6

I want to know what are the practical differences of executing a transaction in the same database context between these 3 ways:

1) Multiple operations with one single SaveChanges(), without explicitly using a sql transaction

using (TestDbContext db = new TestDbContext())
{
    // first operation
    // second operation
    db.SaveChanges();
}

2) Multiple operations with one single SaveChanges(), using a sql transaction

using (TestDbContext db = new TestDbContext())
using (DbContextTransaction trans = db.Database.BeginTransaction())
{
     // operation 1
     // operation 2
     db.SaveChanges();    
     trans.commit();
}

3) Multiple operations with multiple SaveChanges(), using a sql transaction

using (TestDbContext db = new TestDbContext())
using (DbContextTransaction trans = db.BeginTransaction())
{
     // operation 1
     db.SaveChanges();    
     // operation 2
     db.SaveChanges();

     trans.commit();
}

In (2) and (3), if commit() is supposed to actually execute requested sql queries to database, is it really different, say, save changes for each operation or save changes for all operation at once?

And if (1) can also allow multiple operations to be safely executed in the same database context so what's the main use of manually starting a transaction? I'd say we can manually provide try/catch block to roll back the transaction if something bad happens, but AFAIK, SaveChanges() also covers it, automatically, at least with SQLServer.

** UPDATED: Another thing is: Should I make db context and transaction variables class-level or these should be local to containing methods only?

2 Answers 2

4

If you do not start a transaction, it is implicit. Meaning, all SaveChanges() you perform will be available in the database immediately after the call.

If you start a transaction, SaveChanges() still performs the updates, but the data is not available to other connections until a commit is called.

You can test this yourself by setting break points, creating new objects, adding them to the context, and performing a SaveChanges(). You will see the ID property will have a value after that call, but there will be no corresponding row in the database until you perform a commit on the transaction.

As far as your second question goes, it really depends on concurrency needs, what your class is doing and how much data you're working with. It's not so much a scoping issue as it is a code execution issue.

Contexts are not thread safe, so as long as you only have one thread in your application access the context, you can make it at a broader scope. But then, if other instances of the application are accessing the data, you're going to have to make sure you refresh the data to the latest model. You also should consider that the more of the model you have loaded into memory, the slower saves are going to be over time.

I tend to create my contexts as close to the operations that are to be performed as possible, and dispose them soon after.

9
  • That's obvious, but I mean what are the differences if the transaction is actually executed. Of course a transaction in cases (2) and (3) won't be executed until a commit() is called.
    – tab87vn
    Dec 14, 2015 at 17:20
  • I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to comprehend. But if you don't specify a transaction, one still exists. It's just basically wrapped around each sql statement that EF creates at the server. Dec 14, 2015 at 18:20
  • Exactly, you have the point "if you don't specify one transaction, one still exists". However implicit or explicit triggering of transaction, as I can see, brings no practical differences, i mean, anything that impacts the development flexibility, system performance or whatever. For example, is there anything that I can do if I start the transaction and commit changes myself (logging, benchmarking, etc.) that i cannot when calling the SaveChanges() to automate everything?
    – tab87vn
    Dec 14, 2015 at 23:55
  • 1
    The default behavior is "one size fits most", so for whatever your case is, it might be true. But there are some cases where you need a transaction (for row locking on models that may or may not perform an update, or that you need to know an ID ahead of time for some other reason than the relationship management by EF but before all rows are committed). Or maybe you're mixing a EF operation with a non-EF operation by means of a common transaction. Plus PaulG's answer below illustrates a good point. Dec 15, 2015 at 0:07
  • 1
    They are almost the same. In example 1, the implicit transaction is created at SaveChanges(). EF doesn't create a transaction for queries, so any read operations prior to that won't include a transaction. In example 2, you're creating it at the start of the operation, so depending on the isolation level setting, rows could be locking much earlier by reading them. Dec 15, 2015 at 0:40
2

Your question doesn't really seem to be about entity framework at all, and is more regarding sql transactions. A sql transaction is a single 'atomic' change. That is to say that either all the changes are committed, or none are committed.

You don't really have an example which covers the scenario, but if you added another example like:

using (TestDbContext db = new TestDbContext())
{
     // operation 1
     db.SaveChanges();    
     // operation 2
     db.SaveChanges();
}

...in this example, if your first operation saved successfully, but the second operation failed, you could have a situation where data committed at the first step is potentially invalid.

That's why you would use a sql transaction, to wrap both SaveChanges into a single operation that means either all data is committed, or none is committed.

2
  • Hi, the question is about using transaction within EF to be exact. I thought DbContext and DbContextTransaction are from EF exclusively, no? The code snippet i gave might represent a typical situation where several changes are made to several db tables probably (let's say creating a new order involves, (1) inserting an Order record and (2) inserting an OrderDetail record. And as you said, a transaction to create order is done iff (1)&(2) are both executed, or none otherwise.
    – tab87vn
    Dec 14, 2015 at 23:34
  • I clearly see the difference between your example and mine and know how transaction matters here, yes, the atomicity. Yet I don't clearly see the point of manually manipulating a transaction rather than to explicitly trigger the rollback when sh*t happens (with try/catch). According to this article msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/dn456843.aspx, explicitly using EF's DbContextTransaction allows multiple operations to be executed in the same context, but even in the example (1) of mine, it seems that we can execute as many ops as we want until the SaveChanges() is called.
    – tab87vn
    Dec 14, 2015 at 23:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.