117

I have a set of data and I want to compare which line describes it best (polynomials of different orders, exponential or logarithmic).

I use Python and Numpy and for polynomial fitting there is a function polyfit(). But I found no such functions for exponential and logarithmic fitting.

Are there any? Or how to solve it otherwise?

165

For fitting y = A + B log x, just fit y against (log x).

>>> x = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> y = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> numpy.polyfit(numpy.log(x), y, 1)
array([ 8.46295607,  6.61867463])
# y ≈ 8.46 log(x) + 6.62

For fitting y = AeBx, take the logarithm of both side gives log y = log A + Bx. So fit (log y) against x.

Note that fitting (log y) as if it is linear will emphasize small values of y, causing large deviation for large y. This is because polyfit (linear regression) works by minimizing ∑iY)2 = ∑i (YiŶi)2. When Yi = log yi, the residues ΔYi = Δ(log yi) ≈ Δyi / |yi|. So even if polyfit makes a very bad decision for large y, the "divide-by-|y|" factor will compensate for it, causing polyfit favors small values.

This could be alleviated by giving each entry a "weight" proportional to y. polyfit supports weighted-least-squares via the w keyword argument.

>>> x = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> y = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> numpy.polyfit(x, numpy.log(y), 1)
array([ 0.10502711, -0.40116352])
#    y ≈ exp(-0.401) * exp(0.105 * x) = 0.670 * exp(0.105 * x)
# (^ biased towards small values)
>>> numpy.polyfit(x, numpy.log(y), 1, w=numpy.sqrt(y))
array([ 0.06009446,  1.41648096])
#    y ≈ exp(1.42) * exp(0.0601 * x) = 4.12 * exp(0.0601 * x)
# (^ not so biased)

Note that Excel, LibreOffice and most scientific calculators typically use the unweighted (biased) formula for the exponential regression / trend lines. If you want your results to be compatible with these platforms, do not include the weights even if it provides better results.


Now, if you can use scipy, you could use scipy.optimize.curve_fit to fit any model without transformations.

For y = A + B log x the result is the same as the transformation method:

>>> x = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> y = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> scipy.optimize.curve_fit(lambda t,a,b: a+b*numpy.log(t),  x,  y)
(array([ 6.61867467,  8.46295606]), 
 array([[ 28.15948002,  -7.89609542],
        [ -7.89609542,   2.9857172 ]]))
# y ≈ 6.62 + 8.46 log(x)

For y = AeBx, however, we can get a better fit since it computes Δ(log y) directly. But we need to provide an initialize guess so curve_fit can reach the desired local minimum.

>>> x = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> y = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> scipy.optimize.curve_fit(lambda t,a,b: a*numpy.exp(b*t),  x,  y)
(array([  5.60728326e-21,   9.99993501e-01]),
 array([[  4.14809412e-27,  -1.45078961e-08],
        [ -1.45078961e-08,   5.07411462e+10]]))
# oops, definitely wrong.
>>> scipy.optimize.curve_fit(lambda t,a,b: a*numpy.exp(b*t),  x,  y,  p0=(4, 0.1))
(array([ 4.88003249,  0.05531256]),
 array([[  1.01261314e+01,  -4.31940132e-02],
        [ -4.31940132e-02,   1.91188656e-04]]))
# y ≈ 4.88 exp(0.0553 x). much better.

comparison of exponential regression

  • 2
    @Tomas: Right. Changing the base of log just multiplies a constant to log x or log y, which doesn't affect r^2. – kennytm Aug 8 '10 at 11:20
  • 4
    This will give greater weight to values at small y. Hence it is better to weight contributions to the chi-squared values by y_i – Rupert Nash Aug 8 '10 at 16:54
  • 14
    This solution is wrong in the traditional sense of curve fitting. It won't minimize the summed square of the residuals in linear space, but in log space. As mentioned before, this effectively changes the weighting of the points -- observations where y is small will be artificially overweighted. It's better to define the function (linear, not the log transformation) and use a curve fitter or minimizer. – santon Jan 5 '16 at 19:48
  • 3
    @santon Addressed the bias in exponential regression. – kennytm Mar 18 '17 at 13:57
  • 2
    @wordsforthewise polyfit weights by , so there's no conflict between this answer and Wolfram. Note the statement For gaussian uncertainties, use 1/sigma (not 1/sigma**2). – kennytm Oct 5 '18 at 7:01
91

You can also fit a set of a data to whatever function you like using curve_fit from scipy.optimize. For example if you want to fit an exponential function (from the documentation):

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit

def func(x, a, b, c):
    return a * np.exp(-b * x) + c

x = np.linspace(0,4,50)
y = func(x, 2.5, 1.3, 0.5)
yn = y + 0.2*np.random.normal(size=len(x))

popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, x, yn)

And then if you want to plot, you could do:

plt.figure()
plt.plot(x, yn, 'ko', label="Original Noised Data")
plt.plot(x, func(x, *popt), 'r-', label="Fitted Curve")
plt.legend()
plt.show()

(Note: the * in front of popt when you plot will expand out the terms into the a, b, and c that func is expecting.)

  • 2
    Nice. Is there a way to check how good a fit we got? R-squared value? Are there different optimization algorithm parameters that you can try to get a better (or faster) solution? – user391339 May 20 '16 at 3:32
  • For goodness of fit, you can throw the fitted optimized parameters into the scipy optimize function chisquare; it returns 2 values, the 2nd of which is the p-value. – MPath Apr 1 '17 at 10:14
40

I was having some trouble with this so let me be very explicit so noobs like me can understand.

Lets say that we have a data file or something like that

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit
import numpy as np
import sympy as sym

"""
Generate some data, let's imagine that you already have this. 
"""
x = np.linspace(0, 3, 50)
y = np.exp(x)

"""
Plot your data
"""
plt.plot(x, y, 'ro',label="Original Data")

"""
brutal force to avoid errors
"""    
x = np.array(x, dtype=float) #transform your data in a numpy array of floats 
y = np.array(y, dtype=float) #so the curve_fit can work

"""
create a function to fit with your data. a, b, c and d are the coefficients
that curve_fit will calculate for you. 
In this part you need to guess and/or use mathematical knowledge to find
a function that resembles your data
"""
def func(x, a, b, c, d):
    return a*x**3 + b*x**2 +c*x + d

"""
make the curve_fit
"""
popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, x, y)

"""
The result is:
popt[0] = a , popt[1] = b, popt[2] = c and popt[3] = d of the function,
so f(x) = popt[0]*x**3 + popt[1]*x**2 + popt[2]*x + popt[3].
"""
print "a = %s , b = %s, c = %s, d = %s" % (popt[0], popt[1], popt[2], popt[3])

"""
Use sympy to generate the latex sintax of the function
"""
xs = sym.Symbol('\lambda')    
tex = sym.latex(func(xs,*popt)).replace('$', '')
plt.title(r'$f(\lambda)= %s$' %(tex),fontsize=16)

"""
Print the coefficients and plot the funcion.
"""

plt.plot(x, func(x, *popt), label="Fitted Curve") #same as line above \/
#plt.plot(x, popt[0]*x**3 + popt[1]*x**2 + popt[2]*x + popt[3], label="Fitted Curve") 

plt.legend(loc='upper left')
plt.show()

the result is: a = 0.849195983017 , b = -1.18101681765, c = 2.24061176543, d = 0.816643894816

Raw data and fitted function

  • 7
    y = [np.exp(i) for i in x] is very slow; one reason numpy was created was so you could write y=np.exp(x). Also, with that replacement, you can get rid of your brutal force section. In ipython, there is the %timeit magic from which In [27]: %timeit ylist=[exp(i) for i in x] 10000 loops, best of 3: 172 us per loop In [28]: %timeit yarr=exp(x) 100000 loops, best of 3: 2.85 us per loop – esmit Apr 4 '14 at 16:33
  • 1
    Thank you esmit, you are right, but the brutal force part I still need to use when I'm dealing with data from a csv, xls or other formats that I've faced using this algorithm. I think that the use of it only make sense when someone is trying to fit a function from a experimental or simulation data, and in my experience this data always come in strange formats. – Leandro Aug 17 '14 at 0:24
  • 3
    x = np.array(x, dtype=float) should enable you to get rid of slow list comprehension. – Ajasja Nov 9 '14 at 22:19
5

Well I guess you can always use:

np.log   -->  natural log
np.log10 -->  base 10
np.log2  -->  base 2

Slightly modifying IanVS's answer:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit

def func(x, a, b, c):
  #return a * np.exp(-b * x) + c
  return a * np.log(b * x) + c

x = np.linspace(1,5,50)   # changed boundary conditions to avoid division by 0
y = func(x, 2.5, 1.3, 0.5)
yn = y + 0.2*np.random.normal(size=len(x))

popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, x, yn)

plt.figure()
plt.plot(x, yn, 'ko', label="Original Noised Data")
plt.plot(x, func(x, *popt), 'r-', label="Fitted Curve")
plt.legend()
plt.show()

This results in the following graph:

enter image description here

  • Is there a saturation value the fit approximates? If so, how can on access it? – Ben Jul 19 at 9:08

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