4

I've written a timer method which isn't working correctly. It is supposed to display the time elapsed while on a form, but it is counting by 2's or 3's instead of once per second. What could cause this behavior and how can I fix it?

My code:

function startTimer() {
  var minutes, seconds;
  
  setInterval(function () {
    if (!isPaused) {
      minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10);
      seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10);
      
      minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
      seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;
      
      $('#TimeLabel').text("Form Time: " + minutes + ":" + seconds);
      
      ++timer;
    }
  }, 1000);
}

The above code displays "Form Time: 00:01" then "Form Time: 00:04" then "Form Time:00:07" ect.

  • 4
    setInterval (and setTimeout) are not guaranteed to be accurate in any way. They only have to wait for a minimum of the timeout you specify, and can run any time after that. This is most noticable if the tab isn't active - browsers usually heavily throttle them in those cases. – James Thorpe Dec 18 '15 at 16:23
  • I wasn't aware of that. I suppose I'll need to write a new method to subtract from the current time and calculate the elapsed time that way. Thanks – BrianLegg Dec 18 '15 at 16:24
  • 2
    They should on the other hand not be several seconds of, generally it's just milliseconds. I think, from just quickly looking at the code, the issue is the way you're incrementing a number, and then dividing that to get the seconds etc. and you keep compounding the small errors in setTimeout until it becomes more and more, and eventually seconds. – adeneo Dec 18 '15 at 16:30
  • While what @JamesThorpe said is undoubtedly true, your webpage would have to be very slow for it to be grouping 1 second intervals together when your webpage isn't in the background. – Stryner Dec 18 '15 at 16:30
  • 1
    In case you didn't see it - @SundarSingh makes a valid point in a comment on his answer below - are you positive that startTimer is only being called once? – James Thorpe Dec 18 '15 at 16:42
3

Here's an example of what I came up with. It uses time so as not to be dependent on the accuracy of your setInterval. Hope this helps!

function startTimer(){
        var minutes,
            seconds;

        var startTime = new Date;

        setInterval(function(){

            var currentTime = new Date;
            seconds = currentTime.getSeconds() - startTime.getSeconds();

            if(seconds < 0){
                seconds += 60;
            }else if(seconds === 0){
                minutes = currentTime.getMinutes() - startTime.getMinutes();
            }

            console.log(minutes + ':' + seconds);

        }, 100);
}
startTimer();
  • Thanks, this ended up being exactly what I needed. – BrianLegg Dec 18 '15 at 19:21
  • No problem man, glad I could help. – Antonio Manente Dec 18 '15 at 19:22
0

It depends on the async nature of javascript and on the fact that it runs on a single thread.

There are many articles on the web who explain how the event loop works, so, I think that isn't necessary to explain it here.

You just need to keep in mind that: setTimeout or setInterval, or other similar instructions, will be executed at the first available time after the delay time passed as parameter.

So, window.setTimeout(function() { console.log('Hello World'); }, 1000); doesn't mean that will be executed exactly after 1000ms (1s).

It basically means wait for 100ms and when the event loop is free call the callback passed as parameter.

further reading

-1

The problem may have something to do with not declaring all of your variables. When I run this version in the console, it works properly:

function startTimer() {
  var minutes, seconds, isPaused = false, timer = 1;
  
  setInterval(function () {
    if (!isPaused) {
      minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10);
      seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10);
      
      minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
      seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;
      
      console.log("Form Time: " + minutes + ":" + seconds);
      
      timer++;
    }
  }, 1000);
}

startTimer();

-1

I have just used code in console and found it is working fine there, code is :

  var timer =1;
  var minutes, seconds;

  setInterval(function () {

  minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10);
  seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10);

  minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
  seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

  console.log("Form Time: " + minutes + ":" + seconds);

  ++timer;
  }, 1000);

So there might be something which increases the value of timer or ensure that your function startTimer called only once.

  • Hope you are running startTimer just once – Sundar Singh Dec 18 '15 at 16:38
  • Your comment here could be a lot more valid than your answer - If indeed it's being called 3 times, it would explain the behaviour. – James Thorpe Dec 18 '15 at 16:39
  • @JamesThorpe I'm just learning how to answer questions here as I'm new :) – Sundar Singh Dec 18 '15 at 16:44
  • We were all new once! The problem here is that "ensure it's only being called once" is more of a comment than a proper answer, but because you don't have 50 rep yet you can't make that comment under the question itself. Keep going - it only takes a few upvotes on some answers to get the comment everywhere privilege :) – James Thorpe Dec 18 '15 at 16:46
  • Yes I understand that , thank you. – Sundar Singh Dec 18 '15 at 16:50

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