7

I'm reading Simon Thompson's Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming, and I'm wondering how does this work:

perms [] = [[]]
perms xs = [ x:ps | x <- xs , ps <- perms ( xs\\[x] ) ]

I can't seem to grasp how that perms( xs\\[x] ) is supposed to function. The trace of a two element list shows:

perms [2,3]
  [ x:ps | x <- [2,3] , ps <- perms ( [2,3] \\ [x] ) ]       exe.1
  [ 2:ps | ps <- perms [3] ] ++ [ 3:ps | ps <- perms [2] ]   exe.2
  ...

How do you go from exe.1 to exe.2?

  • Why the downvote? – Evan Carroll Aug 7 '10 at 22:21
  • 2
    You know what, I'm an idiot. That was the first trace I've seen of list comprehension. The trace shows all elements of the list to be created one at one time. I don't know why I was thinking that the third row down was the second element of the list to be created. – Evan Carroll Aug 7 '10 at 22:46
4

It basically says:

  1. Take any x from list xs (x <- xs)
  2. Take ps that is permutation of list xs\\[x] (i.e. xs with deleted x) - perms ( xs\\[x] )
  3. Return the result.

the perms(xs\\[x]) is recursive call that deletes x from xs.

4

Well, it just inserts 2 and 3 respectively into [2,3] \\ [x]. So you have

[ 2:ps | ps <- perms ([2,3] \\ [2]) ] ++ [ 3:ps | ps <- perms ([2,3] \\ [3]) ]

And since \\ is the difference operator, i.e. it returns the elements of the first list which are not in the second list, the result is [3] and [2] respectively.

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