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I am trying to block IPs that have many port 25 connections (spam)

I have the following command:

netstat -an|grep :25| awk {'print $4'} | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n

That produces output like:

      1
  1 127.0.0.1
  2 185.11.11.11
  10 185.11.11.22
  20 185.11.11.33
  50 185.11.11.44

And i would like to filter only the rows where column one is bigger than 15.

Thank you

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5 Answers 5

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If you don't need the total number of connections but just the list of IPs, this line will do:

netstat -an | awk '$4~/:25/{gsub(":25","",$4); s[$4]++; if(s[$4]==15){print $4}}'

$4~/:25/ filters lines that contain ':25' (equivalent to the grep in your line)

gsub(":25","",$4) removes the port number from the IP address (field 4)

s[$4]++ increases the counter for the given IP

if(s[$4]==15){print $4} prints the IP if the count equals 15

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awk can handle most of the things thus you can avoid so many piped commands. You can eliminate all the commands with single gnu-awk command like this:

netstat -an | awk 'BEGIN { PROCINFO["sorted_in"] = "@val_num_desc" }
$4 ~ /:25$/ && split($4, a, ":") == 2 {
   seen[a[1]]++
}
END {
   for (i in seen)
      if (seen[i] > 15)
         print seen[i], i
}'

Breakup:

PROCINFO["sorted_in"] = "@val_num_desc"  # used for sorting an array by value
                                         # in numerical descending order
split                                    # used to get IP address by discarding port num
$4 ~ /:25$/                              # to search a particular port in netstat output                     
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  • IMO piped command are more confusing, more error prone and hugely inefficient. These is no confusion in this awk command for someone who spends sometime on awk manuals/guides.
    – anubhava
    Commented Dec 15, 2015 at 10:48
  • I use awk all the time. Pipes can be confusing but in OP's, it is far clearer what is intended than your awk script.
    – 123
    Commented Dec 15, 2015 at 10:52
  • That might be your opinion but those piped commands were not clear to me until I ran them myself to see what each one was doing.
    – anubhava
    Commented Dec 15, 2015 at 10:54
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Just append a pipe with awk '$1>15':

netstat -an|grep :25| awk {'print $4'} | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n | awk '$1>15'
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The command netstat -an | head -n 4 produces this output here:

Active Internet connections (servers and established)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address           Foreign Address         State      
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:715             0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN     
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:2137          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN  

Which means that field number 4 is "Local Adress". I will assume that what you want is the list of "Foreign Address" (field #5).

Also, you are showing Version 4 IP addresses. Probably a netstat -4an would work better for you. IPv6 addresses should have a variable amount of :.

With those two issues cleared, awk itself could do (almost) all the work:

netstat -4an | 
awk ' $5 ~ /:25/ {split($5,a,/:/); c[a[1]]++;}
      END{ for (ip in c) { if (c[ip] > 15) print(c[ip],ip) }; }
    '|sort -n
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Yet another answer.

netstat -nat | awk -F'[ :]+' '
    BEGIN{PROCINFO["sorted_in"] = "@val_num_desc"}
    $5 == "25" {count[$4]++}
    END{
        for (ip in count)
            if (count[ip]>15)
                print count[ip], ip
    }
'
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  • Thanks, @BinaryZebra! awk check removed.
    – joepd
    Commented Dec 17, 2015 at 8:11

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