6

I have a table created with this SQL:

CREATE TABLE `test_table` (
  `id` BIGINT UNSIGNED AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  `data` TEXT,
  `timestamp` TIMESTAMP
) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci ENGINE InnoDB;

But when I run SHOW CREATE TABLE test_table, I get:

CREATE TABLE `test_table` (
 `id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `data` text COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci,
 `timestamp` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

Why the timestamp column being assigned ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP by default? I do not know how to get rid of this. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

2
  • 2
    Go to php my admin, change 'default' option to As defined and select first option in attributes section of 'timestamp' column of 'test_table' – Nana Partykar Dec 18 '15 at 12:46
  • using phpmyadmin and altering this everytime is a heck, I have 25-30 tables created like this. And may create more in future. Is there any SQL way to stop this? – VPZ Dec 18 '15 at 12:53
1

Use a datetime field instead

Should I use field 'datetime' or 'timestamp'?

Timestamps in MySQL generally used to track changes to records, and are often updated every time the record is changed. If you want to store a specific value you should use a datetime field.

If you meant that you want to decide between using a UNIX timestamp or a native MySQL datetime field, go with the native format. You can do calculations within MySQL that way ("SELECT DATE_ADD(my_datetime, INTERVAL 1 DAY)") and it is simple to change the format of the value to a UNIX timestamp ("SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP(my_datetime)") when you query the record if you want to operate on it with PHP.

2
  • can I safely alter my table.columns to datetime from timestamp? please note, my tables have data. – VPZ Dec 18 '15 at 12:56
  • 1
    Yes, you can. In general though, I would highly recommend testing any table changes with production data in them on a test database. – thaspius Dec 18 '15 at 12:58
3

If you want that to your timestamp will be not added automatically ON UPDATE you have to define it like this

CREATE TABLE `test_table` (
   ...
   `timestamp` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
) ...
4
  • can I omit the DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP part? – VPZ Dec 18 '15 at 13:00
  • nevermind. just checked and nope, I can't! However, I used DEFAULT 0 to prevent this. – VPZ Dec 18 '15 at 13:03
  • you can use instead DEFAULT NULL, or use datetime column type LIKE: timestamp datetime DEFAULT NULL as @thaspius suggested – Armen Dec 18 '15 at 13:06
  • Declare the column as TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT NULL if you want it nullable and no auto behavior. – Michael - sqlbot Dec 18 '15 at 21:50

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