1

When creating a basic table, the primary key name is auto generated. I would have thought dropping the constraint on the primary key column would have been enough.

CREATE TABLE TableExample
(
    TEID Int NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY
);

/** The only way to remove the constraint: **/
ALTER TABLE TableExample DROP CONSTRAINT PK__TableExa__B7FF674D29126160;

EDIT: How can I name this myself?

  • What is the question / problem? – Amit Dec 16 '15 at 23:20
  • Sql server gives it a name by default, there is a syntax to name it yourself – Sam Segers Dec 16 '15 at 23:20
  • Ah, so you you can name the Primary Key Field and the primary key itself. – Peter_James Dec 16 '15 at 23:23
  • All constraints are given a "weird" generated name by default. I've posted an example how to pick one yourself for the primary key. – Sam Segers Dec 16 '15 at 23:25
4
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TableExample] 
(
     [TEID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
     CONSTRAINT [PK_TableExample] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([TEID] ASC)
)
0

Or as a shorter alternative to Sam's response, if your primary key is on a single column (which is most often is), you could also use this:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TableExample] 
(
     [TEID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL
          CONSTRAINT [PK_TableExample] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
     OtherColumn1 INT,
     OtherColumn2 DATE,
     .....
)

You can define the constraint and its name directly "inline" with the column. This works for other constraints, too (like default constraints or check constraints). This however does not work if your primary key, foreign key or other constraint is defined over more than one column.

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