65

Given the following code:

struct Window{
    void show();
    //stuff
}w1, w2, w3;

struct Widget{
    void show();
    //stuff
}w4, w5, w6;

struct Toolbar{
    void show();
    //stuff
}t1, t2, t3;

I want to show a bunch of items:

for (auto &obj : {w3, w4, w5, t1})
    obj.show();

However this does not compile since the std::initializer_list<T> in the for-loop cannot deduce T and in fact there is not really a T that would fit. I don't want to create a type erasure type because of the amount of code required and the unnecessary runtime overhead. How do I correctly write my loop so that the type of obj is deduced for every item in the conceptual list separately?

8
  • 9
    Use a tuple
    – BoBTFish
    Dec 16, 2015 at 14:10
  • 2
    Is the list a run time or compile time one? you can always expand multiple calls to the same function like here Dec 16, 2015 at 14:24
  • 1
    The optimal solution depends on whether that list of things you want to iterate over is fixed or variable. Dec 16, 2015 at 14:24
  • 1
    @nwp it is acceptable to answer your own question once you figure it out, and it sounds like your solution is rather different from Richard Hodge's.
    – BoBTFish
    Dec 16, 2015 at 14:33
  • 2
    From the example, it looks like Window, Toolbar and Widget should be derived from Showable. The answers with variadic templates, while fancy, are the horror from a maintenance point of view. Maybe not that example in isolation, but a program that has 10s or 1000s of such constructs, ..., I would be out. Dec 17, 2015 at 14:00

8 Answers 8

63

In C++17 or better you'd use fold expressions, to "walk through" your heterogenous arguments applying the member function:

auto Printer = [](auto&&... args) {
    (args.show(), ...);
};

Printer(w1, w2, w3, w4, w5, w6, t1, t2, t3);

Demo

You can read more on this in my blog

5
  • 7
    @RichardHodges You don't get more modern than that Dec 16, 2015 at 15:28
  • How the heck does that work? Is the lambda equivalent to a functor containing a template function?
    – user253751
    Dec 17, 2015 at 5:28
  • @immibis that's exactly what it is Dec 17, 2015 at 6:14
  • 1
    @NikosAthanasiou Nevertheless, it is not "modern", it is "future". Modern C++ usually refers to a currently accepted standard, which is of now C++14.
    – Mikhail
    Dec 23, 2015 at 8:26
  • @Mikhail Folds are accepted into the language (the fact that the next Standard is not yet released does not change that, there will be no more committee discussions on whether to incorporate folds or not) and implementations already exist that have folds (clang and g++6 - plus you can access clang in VS15). And this not even a case like #pragma once which is not Standard c++ but all major compilers have it (folds are not an extension) Dec 23, 2015 at 8:36
39

boost::fusion is awesome but oldskool - it caters for the deficiencies in c++03.

c++11's variadic template expansion to the rescue!

#include <iostream>

struct Window{
    void show() {
        std::cout << "Window\n";
    }
    //stuff
}w1, w2, w3;

struct Widget{
    void show() {
        std::cout << "Widget\n";
    }
    //stuff
}w4, w5, w6;

struct Toolbar{
    void show()
    {
        std::cout << "Toolbar\n";
    }
    //stuff
}t1, t2, t3;


template<class...Objects>
void call_show(Objects&&...objects)
{
    using expand = int[];
    (void) expand { 0, ((void)objects.show(), 0)... };
}

auto main() -> int
{
    call_show(w3, w4, w5, t1);
    return 0;
}

expected output:

Window
Widget
Widget
Toolbar

another, more generic way (requires c++14):

// note that i have avoided a function names that look like
// one in the standard library.

template<class Functor, class...Objects>
void for_all(Functor&& f, Objects&&... objects)
{
    using expand = int[];
    (void) expand { 0, (f(std::forward<Objects>(objects)), 0)... };

}

called like so:

for_all([](auto& thing) { thing.show(); }, w3, w4, w5, t1);
8
  • 3
    Funny how you consider boost::fusion oldskool, yet you use a C-style cast. Double standards? Dec 16, 2015 at 14:56
  • 5
    @MaximEgorushkin :) this is one of the few times when a c-style cast is appropriate, but I can modify it to not use one if necessary. The casts are there to suppress compiler warnings in case your functor returns a value (which is then unused) Dec 16, 2015 at 14:57
  • 2
    @MaximEgorushkin I of course agree with you. There is no place for c-style casts in almost any code. the static_cast version would look like this: static_cast<void>(expand { 0, (static_cast<void>(objects.show()), 0)... }); Not sure whether that improves clarity or reduces it. What do you think? Dec 16, 2015 at 15:58
  • 3
    You need the (void) cast in the braced-init-list to suppress overloaded commas anyway.
    – T.C.
    Dec 16, 2015 at 17:17
  • 3
    I wonder why you: 1. Use trailing-return-type exactly once, and that for main of all possibilities. 2. Don't take advantage of the implicit return 0; in main. Dec 16, 2015 at 18:56
21

Another option is to use boost::tuple or std::tuple and boost::fusion::for_each algorithm:

#include <boost/fusion/algorithm/iteration/for_each.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/adapted/boost_tuple.hpp>

boost::fusion::for_each(
    boost::tie(w1, w2, w3, w4, w5, w6, t1, t2, t3), // by reference, not a copy
    [](auto&& t) { t.show(); } 
    );

Just out of curiosity, compared the generated assembly output of Richard Hodges's method with the above. With gcc-4.9.2 -Wall -Wextra -std=gnu++14 -O3 -march=native the produced assembly code is identical.

5
  • That's comforting to know. on my installation of apple clang 7.0 with -O3, the compiler has inlined everything into a series of calls to cout::operator<<. i.e. absolutely zero overhead. If boost does that too it's a testament to the fantastic guys who maintain the library. Dec 16, 2015 at 15:23
  • @RichardHodges I agree. Easy to use, portable and as fast as non-portable solutions :))) Dec 16, 2015 at 15:24
  • Which answer is non-portable?
    – ildjarn
    Jan 1, 2016 at 5:17
  • @ildjarn This answer works for C++98 and on. Provided the lambda is replaced with a callable object, Jan 1, 2016 at 7:35
  • Ah, between C++ standard versions then; I thought you meant someone's answer was compiler or platform-specific, and I wasn't seeing it.
    – ildjarn
    Jan 1, 2016 at 23:59
15

Based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/6894436/3484570 this works without creating an extra function, boost or inheritance.

Header:

#include <tuple>
#include <utility> 

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I == sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  for_each(const std::tuple<Tp...> &, FuncT) // Unused arguments are given no names.
  { }

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I < sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  for_each(const std::tuple<Tp...>& t, FuncT f)
  {
    f(std::get<I>(t));
    for_each<I + 1, FuncT, Tp...>(t, f);
  }

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I == sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  for_each(std::tuple<Tp...> &&, FuncT) // Unused arguments are given no names.
  { }

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I < sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  for_each(std::tuple<Tp...>&& t, FuncT f)
  {
    f(std::get<I>(t));
    for_each<I + 1, FuncT, Tp...>(std::move(t), f);
  }

.cpp:

struct Window{
    void show(){}
    //stuff
}w1, w2, w3;

struct Widget{
    void show(){}
    //stuff
}w4, w5, w6;

struct Toolbar{
    void show(){}
    //stuff
}t1, t2, t3;

int main() {
    for_each(std::tie(w3, w4, w5, t1), [](auto &obj){
        obj.show();
    });
}
2
  • 4
    you are copying w3, w4, w5, t1 when calling make_tuple. it seems like too much of an overhead to copy instances just to print them. Demo Dec 16, 2015 at 18:20
  • 1
    @LorahAttkins You are right. Fortunately it also works with std::tie, so the copies are avoidable. Fixed.
    – nwp
    Dec 16, 2015 at 20:16
11

Window, Widget and Toolbar share common interface, so you can create abstract class and make other classes inherit from it:

struct Showable {
    virtual void show() = 0; // abstract method
};

struct Window: Showable{
    void show();
    //stuff
}w1, w2, w3;

struct Widget: Showable{
    void show();
    //stuff
}w4, w5, w6;

struct Toolbar: Showable{
    void show();
    //stuff
}t1, t2, t3;

Then, you can create array of pointers to Showable, and iterate over it:

int main() {
    Showable *items[] = {&w3, &w4, &w5, &t1};
    for (auto &obj : items)
        obj->show();
}

See it working online

5
  • 3
    That comes with a runtime cost (maybe the calls get devirtualized), requires modification of all classes and it is not feasible to create a common base class for every function. Additionally it doesn't work for buildins, member variables and std-containers with .size(). But generally you are right, this is the traditional solution.
    – nwp
    Dec 16, 2015 at 16:13
  • For runtime dispatch, why not just std::bind the member function calls into an array of std::function<void()>? No virtual inheritance on the widget required. Dec 16, 2015 at 16:25
  • @nwp: It comes at a tiny, tiny, tiny, microscopic runtime cost that mostly vanishes within loops or when the show-function is non-trivial. Your solution comes at a paytime cost. In a business, it's in many cases the more expensive solution, both at programming-time as well as maintenance-time. All solutions have their advantages and disadvantages. Does tie() still work once the customer wishes to have flexible user interfaces, for example as seen million times in typical dashboards? Dec 17, 2015 at 14:06
  • I'm up-voting this regardless of how OP find run-time overhead annoying, because this also make maintenance of software overall much better, it also relate the three classes which are not arbitrary classes that has nothing to do with each others except for having a show function, which is good for a well engineered system. Also it ensure input follows the interface forcing it to have the required function preventing potential issue where it should never.
    – Khaled.K
    Dec 23, 2015 at 9:30
  • @KhaledAKhunaifer : It's also intrusive – is it not silly to change an entire class hierarchy just so someone can have a more "conventional" for-loop somewhere?
    – ildjarn
    Jan 1, 2016 at 5:20
8

I recommend Boost.Hana, which IMHO is the best and most flexible template meta-programming library available.

#include <boost/hana/ext/std/tuple.hpp>
#include <boost/hana.hpp>

namespace hana = boost::hana;

hana::for_each(std::tie(w3, w4, w5, t1), [](auto& obj) { obj.show(); });
12
  • @Richard There may be a std::tie equivalent in the library, but I don't have the time to find it right now. If I find one I'll update. Dec 16, 2015 at 15:50
  • May be it is the best and most flexible but this usage looks too verbose. Dec 16, 2015 at 15:53
  • @Maxim There you are :) Dec 16, 2015 at 17:15
  • Now, how is this better than using boost::fusion? Dec 16, 2015 at 17:25
  • 3
    @Ruslan it's on GitHub in the boostorg account. I downloaded and installed it I to my local boost directory last night. Very easy if you're familiar with cmake. It's a very nice library. Now I'm trying to think of a real problem to solve with it :) Dec 17, 2015 at 9:14
4

I think boost::variant is worth mentioning. All the more it has chances to become std::variant in C++17.

int main()
{
  std::vector<boost::variant<Window*, Widget*, Toolbar*>> items = { &w1, &w4, &t1 };

  for (const auto& item : items)
  {
    boost::apply_visitor([](auto* v) { v->show(); }, item);
  }
  return 0;
}
4
  • I love variants, but this is just an unnecessary indirection. std::tuple is already in C++11.
    – ildjarn
    Jan 1, 2016 at 5:26
  • How do you suggest to use std::tuple here?
    – Mikhail
    Jan 1, 2016 at 12:39
  • boost::fusion::for_each. I mean, if we're bringing in Boost either way, we may as well stick with the most appropriate data structure. :-]
    – ildjarn
    Jan 2, 2016 at 0:00
  • @ildjarn Agree, this might be a more appropriate option.
    – Mikhail
    Jan 4, 2016 at 12:25
0

A late answer but here is general solution with C++14 which works like the boost::fusion::for_each but doesn't require Boost:

#include <tuple>

namespace detail {
template<typename Tuple, typename Function, std::size_t... Is>
void tuple_for_each_impl(Tuple&& tup, Function&& fn, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
    using dummy = int[];
    static_cast<void>(dummy {
        0, (static_cast<void>(fn(std::get<Is>(std::forward<Tuple>(tup)))), 0)...
    });
}
}

template<typename Function, typename... Args>
void tuple_for_each(std::tuple<Args...>&& tup, Function&& fn) {
    detail::tuple_for_each_impl(std::forward<std::tuple<Args...>>(tup),
            std::forward<Function>(fn), std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{});
}

int main() {
    tuple_for_each(std::tie(w1, w2, w3, w4, w5, w6, t1, t2, t3), [](auto&& arg) {
        arg.show();
    });
}

If you want to achieve more or less the same thing without the std::tuple, you can create a single-function variant of the above code:

#include <utility>

template<typename Function, typename... Args>
void va_for_each(Function&& fn, Args&&... args) {
    using dummy = int[];
    static_cast<void>(dummy {
        0, (static_cast<void>(fn(std::forward<Args>(args))), 0)...
    });
}

int main() {
    auto action = [](auto&& arg) { arg.show(); };
    va_for_each(action, w1, w2, w3, w4, w5, w6, t1, t2, t3);
}

The drawback of the second example is that it requires to specify the processing function first, therefore doesn't have the same look like the well known std::for_each. Anyway with my compiler (GCC 5.4.0) using -O2 optimization level, they produce the same assembly output.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.