I have a MVC website using EF for data access. The app takes in data, runs a series of calculations and stores the results. Each batch of data can have several thousand records and the calculations take on average 30 seconds - I want to run all this in the background.

So far I have Hangfire in place to trigger the batches. I then do:

var queue = new Queue<MyItem>();

// queue is populated ...

while (queue.Any())
{
    var item = queue.Dequeue();
    var task = Task.Run(() =>
    {
        using (var context = new MyDbContext())
        {
            context.MyItem.Add(item);

            // Run Calculations

           try {
               context.SaveChanges();
           }
           catch {
               // Log error
           }
        }
    }
}

When a batch is running the site either becomes completely unresponsive, or I receive 'The underlying provider failed on Open' errors.

Is there a better approach to this?

  • Do your website users need to wait for the response? Can you run the calculations then notify them when the result is ready (like email)? – Jasen Dec 18 '15 at 18:37
  • If MyDbContext has async support you should use await context.SaveChangesAsync(). This can free up your threads to handle more requests. – i3arnon Dec 18 '15 at 18:50
  • @Jasen No user notification required. At the moment there's an await Task.WhenAll() that does cleanup and logging. – Neil Dec 18 '15 at 22:31
  • @i3arnon Thanks, have changed it to SaveChangesAsync – Neil Dec 18 '15 at 22:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems that you're creating tasks using Task.Run and not waiting for them to complete. That means you'll generate a task for each item in the queue that will all run concurrently on different ThreadPool threads. This can be quite a burden that can (and probably does) affect your regular requests.

You should limit the concurrency of these task in some way. The simplest IMO is using TPL Dataflow's ActionBlock. You create the block with a delegate and options (e.g. MaxDegreeOfParallelism), post items into it and wait for it to complete:

block = new ActionBlock<MyItem>(item =>
{
    using (var context = new MyDbContext())
    {
        context.MyItem.Add(item);

        // Run Calculations

       try {
           context.SaveChanges();
       }
       catch {
           // Log error
       }
    } 
}, new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 2 });

while (queue.Any())
{
    var item = queue.Dequeue();
    block.Post(item);
}

block.Complete();
await block.Completion;
  • Why choose 2 for MaxDegreeOfParallelism and not maxdegreeofparallelism = environment.processorcount? Illustrative purposes? – Big Daddy Dec 18 '15 at 18:45
  • @BigDaddy It's just an example. I would actually even go with 1 and see if that's good enough to complete the background batches in time. ProcessorCount can take all available CPUs if the calculations are mostly CPU bound. – i3arnon Dec 18 '15 at 18:47
  • @i3arnon That's great. The calculations are CPU heavy - I've run with MaxDegreeOfParalellism at 1, 2 and Environment.ProcessorCount (4) and it seems happiest with the latter. What's the general logic for determining the right value? – Neil Dec 18 '15 at 22:38
  • @Neil If it's CPU heavy then ProcessorCount should be the maximum. If you want to leave room for more processing though, then the limit should be even lower than that. Especially since this seems like a non essential background process. – i3arnon Dec 18 '15 at 22:50

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