34

I am learning JavaScript and have been doing a lot of testing in the Chrome console. Even if I clear the console, or use any of the commands I've seen in other threads (localStorage.clear()) any variables I've assigned still show up.

For example, if I do something like var name = "Bob";

enter image description here

I clear and close the console, reopen it, and look for the value of name, it's still Bob.

enter image description here

What's the best way to clear these out?

26

What you are affecting when declaring any variables or functions within the developer console is the global execution context, which for web browsers is window.

When you clear() the console you are telling Chrome to remove all visible history of these operations, not clear the objects that you have attached to window.

To do this you must manually delete each object by its reference:

delete name;
name //=> undefined

If the overhead of having to repeatedly remove multiple objects via delete is too much, store each value as a property of an object, e.g. data, that you can delete along with all properties in one statement:

var data = {};
data.name = 'Bob';
data.age = 60;
delete data;
data.name //=> ReferenceError: data is not defined
data.age //=> ReferenceError: data is not defined
  • 1
    reloading the page doesn't clear it out for me. delete name; works though. I'd rather just have a way to clear the deck completely without having to delete individual assignments. I'm not sure why refreshing doesn't work. That seems to be a popular answer. – spex5 Dec 14 '15 at 15:42
  • You're right that refreshing doesn't work - I'd never noticed that behaviour before. You could attach all data to an object, e.g. data = {}; data.name = 'Bob';. At least then you only have to do delete data;. – sdgluck Dec 14 '15 at 15:47
  • Chrome's console seems to be very inconsistent. If I am using an about:blank page to refresh, it seems to clear out the variables.. but sometimes not. What always seems to work is closing and re-opening the browser. Oh well. Good enough for now. – spex5 Dec 14 '15 at 16:06
  • 2
    var, let and const create non-configurable properties that cannot be deleted with the delete operator. The JavaScript delete operator removes a property from an object; if no more references to the same property are held, it is eventually released automatically. – Vlad Bezden Apr 7 '18 at 8:56
17

A simple solution to this problem is to wrap any code that you don't want in the global scope in an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE). All the variables assigned in the function's scope are deallocated when the function ends:

(function() {

    // Put your code here...

})();

For more info on IIFEs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immediately-invoked_function_expression

[Update]

In ES6 you can use blocks (so long as you use let instead of var):

{

    // Put your code here...

}

For more info on blocks: http://exploringjs.com/es6/ch_core-features.html#sec_from-iifes-to-blocks

5

Clearing the console doesn't clear out the variables from the memory rather it just clears the data from the user interface.

Reloading the page clears the console data. I hope that should be fine as you mentioned that you are just testing and learning javascript.

Hope that helps!

3

Just Reload for new context with clear history and old commands execution

Things have changed a lot on chrome dev tools. delete name does not help;

//for example if you have declared a variable 
`const x = 2;`
 //Now sometime later you want to use the same variable 
`const x = 5` you will get an error 
//if you try to delete it you will get false
delete x;

But a reload of page while console is still open. will refresh the console context and now the x is not available and you can redefine it. Hope this helps someone testing or trying things on the console of chrome. i use it a lot.

0

If you want to remove that variable then

delete name;
  • copied from Vlad's comment above --> var, let and const create non-configurable properties that cannot be deleted with the delete operator. The JavaScript delete operator removes a property from an object; if no more references to the same property are held, it is eventually released automatically. – Akshay Vijay Jain Feb 16 at 7:45

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