221

Why is the component in this simple plunk

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  template: `<div>I'm {{message}} </div>`,
})
export class App {
  message:string = 'loading :(';

  ngAfterViewInit() {
    this.updateMessage();
  }

  updateMessage(){
    this.message = 'all done loading :)'
  }
}

throwing:

EXCEPTION: Expression 'I'm {{message}} in App@0:5' has changed after it was checked. Previous value: 'I'm loading :( '. Current value: 'I'm all done loading :) ' in [I'm {{message}} in App@0:5]

when all I'm doing is updating a simple binding when my view is initiated?

12 Answers 12

230

As stated by drewmoore, the proper solution in this case is to manually trigger change detection for the current component. This is done using the detectChanges() method of the ChangeDetectorRef object (imported from angular2/core), or its markForCheck() method, which also makes any parent components update. Relevant example:

import { Component, ChangeDetectorRef, AfterViewInit } from 'angular2/core'

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  template: `<div>I'm {{message}} </div>`,
})
export class App implements AfterViewInit {
  message: string = 'loading :(';

  constructor(private cdr: ChangeDetectorRef) {}

  ngAfterViewInit() {
    this.message = 'all done loading :)'
    this.cdr.detectChanges();
  }

}

Here are also Plunkers demonstrating the ngOnInit, setTimeout, and enableProdMode approaches just in case.

  • 4
    In my case I was opening a modal. After open the modal it was showing the message "Expression ___ has changed after it was checked", so my solution was added this.cdr.detectChanges(); after open my modal. Thanks! – Jorge Casariego Sep 8 '16 at 15:38
  • Where is your declaration for the cdr property? I would expect to see a line like cdr : any or something like that under the message declaration. Just worried I've missed something? – CodeCabbie Mar 9 '17 at 10:54
  • 1
    @CodeCabbie it's in the constructor arguments. – slasky Mar 31 '17 at 23:08
  • 1
    This resolution fix my problem! Thanks a lot! Very clear and simple way. – lwozniak Oct 31 '17 at 7:26
  • 2
    This helped me - with a few modifications. I had to style li elements that were generated via ngFor loop. I needed to change the color of spans within the list items based on innerText upon clicking 'sort' which updated a bool being used as a parameter of a sort pipe (the sorted result was a copy of the data, so styles weren't getting updated with ngStyle alone). - Instead of using 'AfterViewInit', I used 'AfterViewChecked' - I also made sure to import and implement AfterViewChecked. note: setting the pipe to 'pure: false' was not working, I had to add this extra step (: – Chloe Corrigan Jul 20 '18 at 14:25
141

First, note that this exception will only be thrown when you're running your app in dev mode (which is the case by default as of beta-0): If you call enableProdMode() when bootstrapping the app, it won't get thrown (see updated plunk).

Second, don't do that because this exception is being thrown for good reason: In short, when in dev mode, every round of change detection is followed immediately by a second round that verifies no bindings have changed since the end of the first, as this would indicate that changes are being caused by change detection itself.

In your plunk, the binding {{message}} is changed by your call to setMessage(), which happens in the ngAfterViewInit hook, which occurs as a part of the initial change detection turn. That in itself isn't problematic though - the problem is that setMessage() changes the binding but does not trigger a new round of change detection, meaning that this change won't be detected until some future round of change detection is triggered somewhere else.

The takeaway: Anything that changes a binding needs to trigger a round of change detection when it does.

Update in response to all the requests for an example of how to do that: @Tycho's solution works, as do the three methods in the answer @MarkRajcok pointed out. But frankly, they all feel ugly and wrong to me, like the sort of hacks we got used to leaning on in ng1.

To be sure, there are occasional circumstances where these hacks are appropriate, but if you're using them on anything more than a very occasional basis, it's a sign that you're fighting the framework rather than fully embracing its reactive nature.

IMHO, a more idiomatic, "Angular2 way" of approaching this is something along the lines of: (plunk)

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  template: `<div>I'm {{message | async}} </div>`
})
export class App {
  message:Subject<string> = new BehaviorSubject('loading :(');

  ngAfterViewInit() {
    this.message.next('all done loading :)')
  }
}
  • 7
    Why doesn't setMessage() trigger a new round of change detection? I thought Angular 2 automatically triggered change detection when you change the value of something in the UI. – Danny Libin Dec 20 '15 at 20:11
  • 3
    @drewmoore "Anything that changes a binding needs to trigger a round of change detection when it does". How? Is it a good practice? Shouldn't everything be completed in a single run? – Birowsky Dec 25 '15 at 12:04
  • 2
    @Tycho, indeed. Since I wrote that comment, I've answered another question where I describe the 3 ways to run change detection, which includes detectChanges(). – Mark Rajcok Feb 6 '16 at 16:51
  • 3
    just to note that, in current question body, the invoked method is named updateMessage, not setMessage – superjos Aug 22 '16 at 9:53
  • 3
    @Daynil, I had the same feeling, until I read the blog given in comment under the question: blog.angularindepth.com/… It explains why this needs to be manually done. In this case, angular's change detection has a lifecycle. In case something is changing a value in between these lifecycles, then a forceful change detection needs to be run (or a settimeout - which executes in next event loop, triggering the change detection again). – Mahesh Nov 16 '17 at 2:30
40

I fixed this by adding ChangeDetectionStrategy from angular core.

import {  Component, ChangeDetectionStrategy } from '@angular/core';
@Component({
  changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush,
  selector: 'page1',
  templateUrl: 'page1.html',
})
  • This worked for me. I wonder what's the difference between this and using ChangeDetectorRef – Ari Aug 31 '17 at 4:56
  • 1
    Hmm... Then the change detector's mode will be initially set to CheckOnce (documentation) – Alex Klaus Dec 8 '17 at 4:29
  • Yes, the error/warning is gone. But it is taking way much loading time than before like 5-7 seconds difference which is huge. – Kapil Raghuwanshi Jun 28 at 11:36
31

Can't you use ngOnInit because you just changing the member variable message?

If you want to access a reference to a child component @ViewChild(ChildComponent), you indeed need to wait for it with ngAfterViewInit.

A dirty fix is to call the updateMessage() in the next event loop with e.g. setTimeout.

ngAfterViewInit() {
  setTimeout(() => {
    this.updateMessage();
  }, 1);
}
  • 3
    Changing my code into the ngOnInit method worked for me. – Faliorn Jan 27 '16 at 11:05
  • This should be the apt answer. it works. – pihyper Sep 12 '18 at 9:16
28

ngAfterViewChecked() worked for me:

import { Component, ChangeDetectorRef } from '@angular/core'; //import ChangeDetectorRef

constructor(private cdr: ChangeDetectorRef) { }
ngAfterViewChecked(){
   //your code to update the model
   this.cdr.detectChanges();
}
22

The article Everything you need to know about the ExpressionChangedAfterItHasBeenCheckedError error explains the behavior in great details.

The problem with you setup is that ngAfterViewInit lifecycle hook is executed after change detection processed DOM updates. And you're effectively changing the property that is used in the template in this hook which means that DOM needs to be re-rendered:

  ngAfterViewInit() {
    this.message = 'all done loading :)'; // needs to be rendered the DOM
  }

and this will require another change detection cycle and Angular by design only runs one digest cycle.

You basically have two alternatives how to fix it:

  • update the property asynchronously either using setTimeout, Promise.then or asynchronous observable referenced in the template

  • perform the property update in a hook before the DOM update - ngOnInit, ngDoCheck, ngAfterContentInit, ngAfterContentChecked.

  • Read your articles: blog.angularindepth.com/…, Will read another one blog.angularindepth.com/… soon. Still could not figure out solution for this problem. can you tell me what happens if I add ngDoCheck or ngAfterContentChecked lifecycle hook and add this this.cdr.markForCheck(); (cdr for ChangeDetectorRef) inside it. Isn't it a right way to check for changes after life cycle hook and subsequent check completes. – Harsimer Apr 1 at 10:10
7

For this I have tried above answers many does not work in latest version of Angular (6 or later)

I am using Material control that required changes after first binding done.

    export class AbcClass implements OnInit, AfterContentChecked{
        constructor(private ref: ChangeDetectorRef) {}
        ngOnInit(){
            // your tasks
        }
        ngAfterViewInit() {
            this.ref.detectChanges();
        }
    }

Adding my answer so, this helps some solve specific issue.

6

You just have to update your message in the right lifecycle hook, in this case is ngAfterContentChecked instead of ngAfterViewInit, because in ngAfterViewInit a check for the variable message has been started but is not yet ended.

see: https://angular.io/docs/ts/latest/guide/lifecycle-hooks.html#!#afterview

so the code will be just:

import { Component } from 'angular2/core'

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  template: `<div>I'm {{message}} </div>`,
})
export class App {
  message: string = 'loading :(';

  ngAfterContentChecked() {
     this.message = 'all done loading :)'
  }      
}

see the working demo on Plunker.

  • I was using a combination of a @ViewChildren() length-based counter which was populated by an Observable. This was the only solution that worked for me! – msanford Mar 13 '17 at 20:02
  • 1
    Combination of ngAfterContentChecked and ChangeDetectorRef from above worked for me. On ngAfterContentChecked called - this.cdr.detectChanges(); – Kunal Dethe Mar 3 '18 at 12:09
4

You can also put your call to updateMessage() in the ngOnInt()-Method, at least it works for me

ngOnInit() {
    this.updateMessage();
}

In RC1 this does not trigger the exception

2

It throw an error because your code get updated when ngAfterViewInit() is called. Mean your initial value got changed when ngAfterViewInit take place, If you call that in ngAfterContentInit() then it will not throw an error.

ngAfterContentInit() {
    this.updateMessage();
}
2

You can also create a timer using the rxjs Observable.timer function, and then update the message in your subscription:                    

Observable.timer(1).subscribe(()=> this.updateMessage());
0

I couldnt comment on @Biranchi s post since I dont have enough reputation, but it fixed the problem for me.

One thing to note! If adding changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush on the component didn't work, and its a child component (dumb component) try adding it to the parent also.

This fixed the bug, but I wonder what are the side effects of this.

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