPriorities = queryThatProducesObjectsWithPriorities.ToList();
    ApplyPriorities(objectsWithPriorities);
    return objectsWithPriorities;
}

static void ApplyPriorities(ICollection<ObjectWithPriority> objs)
{
    foreach (var obj in objs)
    {
        obj.Priority = obj.Id * 10;
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Set priority of object #{0} to {1}", obj.Id, obj.Priority));
    }
}
0

In Addition to the Answer of Yuval Itzchakov:

If you want to lazy-load the priority of your objects you could:

Define your ApplyPriorities() Method just for one object and use it in the select-Method OR add a delegate to your ObjectWithPriority class wich calculates the Priority like shown in the code below:

class ObjectWithPriority
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    private int? priority;
    public int Priority {
        get
        {
            return (priority.HasValue ? priority.Value : (priority = PriorityProvider(this)).Value);

        }

        set { priority = value; }
    }

    Func<ObjectWithPriority, int> PriorityProvider { get; set; }

    public ObjectWithPriority(Func<ObjectWithPriority, int> priorityProvider = null)
    {
        PriorityProvider = priorityProvider ?? (obj => 10 * obj.Id);
    }
}

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