81

I'm using Spring Beans with annotations and I need to choose different implementation at runtime.

@Service
public class MyService {
   public void test(){...}
}

For example for windows's platform I need MyServiceWin extending MyService, for linux platform I need MyServiceLnx extending MyService.

For now I know only one horrible solution:

@Service
public class MyService {

    private MyService impl;

   @PostInit
   public void init(){
        if(windows) impl=new MyServiceWin();
        else impl=new MyServiceLnx();
   }

   public void test(){
        impl.test();
   }
}

Please consider that I'm using annotation only and not XML config.

3
  • What's wrong with @Qualifier if all your class names are different?
    – JamesENL
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 8:14
  • 5
    Mmh, if I'm not wrong, Qualifier is not evalutated runtime.
    – Tobia
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 8:16
  • True that. You probably should look at a factory pattern. See my answer below for details.
    – JamesENL
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 8:37

8 Answers 8

119

1. Implement a custom Condition

public class LinuxCondition implements Condition {
  @Override
  public boolean matches(ConditionContext context, AnnotatedTypeMetadata metadata) {
    return context.getEnvironment().getProperty("os.name").contains("Linux");  }
}

Same for Windows.

2. Use @Conditional in your Configuration class

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {
   @Bean
   @Conditional(LinuxCondition.class)
   public MyService getMyLinuxService() {
      return new LinuxService();
   }

   @Bean
   @Conditional(WindowsCondition.class)
   public MyService getMyWindowsService() {
      return new WindowsService();
   }
}

3. Use @Autowired as usual

@Service
public class SomeOtherServiceUsingMyService {

    @Autowired    
    private MyService impl;

    // ... 
}
5
  • I tried the @ Profile solution and that works for me. I think this can be also a good solution, but with @ Profile I don't need a configurator.
    – Tobia
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 9:50
  • 1
    @grep You're right. I fixed the method names. Note that you're autowiring based on type MyService using Conditional so the method names for the bean definition do not take precedence and single configuration with different method names should work.
    – nobeh
    Commented Jul 29, 2017 at 22:29
  • In this case what happens to your autowiring if both conditions are met?
    – Derek
    Commented Apr 19, 2019 at 21:42
  • 1
    What if I want to use some variable inside matches?
    – J. Doe
    Commented Oct 5, 2021 at 14:06
  • 1
    Is there a solution that doesn't need "new" so you don't have to specify all the constructor parameters but instead use dependency injection, e.g. via Lombok.
    – lilalinux
    Commented Oct 20, 2021 at 11:10
31

Let's create beautiful config.

Imagine that we have Animal interface and we have Dog and Cat implementation. We want to write write:

@Autowired
Animal animal;

but which implementation should we return?

enter image description here

So what is solution? There are many ways to solve problem. I will write how to use @Qualifier and Custom Conditions together.

So First off all let's create our custom annotation:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target({ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.FIELD, ElementType.TYPE})
public @interface AnimalType {
    String value() default "";
}

and config:

@Configuration
@EnableAutoConfiguration
@ComponentScan
public class AnimalFactoryConfig {

    @Bean(name = "AnimalBean")
    @AnimalType("Dog")
    @Conditional(AnimalCondition.class)
    public Animal getDog() {
        return new Dog();
    }

    @Bean(name = "AnimalBean")
    @AnimalType("Cat")
    @Conditional(AnimalCondition.class)
    public Animal getCat() {
        return new Cat();
    }

}

Note our bean name is AnimalBean. why do we need this bean? because when we inject Animal interface we will write just @Qualifier("AnimalBean")

Also we crated custom annotation to pass the value to our custom Condition.

Now our conditions look like this (imagine that "Dog" name comes from config file or JVM parameter or...)

   public class AnimalCondition implements Condition {

    @Override
    public boolean matches(ConditionContext conditionContext, AnnotatedTypeMetadata annotatedTypeMetadata) {
        if (annotatedTypeMetadata.isAnnotated(AnimalType.class.getCanonicalName())){
           return annotatedTypeMetadata.getAnnotationAttributes(AnimalType.class.getCanonicalName())
                   .entrySet().stream().anyMatch(f -> f.getValue().equals("Dog"));
        }
        return false;
    }
}

and finally injection:

@Qualifier("AnimalBean")
@Autowired
Animal animal;
2
  • 2
    I don't think Qualifier should be mixed with Autowired
    – GabrielBB
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 13:45
  • Why dont you think they should be mixed?
    – alex
    Commented Nov 7, 2020 at 17:17
30

You can move the bean injection into the configuration, as:

@Configuration
public class AppConfig {

    @Bean
    public MyService getMyService() {
        if(windows) return new MyServiceWin();
        else return new MyServiceLnx();
    }
}

Alternatively, you may use profiles windows and linux, then annotate your service implementations with the @Profile annotation, like @Profile("linux") or @Profile("windows"), and provide one of this profiles for your application.

5
  • I could set the Spring profile via web.xml but is it possibile to change it in a ContextListerner with a bit of code? With this I can change the profile runtime as requested.
    – Tobia
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 10:37
  • Since Spring 4(?) you have the @Conditional annotation at your disposal. @Profile will work 100%, but the Conditional should be better suited.
    – demaniak
    Commented Apr 17, 2016 at 11:01
  • @demaniak if I'm reading the docs for Conditional correctly, it sounds like it's evaluated at startup, not runtime? Commented Feb 7, 2019 at 14:46
  • @CharlesWood - yes, you are correct. But, with the addion of "@RefreshScope", and the Actuator starter, it is possible to get a reload at runtime. You would of course have to carefully consider the impact of that on a running system!
    – demaniak
    Commented Apr 5, 2019 at 15:14
  • Why would this still be called AppConfig? Technically isn't this like a factory pattern?
    – alex
    Commented Nov 11, 2020 at 15:06
18

Autowire all your implementations into a factory with @Qualifier annotations, then return the service class you need from the factory.

public class MyService {
    private void doStuff();
}

My Windows Service:

@Service("myWindowsService")
public class MyWindowsService implements MyService {

    @Override
    private void doStuff() {
        //Windows specific stuff happens here.
    }
}

My Mac Service:

@Service("myMacService")
public class MyMacService implements MyService {

    @Override
    private void doStuff() {
        //Mac specific stuff happens here
    }
}

My factory:

@Component
public class MyFactory {
    @Autowired
    @Qualifier("myWindowsService")
    private MyService windowsService;

    @Autowired
    @Qualifier("myMacService")
    private MyService macService;

    public MyService getService(String serviceNeeded){
        //This logic is ugly
        if(serviceNeeded == "Windows"){
            return windowsService;
        } else {
            return macService;
        }
    }
}

If you want to get really tricky you can use an enum to store your implementation class types, and then use the enum value to choose which implementation you want to return.

public enum ServiceStore {
    MAC("myMacService", MyMacService.class),
    WINDOWS("myWindowsService", MyWindowsService.class);

    private String serviceName;
    private Class<?> clazz;

    private static final Map<Class<?>, ServiceStore> mapOfClassTypes = new HashMap<Class<?>, ServiceStore>();

    static {
        //This little bit of black magic, basically sets up your 
        //static map and allows you to get an enum value based on a classtype
        ServiceStore[] namesArray = ServiceStore.values();
        for(ServiceStore name : namesArray){
            mapOfClassTypes.put(name.getClassType, name);
        }
    }

    private ServiceStore(String serviceName, Class<?> clazz){
        this.serviceName = serviceName;
        this.clazz = clazz;
    }

    public String getServiceBeanName() {
        return serviceName;
    }

    public static <T> ServiceStore getOrdinalFromValue(Class<?> clazz) {
        return mapOfClassTypes.get(clazz);
    }
}

Then your factory can tap into the Application context and pull instances into it's own map. When you add a new service class, just add another entry to the enum, and that's all you have to do.

 public class ServiceFactory implements ApplicationContextAware {

     private final Map<String, MyService> myServices = new Hashmap<String, MyService>();

     public MyService getInstance(Class<?> clazz) {
         return myServices.get(ServiceStore.getOrdinalFromValue(clazz).getServiceName());
     }

      public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) throws BeansException {
          myServices.putAll(applicationContext.getBeansofType(MyService.class));
      }
 }

Now you can just pass the class type you want into the factory, and it will provide you back the instance you need. Very helpful especially if you want to the make the services generic.

1
  • 2
    Good application of Delegate pattern - in theory. In practice, it introduces some overhead on extending MyService - each method added should also be implemented by MyFactory (which is BTW not Factory but Proxy). That's OK while MyService only have a method or two, but becomes tedious as MyService grows. Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 13:17
9

Simply make the @Service annotated classes conditional: That's all. No need for other explicit @Bean methods.

public enum Implementation {
    FOO, BAR
}

@Configuration
public class FooCondition implements Condition {
    @Override
    public boolean matches(ConditionContext context, AnnotatedTypeMetadata metadata) {
        Implementation implementation = Implementation.valueOf(context.getEnvironment().getProperty("implementation"));
        return Implementation.FOO == implementation;
    }
}

@Configuration
public class BarCondition implements Condition {
    @Override
    public boolean matches(ConditionContext context, AnnotatedTypeMetadata metadata) {
        Implementation implementation = Implementation.valueOf(context.getEnvironment().getProperty("implementation"));
        return Implementation.BAR == implementation;
    }
}

Here happens the magic. The condition is right where it belongs: At the implementating classes.

@Conditional(FooCondition.class)
@Service
class MyServiceFooImpl implements MyService {
    // ...
}

@Conditional(BarCondition.class)
@Service
class MyServiceBarImpl implements MyService {
    // ...
}

You can then use Dependency Injection as usual, e.g. via Lombok's @RequiredArgsConstructor or @Autowired.

@Service
@RequiredArgsConstructor
public class MyApp {
    private final MyService myService;
    // ...
}

Put this in your application.yml:

implementation: FOO

👍 Only the implementations annotated with the FooCondition will be instantiated. No phantom instantiations. 👍

2
  • Nice & clear How would one write integration tests for these? If I had an integration test for Foo, how to set implementation property = foo. Similarly for the case when implementation property = bar.
    – SGB
    Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 11:20
  • Probably the same as you would with other tests that rely on application properties
    – lilalinux
    Commented Oct 4, 2022 at 9:16
9

Just adding my 2 cents to this question. Note that one doesn't have to implement so many java classes as the other answers are showing. One can simply use the @ConditionalOnProperty. Example:

@Service
@ConditionalOnProperty(
  value="property.my.service", 
  havingValue = "foo", 
  matchIfMissing = true)
class MyServiceFooImpl implements MyService {
    // ...
}

@ConditionalOnProperty(
  value="property.my.service", 
  havingValue = "bar")
class MyServiceBarImpl implements MyService {
    // ...
}

Put this in your application.yml:

property.my.service: foo
2
  • 1
    This is the cleanest solution that leverages Spring. Notice that value is not an array of string and that the property can be overwritten by an env variable called PROPERTY_MY_SERVICE.
    – ipopa
    Commented Mar 21, 2023 at 15:36
  • 1
    This approach looks cleanest to me as well and is documented in a Spring blog: 4 Solutions for Selective Injection. Commented Mar 23, 2023 at 19:20
2

MyService.java:

public interface MyService {
  String message();
}

MyServiceConfig.java:

@Configuration
public class MyServiceConfig {

  @Value("${service-type}")
  MyServiceTypes myServiceType;

  @Bean
  public MyService getMyService() {
    if (myServiceType == MyServiceTypes.One) {
      return new MyServiceImp1();
    } else {
      return new MyServiceImp2();
    }
  }
}

application.properties:

service-type=one

MyServiceTypes.java

public enum MyServiceTypes {
  One,
  Two
}

Use in any Bean/Component/Service/etc. like:

    @Autowired
    MyService myService;
    ...
    String message = myService.message()

1
  • The getMyService() config method needs @Primary to prevent having too many implementations to choose from. Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:27
0

A solution with AOP (AspectJ)

@AutowiredCustom
public SpeedLimitService speedLimitService;

Aspect:

import org.aspectj.lang.annotation.Aspect;
import org.springframework.beans.BeansException;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContextAware;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;
import performance.context.CountryHolder;

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

/**
 */
@Aspect
@Component
public aspect AutowiredCustomFieldAspect implements ApplicationContextAware {

    private static ApplicationContext applicationContext;

    pointcut annotatedField(): get(@performance.annotation.AutowiredCustom * *);

    before(Object object): annotatedField() && target(object) {
        try {
            String fieldName = thisJoinPoint.getSignature().getName();
            Field field = object.getClass().getDeclaredField(fieldName);
            field.setAccessible(true);

            String className = field.getType().getSimpleName() + CountryHolder.getCountry().name();

            Object bean = applicationContext.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory().getBean(className);

            field.set(object, bean);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) throws BeansException {
        this.applicationContext = applicationContext;
    }

}

Beans:

@Service("SpeedLimitServiceCH")
public class SpeedLimitServiceCH implements SpeedLimitService {

    @Override
    public int getHighwaySpeedLimit() {
        return 120;
    }
}

@Service("SpeedLimitServiceDE")
public class SpeedLimitServiceDE implements SpeedLimitService {

    @Override
    public int getHighwaySpeedLimit() {
        return 200;
    }
}

pom.xml configuration

...
                 <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
                    <artifactId>aspectj-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                    <version>${aspectj-maven-plugin.version}</version>
                    <configuration>
                        <complianceLevel>${java.version}</complianceLevel>
                        <source>${maven.compiler.source}</source>
                        <target>${maven.compiler.target}</target>
                        <showWeaveInfo>true</showWeaveInfo>
                        <verbose>true</verbose>
                        <Xlint>ignore</Xlint>
                        <encoding>${project.build.sourceEncoding}</encoding>
                    </configuration>
                    <executions>
                        <execution>
                            <goals>
                                <!-- use this goal to weave all your main classes -->
                                <goal>compile</goal>
                                <!-- use this goal to weave all your test classes -->
                                <goal>test-compile</goal>
                            </goals>
                        </execution>
                    </executions>
                </plugin>
    
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </project>

Reference:
https://viktorreinok.medium.com/dependency-injection-pattern-for-cleaner-business-logic-in-your-java-spring-application-f4ace0a3cba7

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