1

Porting a "C" ARM Cortex M3 project from IAR Embedded workbench to GCC, using arm-none-eabi toolchain from https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded on Windows platform.

There's a global variable providing a table of re-assignable interrupt vectors that needs to be positioned with a particular alignment and doesn't require initialization from the "C" startup, which in the IAR code is achieved by forcing it to a hardcoded memory location using IAR specific directives as follows (note that the variable doesn't need to be forced to any particular location, it's the alignment that matters)

#pragma location=ADDR_VECTOR_TABLE
static __no_init isr_ptr_t vector_table[INTERRUPT_SOURCE_TOTAL];

I'm trying to achieve the same in the GCC code by defining a RAM section named ".noinit" in my linker script and using __attribute__ directives to place my variable in the ".noinit" section (so it doesn't default to to ".bss") and force alignment as follows:

static __attribute__((section (".noinit"), aligned(0x100))) isr_ptr_t vector_table[INTERRUPT_SOURCE_TOTAL];

however despite the build appearing to have completed OK there's no sign of vector_table in the generated map file (not at the point of being able to load binary onto target and try it out yet).

Funny thing is that either of the two __attribute__ directives appear to work as expected when used in isolation,

static __attribute__((section (".noinit")) isr_ptr_t vector_table[INTERRUPT_SOURCE_TOTAL];

results in vector_table appearing in the ".noinit" section in the map file, while

static __attribute__((aligned(0x100))) isr_ptr_t vector_table[INTERRUPT_SOURCE_TOTAL]; 

results in vector_table appearing in the ".bss" section with the requested alignment honored.

Tried specifying the two directives individually as follows:

static __attribute__((section (".noinit"))) __attribute__((aligned(0x100))) isr_ptr_t vector_table[INTERRUPT_SOURCE_TOTAL];

but it made no difference.

Any ideas?

  • I don't think it matters to your question, but it seems like you're missing a closing paren in the first __attribute__((section (".noinit")). – John Zwinck Dec 17 '15 at 4:27
  • What GCC are you using exactly? I tried just now on x86_64 with GCC 4.8.3 and I don't see anything going wrong: I see vector_table in the output of objdump -x and it is in .noinit even if I add the alignment attribute (i.e. the alignment attribute seems to change nothing). You might consider just leaving the alignment attribute off until you can test the whole thing works otherwise. – John Zwinck Dec 17 '15 at 4:37
  • Using latest arm-none-eabi-gcc from launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded, which is pretty much 4.9.3. Haven't checked with objdump, was just looking at linker map file, will try it out. – Richard Lang Dec 17 '15 at 7:17
  • Ran objdump -x and vector_table is present in object file regardless regardless. The difference I was seeing seems to be related to whether vector_table is declared as static or not. When placed in ".bss" section vector_table is referenced by name from the map file even when static. When placed in ".noinit" it is only mentioned when not declared static, however the space reserved for it (tagged with name of compilation unit it comes from) is there regardless. – Richard Lang Dec 17 '15 at 19:40
  • So is your problem solved now...or not? Sorry I'm not entirely clear. – John Zwinck Dec 18 '15 at 2:11
0

Ran objdump -x and vector_table is present in object file regardless regardless. The difference I was seeing seems to be related to whether vector_table is declared as static or not. When placed in ".bss" section vector_table is referenced by name from the map file even when static. When placed in ".noinit" it is only mentioned when not declared static, however the space reserved for it (tagged with name of compilation unit it comes from) is there regardless.
Yeah, so no actual problem as it turned out, I was just confused by the map file representation of statics differing depending upon what segment they were placed in. – Richard Lang

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.