15

I have source code of a command line C game, that waits for user's stdin, and outputs stdout. I want to give input from a text field through to the main of this C code and take the output in a text area field for example.

int mainer(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i;
    int hitme;
    char ch;
    prelim();

    if (argc > 1) { // look for -f option
        if (strcmp(argv[1], "-f")== 0) {
            coordfixed = 1;
            argc--;
            argv++;
        }
    }


    if (argc > 1) {
        fromcommandline = 1;
        line[0] = '\0';
        while (--argc > 0) {
            strcat(line, *(++argv));
            strcat(line, " ");
        }
    }
    else fromcommandline = 0;
 // some other code

}

From the example here, I should do the following:

let args = [" ", "regular", "short", ""]

var cargs = args.map { strdup($0) }
let result = mainer(Int32(args.count), &cargs)
for ptr in cargs { free(ptr) }

How could I call the main function, and keep it alive and keep giving to it arguments to make it act as command line.

2
+25

I would set up your app with a TextArea and a TextField, and provide alternatives to printf and scanf that either add text to the text area or get sent text from the textfield (maybe with an "Enter" UIButton). Then you can compile the C code and call it from Swift. Objective C is actually C way under the covers, so you should be able to to get this to run with just a little alteration.

In order to get the code to run you'll probably have to make this code run in it's own thread, and jump through some hoops to get those calls to behave correctly, but it should be doable.

0

I don’t think this is the right place to be doing this. The purpose of main is to essentially start up the app and then control passes to Application Delegate and proceeds from there. From Apple’s documentation: “With few exceptions, you should never change the implementation of the main function that Xcode provides.” https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/iPhone/Conceptual/iPhoneOSProgrammingGuide/TheAppLifeCycle/TheAppLifeCycle.html

There are other ways to mix C with Objective-C. If you need to call C the best place is likely the view where this data is needed. These links may help: Mixing C functions in an Objective-C class,

  • I'm not trying to replace the main, this is in the main app, I'm just calling it main just for referral purposes.. – MasterWizard Dec 15 '15 at 16:52
0

Don't call that function in your process.

Instead, execute your command-line game as a separate process so that you can connect it's stdin/stdout to pipes. Then you can send the content of your text field into one pipe and read back the result from the other.

Have a look at e.g. http://practicalswift.com/2014/06/25/how-to-execute-shell-commands-from-swift/.

  • I can't compile the code because the app store doesn't allow compiled programs – MasterWizard Dec 15 '15 at 16:50
  • Well you have to compile it anyway, right? – Tali Dec 15 '15 at 16:51
  • Ya but I can't include an executable in the project. – MasterWizard Dec 15 '15 at 16:52
  • Then you have two options: 1. link the C part into your program and execute it in it's own process (fork, setup the pipes, then call your routine in the child process). I don't think this will work on iOS. 2. refactor the C part so that you get one function taking an input string and returning an output string. – Tali Dec 15 '15 at 16:59
  • Ahmed, everything you submit to the store must be compiled. The issue here is that you can't compile/build the app in your Xcode project. As Tali pointed out you can call a shell script to get input from the command line. You can also include your C code as a library that called from the main app but that's more difficult. – xdeleon Dec 15 '15 at 17:00

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