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In regular expressions, what is the difference between ^[a-zA-Z]+$ and ^[a-zA-Z]*$. Also would I be able to not include it at all, either with ^[a-zA-Z]$ or ^[a-zA-Z].

I looked online and it says that + matches the preceding character one or more times and * matches the preceding character zero or one times, but I have no idea what this means in this context, or at all.

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    ^[a-zA-Z]*S may be misprint at end?
    – FLCL
    Dec 15 '15 at 14:43
  • Maybe you should have a look here http://www.regular-expressions.info/. That's a good point to start with regex. Dec 15 '15 at 14:43
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    There’s no meaningful way to compare +$ and *$. The point of + and * is that they match the previous token at least zero (*) or at least one time (+). E.g. [a-zA-Z]+ means: any character from a to z or from A to Z at least once (in a row). This would match things like abc, abCD but not the empty string or 6, etc. Dec 15 '15 at 14:46
  • ^ means that it must match the beginning. $ means it must match the end. I'm assuming there is a typo in your second statement? If so, the first statement basically says it must be a letter or word (containing uppercase or lowercase letters) to be valid, and the second one says it can be empty or a letter or word (containing uppercase or lowercase letters).
    – Sam
    Dec 15 '15 at 14:47
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+ means 1 or more * means 0 or more

So an empty string is found by ^[a-zA-Z]*$, but not by ^[a-zA-Z]+$

^[a-zA-Z]$ means EXACTLY one letter in the ranges a-z and A-Z.

a+ is a, aa, aaa, ..., aaa...aaa, etc

a* is an empty string, a, aa, aaa, ..., aaa...aaa, etc

^a$ is only a

EDIT: you can also use ^a?$ to find 0 or 1 occurence of a, so either an empty string or a

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  • OK, that makes sense! I assume it is better to use ^[a-zA-Z]*$ and [Required] rather than ^[a-zA-Z]+$ so I can have a separate error message for required? Dec 15 '15 at 15:06
  • I'm not sure whether [required] gives an error when you pass an empty string, so I would do something like if string.IsNullOrEmpty{throw new exception} or something like that. Don't use regex to check for empty strings but use built in types and methods Dec 15 '15 at 15:08
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^ and $ are anchors. They do not match anything, all they do is placing the at a particular place in the input.

  • When you have ^, you tell the engine that whatever follows it must start at the beginning of the line
  • When you have $, you tell the engine that whatever precedes it must start at the end of the line
  • When you have both ^ and $ you tell the engine that whatever is in between them must cover the entire line end-to-end.

Now it should be easy to understand the difference between [a-zA-Z]* and [a-zA-Z]+ placed between the anchors: the one with the asterisk allows empty lines, while the one with the plus insists on matching at least one character.

It should also be easy to understand what happens when you place only one anchor: essentially, you are letting the engine ignore the beginning (when ^ is missing) or the end of the line (when $ is missing) when looking for a match.

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^[a-zA-Z]+$ matches any alphabetic string (consisting of the letters a-z, large or small) of size 1 or longer. The ^ and $ characters mean "start" and "end" of the line, so they only match full lines consisting of one "word".

^[a-zA-Z]*S is similar, only the asterisk (*) means "no or any number of" the preceding character/group. The S is just an S and matches exactly one S. Basically the whole thing matches any string that starts at the beginning of a row, contains any number of letters and ends with an S. Other things can come after the S though, the line does not have to end there since $ was not used.

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^[a-zA-Z]+$

[a-zA-Z]+ match a single character present in the list below
Quantifier: + Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed [greedy]
a-z a single character in the range between a and z (case sensitive)
A-Z a single character in the range between A and Z (case sensitive)
$ assert position at end of the string

So this will match basically any string of letters Foo, Bar, sdasndjkasnd
But will not match anything else like asds2, ab c, @23 Will not match

^[a-zA-Z]*S

[a-zA-Z]* match a single character present in the list below
Quantifier: * Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed [greedy]
a-z a single character in the range between a and z (case sensitive)
A-Z a single character in the range between A and Z (case sensitive)
S matches the character S literally (case sensitive)

This will match the same but you MUST have a capital S at the end for a match.

Such as BallS, FooS, BarS will match -- ASzs will match [AS]
Balls, Foos Will not match though

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