73

at the start and end of my program, I have

from time import strftime
print int(strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")



Y1=int(strftime("%Y"))
m1=int(strftime("%m"))
d1=int(strftime("%d"))
H1=int(strftime("%H"))
M1=int(strftime("%M"))
S1=int(strftime("%S"))


Y2=int(strftime("%Y"))
m2=int(strftime("%m"))
d2=int(strftime("%d"))
H2=int(strftime("%H"))
M2=int(strftime("%M"))
S2=int(strftime("%S"))

print "Difference is:"+str(Y2-Y1)+":"+str(m2-m1)+":"+str(d2-d1)\
          +" "+str(H2-H1)+":"+str(M2-M1)+":"+str(S2-S1)

But when I tried to get the difference, I get syntax errors.... I am doing a few things wrong, but I'm not sure what is going on...

Basically, I just want to store a time in a variable at the start of my program, then store a 2nd time in a second variable near the end, then at the last bit of the program, compute the difference and display it. I am not trying to time a function speed. I am trying to log how long it took for a user to progress through some menus. What is the best way to do this?

1
  • 3
    Think about what happens if the user starts at 8:59:34 and finishes at 9:10:12 Aug 6, 2010 at 19:16

5 Answers 5

130

The datetime module will do all the work for you:

>>> import datetime
>>> a = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> # ...wait a while...
>>> b = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> print(b-a)
0:03:43.984000

If you don't want to display the microseconds, just use (as gnibbler suggested):

>>> a = datetime.datetime.now().replace(microsecond=0)
>>> b = datetime.datetime.now().replace(microsecond=0)
>>> print(b-a)
0:03:43
3
  • 1
    @gnibbler: Hey, nice. Much better than messing with string indices. Aug 7, 2010 at 3:59
  • you can use c=b-a ,str(c) to get '0:03:43' string May 9, 2017 at 9:08
  • 1
    One flaw: Doesn't use monotonic time. I suppose the difference will be wrong when transitioning to/from daylight saving time, and whenever ntpd adjusts your clock. Apr 24, 2018 at 14:05
27
from time import time

start_time = time()
...

end_time = time()
seconds_elapsed = end_time - start_time

hours, rest = divmod(seconds_elapsed, 3600)
minutes, seconds = divmod(rest, 60)
12

You cannot calculate the differences separately ... what difference would that yield for 7:59 and 8:00 o'clock? Try

import time
time.time()

which gives you the seconds since the start of the epoch.

You can then get the intermediate time with something like

timestamp1 = time.time()
# Your code here
timestamp2 = time.time()
print "This took %.2f seconds" % (timestamp2 - timestamp1)
1
  • This is the simplest way.
    – Lane
    May 11 at 8:52
9

Both time.monotonic() and time.monotonic_ns() are correct. Correct as in monotonic.

>>> import time
>>>
>>> time.monotonic()
452782.067158593
>>>
>>> t0 = time.monotonic()
>>> time.sleep(1)
>>> t1 = time.monotonic()
>>> print(t1 - t0)
1.001658110995777

Regardless of language, monotonic time is the right answer, and real time is the wrong answer. The difference is that monotonic time is supposed to give a consistent answer when measuring durations, while real time isn't, as real time may be adjusted – indeed needs to be adjusted – to keep up with reality. Monotonic time is usually the computer's uptime.

As such, time.time() and datetime.now() are wrong ways to do this.

Python also has time.perf_counter() and time.perf_counter_ns(), which are specified to have the highest available resolution, but aren't guarranteed to be monotonic. On PC hardware, though, both typically have nanosecond resolution.

0

Here is a piece of code to do so:

def(StringChallenge(str1)):

#str1 = str1[1:-1]
h1 = 0
h2 = 0
m1 = 0
m2 = 0

def time_dif(h1,m1,h2,m2):
    if(h1 == h2):
        return m2-m1
    else:
        return ((h2-h1-1)*60 + (60-m1) + m2)
count_min = 0

if str1[1] == ':':
    h1=int(str1[:1])
    m1=int(str1[2:4])
else:
    h1=int(str1[:2])
    m1=int(str1[3:5])

if str1[-7] == '-':
    h2=int(str1[-6])
    m2=int(str1[-4:-2])
else:
    h2=int(str1[-7:-5])
    m2=int(str1[-4:-2])

if h1 == 12:
    h1 = 0
if h2 == 12:
    h2 = 0

if "am" in str1[:8]:
    flag1 = 0
else:
    flag1= 1

if "am" in str1[7:]:
    flag2 = 0
else:
    flag2 = 1

if flag1 == flag2:
    if h2 > h1 or (h2 == h1 and m2 >= m1):
        count_min += time_dif(h1,m1,h2,m2)
    else:
        count_min += 1440 - time_dif(h2,m2,h1,m1)
else:
    count_min += (12-h1-1)*60
    count_min += (60 - m1)
    count_min += (h2*60)+m2


return count_min
1
  • 1
    Welcome to StackOverflow. While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply.
    – Ruli
    Nov 27, 2020 at 9:42

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