3

I have a very simple script which mocks time using Test::MockTime, but the output of time call is different in two parts of the code. Here is the script:

package mocker;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub abcd {
    print "in abcd, time is " . time . "\n";
}

BEGIN {
    use Test::MockTime qw(set_absolute_time restore_time);
    set_absolute_time(0);
};

sub do_mock {
    print "Current epoch in do_mock is: " . time . "\n";
    abcd;
    restore_time();
}

1;

I call mocker::do_mock in my script:

use strict;
use warnings;

use mocker;

mocker::do_mock;

I expect output to have "0" as current time in both print statements but strangely I have this output:

Current epoch in do_mock is: 0
in abcd, time is 1450343385

So, WHY in abcd time is restored to current time?

  • It has to do with the order. If you put the BEGIN block above abcd it works as you expect. – bolav Dec 17 '15 at 9:38
  • @bolav yes. That's right but in a big project with thousands of files, this is not possible as the perl module may have loaded Test::MockTime at any place in the file (And that's the situation I am confronted with). – mahdix Dec 18 '15 at 1:27
  • "the perl module may have loaded Test::MockTime at any place in the file" Just make sure you have use Test::MockTime; in your script before any other use Module; statements. This will work even if your script uses modules that use other modules that use other modules. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 18 '15 at 15:25
2

The documentation for Test::MockTime explains that "it overrides localtime, gmtime and time at compile time." So:

print "Before: " . time; # Uses CORE::time()

use Test::MockTime;      # Override time()

print "After: " . time;  # Uses overridden time()

You can see this using B::Deparse:

$ perl -MO=Deparse foo
print 'Before: ' . time;
use Test::MockTime;
print 'After: ' . &CORE::GLOBAL::time();
foo syntax OK

The second call to time() actually uses CORE::GLOBAL::time(), which is the overridden version.


To fix, make sure Test::MockTime is compiled before you call time():

package mocker;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Test::MockTime qw(set_absolute_time restore_time);

sub abcd {
    print "in abcd, time is " . time . "\n";
}

BEGIN {
    set_absolute_time(0);
};

sub do_mock {
    print "Current epoch in do_mock is: " . time . "\n";
    abcd;
    restore_time();
}

1;
1

You can see this answer to better understand how a BEGIN block woks.

The point here is that it's executed before the main body, but it also has to be compiled. This means that the order in which you put your declarations and your BEGIN block is relevant.

  • The issue isn't actually the placement of the BEGIN block, it's the placement of use Test::MockTime; – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 17 '15 at 18:10

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