-8

I've seen two ways of initialising a class in Java:

Class name = new Class();

or

Class name;
name = new Class();

What is the difference between these? is it preference or is there an actual distinction in the way they will work?

  • 1
    Why would they be any different? – Rabbit Guy Dec 17 '15 at 15:29
  • The first is a short form for the second. – Mikey Dec 17 '15 at 15:33
  • @blahfunk Why would you take the time to ask that? – nicomp Dec 17 '15 at 15:33
  • Alright thanks, no need to be rude. I didn't think there was a difference but saw a tutorial online where both ways were being used so I thought I would ask to double check. – rk1012 Dec 17 '15 at 15:33
  • Note: This has nothing specifically to do with classes and applies to any variable. E.g., int x = 0; vs int x; x = 0;. – Boann Dec 17 '15 at 19:30
3

Not really. There might be instances where the second is necessary because the constructor throws an exception. If you need to use name outside the try/catch block you'll need to create it first.

Class name;

try {
    name = new Class();
} catch (Exception e) {
    do something
}

Otherwise the first is more efficient.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    P.S. If your constructor throws an exception you should probably re-write it though! – TangledUpInBlue Dec 17 '15 at 15:33
2

At first: Both code-snippets will do the same. The first code snippet is the short form of the first.

The second way could be used in some cases:

  1. Your constructor throws any kind of exception.

    In this case you would to something like that:

    Class name;
    try 
    {
        name = new Class();
    } 
    catch (Exception exp) 
    {
        exp.printStackTrace();
    }
    
  2. You want to init your variable in different ways

    Class name;
    if(//check something)
    {
        name = new Class("example1");
    } 
    else
    {
        name = new Class("example1");
    }
    

PS: Just some examples where it is usefull. There are many other ways to use that.

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1

They work the same BUT there is a time and place for each. You can break up declaration and instantiation for good reason. You may not need to instantiate: you may have code paths that don't need to instantiate the object.

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1

Class name; -> Declaration name = new Class(); -> Instanciation

The memory is reserved for the "name" object with the instanciation. So basically, no memory is reserved until you use the "new" keyword.

You can also check the generated byte code, you'll discover that the JVM does an optimization and will provide the same result for your two code snippets.

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