13

I have two dictionaries that have the following structure:

a = {'joe': [24,32,422], 'bob': [1,42,32,24], 'jack':[0,3,222]}
b = {'joe': [24], 'bob': [1,42,32]}

I would like to retrieve the difference between these two dictionaries which in this case would result as:

{'joe': [32,422], 'bob': [24], 'jack':[0,3,222]}

I know that I could do this with a messy loop, but I would like to know how can I achieve this in a clean, pythonic fashion?

I did try: a.items() - b.items()

but I get the following error: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'dict_values' and 'dict_values'

Thanks for your help

1
  • 1
    I would like to point out that the answers using sets which are casted back to lists will destroy the order of the lists (if the order is not changed for a specific example, that's a coincidence). Since your specifications don't say that the order of the lists is unimportant, I think this fact should be noted.
    – timgeb
    Dec 18, 2015 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

12

Assuming that there would be no duplicate entries in any of your lists, you can do what you want with sets but not with lists:

>>> a = {'joe': [24,32,422], 'bob': [1,42,32,24], 'jack':[0,3,222]}
>>> b = {'joe': [24], 'bob': [1,42,32]}
>>> {key: list(set(a[key])- set(b.get(key,[]))) for key in a}
{'joe': [32, 422], 'bob': [24], 'jack': [0, 3, 222]}

Note two things:

  • I convert the set back to a list when I set it as the value
  • I use b.get rather than b[key] to handle if the key does not exist in b, but does in a

EDIT - using a for loop:

I realized that the comprehension may not be that self explanatory so this is an equivalent bit of code using a for loop:

>>> c = {}
>>> for key in a:
    c[key] = list(set(a[key]) - set(b.get(key,[])))


>>> c
{'joe': [32, 422], 'bob': [24], 'jack': [0, 3, 222]}

EDIT - lose the second set:

As Padraic Cunningham mentioned in the comments (as he so often does, bless his soul), you can make use of set.difference to avoid explicitly casting your second list to a set:

>>> c = {}
>>> for key in a:
    c[key] = list(set(a[key]).difference(b.get(key,[])))


>>> c
{'joe': [32, 422], 'bob': [24], 'jack': [0, 3, 222]}

or with list comprehension:

>>> {key: list(set(a[key]).difference(b.get(key,[]))) for key in a}
{'joe': [32, 422], 'bob': [24], 'jack': [0, 3, 222]}

or if you want to treat set.difference as a class method instead of an instance method:

>>> {key: list(set.difference(set(a[key]),b.get(key,[]))) for key in a}
{'joe': [32, 422], 'bob': [24], 'jack': [0, 3, 222]}

Though I find this a tad bit clunky and I don't really like it as much.

5
  • Perfect! Great answer and thanks again for the explanation
    – Ryan
    Dec 15, 2015 at 20:34
  • You don't need to call set twice, you can use set.difference Dec 15, 2015 at 20:55
  • @PadraicCunningham, what do you mean by that? doesnt set.diference require sets as arguments?
    – R Nar
    Dec 15, 2015 at 21:00
  • @RNar, the second arg can be any iterable, calling set means you first create a set then you check each value, using .diffeence no second set is created. list(set(a[key]).difference(b.get(key,[])) Dec 15, 2015 at 21:01
  • 1
    @PadraicCunningham I just tested that out right now, did not know that! thanks for it, will edit
    – R Nar
    Dec 15, 2015 at 21:01
7

You need to use sets:

diff = {}
for key in a:
    diff[key] = list(set(a[key]) - set(b.get(key, [])))
print diff
3

Another way is using built-in method filter:

>>> a = {'joe': [24,32,422], 'bob': [1,42,32,24], 'jack':[0,3,222]}
>>> b = {'joe': [24], 'bob': [1,42,32]}
>>> {key:filter(lambda s: s not in b.get(key,[]), a[key]) for key in a}
{'bob': [24], 'joe': [32, 422], 'jack': [0, 3, 222]}

As per Padraic Cunningham comments:

In Python 3, filter returns a generator, so, you'll need to convert it to a list, this way:

{key:list(filter(lambda s: s not in b.get(key,[]), a[key])) for key in a}

4
  • 1
    You would need list(filter... for anyone using python3 Dec 15, 2015 at 20:57
  • Yes...but OP mentioned it's 2.7
    – Iron Fist
    Dec 15, 2015 at 20:58
  • 2
    Yes but others may see the answer ;) Dec 15, 2015 at 20:58
  • 1
    Thanks @PadraicCunningham .. :)
    – Iron Fist
    Dec 15, 2015 at 21:07

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