41

I read the docs and this post... Django - Foreign Key to User model

I followed what it said and I still cannot get it to work. When I try to run the migrations I get this error in the traceback...

django.db.utils.ProgrammingError: column "author_id" cannot be cast automatically to type integer
HINT:  You might need to specify "USING author_id::integer".

I just don't know how to go about fixing that error.

from django.db import models
from django.contrib.auth.models import User

# Create your models here.
class BlogCategory(models.Model):
    '''model for categories'''

    title = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    description = models.CharField(max_length=100)


class BlogPost(models.Model):
    '''a model for a blog post'''

    author = models.ForeignKey(User)
    date = models.DateField()
    title = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    post = models.TextField()
1
  • Are you using the default user model? Please include the relevant migration file
    – Sayse
    Dec 16, 2015 at 7:38

4 Answers 4

154

Don't use the User model directly.

From the documentation

Instead of referring to User directly, you should reference the user model using django.contrib.auth.get_user_model()

When you define a foreign key or many-to-many relations to the user model, you should specify the custom model using the AUTH_USER_MODEL setting.

Example:

from django.conf import settings
from django.db import models

class Article(models.Model):
    author = models.ForeignKey(
        settings.AUTH_USER_MODEL,
        on_delete=models.CASCADE,
    )
2
  • 4
    One thing that confused me when using this answer was whether or not I needed to define the AUTH_USER_MODEL setting in settings.py. Documentation says that is not necessary - This method will return the currently active user model – the custom user model if one is specified, or User otherwise. Sep 9, 2017 at 14:21
  • 6
    The documentation states: "Django allows you to override the default user model by providing a value for the AUTH_USER_MODEL setting". Basically: if you are providing a custom User model you must provide the AUTH_USER_MODEL setting.
    – Andrew E
    Sep 10, 2017 at 4:09
3

If you created a custom User model, you would use setting.AUTH_USER_MODEL, if not you can go ahead an use User model

Referencing Django User model

0

the column "author_id" doesn't exist, looks like is the same problem from here : Django suffix ForeignKey field with _id , so to avoid this traceback you may use :

author = models.ForeignKey(User, db_column="user")
-17

I do not know the "settings.AUTH_USER_MODEL" approach but a well-known approach and commonly used is the "Auth.User" model. Something like this on your end.

from django.contrib.auth.models import User

class BlogPost(models.Model):
    '''a model for a blog post'''

    author = models.ForeignKey(User)
    date = models.DateField()
    title = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    post = models.TextField()
8
  • I tried that before looking it up and doing the other way. I get the same error
    – Joff
    Dec 16, 2015 at 7:29
  • Providing you haven't overridden the AUTH_USER_MODEL setting, the model you're referring to is the default
    – Sayse
    Dec 16, 2015 at 7:37
  • 1
    docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.9/topics/auth/customizing/…, as what the link says the "AUTH_USER_MODEL" should be the user model of a certain app, have you done that on your end? Or you might want to provide other extra details like the value of your AUTH_USER_MODEL Dec 16, 2015 at 7:41
  • I have not defined a user model for that class. Is there not some way to make it a foreign key to all users in my database?
    – Joff
    Dec 16, 2015 at 7:52
  • from django.contrib.auth.models import User author = models.ForeignKey(User) is the best answer I got for you in your case as it is what I have always used Dec 16, 2015 at 8:09

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