57

I have some code which makes use of Extension Methods, but compiles under .NET 2.0 using the compiler in VS2008. To facilitate this, I had to declare ExtensionAttribute:

/// <summary>
/// ExtensionAttribute is required to define extension methods under .NET 2.0
/// </summary>
public sealed class ExtensionAttribute : Attribute
{
}

However, I'd now like the library in which that class is contained to also be compilable under .NET 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 - without the 'ExtensionAttribute is defined in multiple places' warning.

Is there any compile time directive I can use to only include the ExtensionAttribute when the framework version being targetted is .NET 2?

60

The linked SO question with 'create N different configurations' is certainly one option, but when I had a need for this I just added conditional DefineConstants elements, so in my Debug|x86 (for instance) after the existing DefineConstants for DEBUG;TRACE, I added these 2, checking the value in TFV that was set in the first PropertyGroup of the csproj file.

<DefineConstants Condition=" '$(TargetFrameworkVersion)' == 'v4.0' ">RUNNING_ON_4</DefineConstants>
<DefineConstants Condition=" '$(TargetFrameworkVersion)' != 'v4.0' ">NOT_RUNNING_ON_4</DefineConstants>

You don't need both, obviously, but it's just there to give examples of both eq and ne behavior - #else and #elif work fine too :)

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
#if RUNNING_ON_4
        Console.WriteLine("RUNNING_ON_4 was set");
#endif
#if NOT_RUNNING_ON_4
        Console.WriteLine("NOT_RUNNING_ON_4 was set");
#endif
    }
}

I could then switch between targeting 3.5 and 4.0 and it would do the right thing.

  • 14
    Sorry, but where do I write those DefineConstants tags? – Girardi Sep 7 '11 at 14:34
  • 2
    breaks the #if DEBUG precompile directive. Maslow has the working solution. Don't mention the DEBUG;TRACE constants if you're just going to break em. – midspace Mar 2 '12 at 4:15
  • 4
    I know this is pretty old, but isn't RUNNING misleading? Shouldn't it be COMPILING_ON_4? – Sean Hall Apr 18 '13 at 17:17
  • This won't work for v4.5, you'd need to add an && to the condition to check for 4.5 (if these conditions support && operators). – qJake Aug 16 '13 at 15:50
  • If you want this property to be correctly picked up by what framework your IDE uses by default (if you don't define TargetFramework in the project) then make sure to put the DefineConstants tag after import targets. – Adam Mar 6 '14 at 11:43
34

I have a few suggestions for improving on the answers given so far:

  1. Use Version.CompareTo(). Testing for equality will not work for later framework versions, yet to be named. E.g.

    <CustomConstants Condition=" '$(TargetFrameworkVersion)' == 'v4.0' ">
    

    will not match v4.5 or v4.5.1, which typically you do want.

  2. Use an import file so that these additional properties only need to be defined once. I recommend keeping the imports file under source control, so that changes are propagated along with the project files, without extra effort.

  3. Add the import element at the end of your project file, so that it is independent of any configuration specific property groups. This also has the benefit of requiring a single additional line in your project file.

Here is the import file (VersionSpecificSymbols.Common.prop)

<!--
******************************************************************
Defines the Compile time symbols Microsoft forgot
Modelled from https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms171464.aspx
*********************************************************************
-->

<Project xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
    <PropertyGroup>
        <DefineConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('4.5.1')))) &gt;= 0">$(DefineConstants);NETFX_451</DefineConstants>
        <DefineConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('4.5'))))   &gt;= 0">$(DefineConstants);NETFX_45</DefineConstants>
        <DefineConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('4.0'))))   &gt;= 0">$(DefineConstants);NETFX_40</DefineConstants>
        <DefineConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('3.5'))))   &gt;= 0">$(DefineConstants);NETFX_35</DefineConstants>
        <DefineConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('3.0'))))   &gt;= 0">$(DefineConstants);NETFX_30</DefineConstants>
    </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

Add Import Element to Project File

Reference it from your .csproj file by adding at the end, before the tag.

…
    <Import Project="VersionSpecificSymbols.Common.prop" />
</Project>

You will need to fix up the path to point to the common/shared folder where you put this file.

To Use Compile Time Symbols

namespace VersionSpecificCodeHowTo
{
    using System;

    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
#if NETFX_451
            Console.WriteLine("NET_451 was set");
#endif

#if NETFX_45
            Console.WriteLine("NET_45 was set");
#endif

#if NETFX_40
            Console.WriteLine("NET_40 was set");
#endif

#if NETFX_35
            Console.WriteLine("NETFX_35 was set");
#endif

#if NETFX_30
            Console.WriteLine("NETFX_30 was set");
#endif

#if NETFX_20
             Console.WriteLine("NETFX_20 was set");
#else
           The Version specific symbols were not set correctly!
#endif

#if DEBUG
            Console.WriteLine("DEBUG was set");
#endif

#if MySymbol
            Console.WriteLine("MySymbol was set");
#endif
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

A Common “Real Life” Example

Implementing Join(string delimiter, IEnumerable strings) Prior to .NET 4.0

// string Join(this IEnumerable<string> strings, string delimiter)
// was not introduced until 4.0. So provide our own.
#if ! NETFX_40 && NETFX_35
public static string Join( string delimiter, IEnumerable<string> strings)
{
    return string.Join(delimiter, strings.ToArray());
}
#endif

References

Property Functions

MSBuild Property Evaluation

Can I make a preprocessor directive dependent on the .NET framework version?

Conditional compilation depending on the framework version in C#

  • 1
    This as a NuGet package would be awesome! – ferventcoder Oct 10 '15 at 23:37
  • 1
    This did not work in Visual Studio 2015 for a Visual Basic project. To fix, put the new Import before VisualBasic.Targets. IE <Import Project="MSBuild\VersionSpecificSymbols.Common.prop" /> <Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath32)\Microsoft.VisualBasic.targets"/> The VB targets file uses the property FinalDefineConstants which is composed from DefineConstants. Thus, the custom import must occur first as Properties are evaluated in the order in which they appear in the project file. – bdeem Feb 25 '16 at 19:33
  • worked like a charm except I updated the constants to match the 2017 names (NET451, NET45) etc. – hal9000 Apr 25 '18 at 17:03
29

Property groups are overwrite only so this would knock out your settings for DEBUG, TRACE, or any others. - See MSBuild Property Evaluation

Also if the DefineConstants property is set from the command line anything you do to it inside the project file is irrelevant as that setting becomes global readonly. This means your changes to that value fail silently.

Example maintaining existing defined constants:

    <CustomConstants Condition=" '$(TargetFrameworkVersion)' == 'v2.0' ">V2</CustomConstants>
    <CustomConstants Condition=" '$(TargetFrameworkVersion)' == 'v4.0' ">V4</CustomConstants>
    <DefineConstants Condition=" '$(DefineConstants)' != '' And '$(CustomConstants)' != '' ">$(DefineConstants);</DefineConstants>
    <DefineConstants>$(DefineConstants)$(CustomConstants)</DefineConstants>

This section MUST come after any other defined constants since those are unlikely to be set up in an additive manner

I only defined those 2 because that's mostly what I'm interested in on my project, ymmv.

See Also: Common MsBuild Project Properties

  • 3
    If you place a semicolon in the last line you can omit the third line: $(DefineConstants);$(CustomConstants). The extra semicolon in the event of an empty constant variable seems to cause no issues. – Kevin P. Rice Jan 2 '12 at 10:09
  • 1
    Where do these lines go? – coderforlife May 28 '12 at 22:04
  • inside a propertygroup – Maslow May 28 '12 at 22:36
  • FYI this construct is a bit too complex for the SharpDevelop IDE which gets confused by it. – Adam Mar 6 '14 at 9:42
  • 1
    You don't even need to do this conditionally, you could just define: <DefineConstants>NETFX$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Replace("v", "").Replace(".", "_"));$(DefineConstants)</DefineConstants> – BrainSlugs83 Aug 28 '14 at 1:34
6

Pre-defined symbols for target frameworks are now built into the version of MSBuild that is used by the dotnet tool and by VS 2017 onwards. See https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/frameworks#how-to-specify-target-frameworks for the full list.

#if NET47
Console.WriteLine("Running on .Net 4.7");
#elif NETCOREAPP2_0
Console.WriteLine("Running on .Net Core 2.0");
#endif
  • Nice to know MS finally has a solution to this, but unless they implemented this in the .targets files and deployed them in a patch, this will not help the OP on VS2008 or anyone still stuck on VS2015 or earlier. – Andrew Dennison Apr 14 '18 at 3:48
  • also, they don't work if your project was migrated from earlier versions of Visual Studio. Earlier answers describe this and how to adjust for this. – hal9000 Apr 25 '18 at 16:29
  • It's not working for me (using at least VS 2017 on at least v15.8.1 on at least C# WPF app targeting at least 3.5 or 4). Perhaps due to this issue: " github.com/dotnet/docs/issues/7096 "? NOTE: My "*.CsProj" File contains "<Project ToolsVersion="15.0"" (aka VS 2017) and "<TargetFrameworkVersion>v3.5</TargetFrameworkVersion>" but the TargetFrameworkProfile Element (where I expected the NET35 Preprocessor Symbol to be defined) was left blank (as "<TargetFrameworkProfile />"). – Tom Feb 19 at 20:21
5

I would like to contribute with an updated answer which solves some issues.

If you set DefineConstants instead of CustomConstants you'll end up, in the Conditional Compilation Symbols Debug command line, after some framework version switch, with duplicated conditional constants (i.e.: NETFX_451;NETFX_45;NETFX_40;NETFX_35;NETFX_30;NETFX_20;NETFX_35;NETFX_30;NETFX_20;). This is the VersionSpecificSymbols.Common.prop which solves any issue.

<!--
*********************************************************************
Defines the Compile time symbols Microsoft forgot
Modelled from https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms171464.aspx
*********************************************************************
Author: Lorenzo Ruggeri (lrnz.ruggeri@gmail.com)
-->

<Project xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <Choose>
    <When Condition=" $(TargetFrameworkVersion) == 'v2.0' ">
      <PropertyGroup>
        <CustomConstants >$(CustomConstants);NETFX_20</CustomConstants>
      </PropertyGroup>
    </When>
    <When Condition=" $(TargetFrameworkVersion) == 'v3.0' ">
      <PropertyGroup>
        <CustomConstants >$(CustomConstants);NETFX_30</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants >$(CustomConstants);NETFX_20</CustomConstants>
      </PropertyGroup>
    </When>
    <When Condition=" $(TargetFrameworkVersion) == 'v3.5' ">
      <PropertyGroup>
        <CustomConstants >$(CustomConstants);NETFX_35</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants >$(CustomConstants);NETFX_30</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants >$(CustomConstants);NETFX_20</CustomConstants>
      </PropertyGroup>
    </When>
    <Otherwise>
      <PropertyGroup>
        <CustomConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('4.5.1')))) &gt;= 0">$(CustomConstants);NETFX_451</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('4.5')))) &gt;= 0">$(CustomConstants);NETFX_45</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('4.0')))) &gt;= 0">$(CustomConstants);NETFX_40</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('3.5')))) &gt;= 0">$(CustomConstants);NETFX_35</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('3.0')))) &gt;= 0">$(CustomConstants);NETFX_30</CustomConstants>
        <CustomConstants Condition="$([System.Version]::Parse('$(TargetFrameworkVersion.Substring(1))').CompareTo($([System.Version]::Parse('2.0')))) &gt;= 0">$(CustomConstants);NETFX_20</CustomConstants>
      </PropertyGroup>
    </Otherwise>
  </Choose>
  <PropertyGroup>
    <DefineConstants>$(DefineConstants);$(CustomConstants)</DefineConstants>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>
  • 1
    I was unable to see the problem you describe with duplicated symbols. Please give more detail. Perhaps this happens when you edit Custom Conditional symbols through the UI? I have seen that, but don't understand how CustomConstants avoids the problem. – Andrew Dennison Feb 1 '18 at 18:19
  • 1
    Finally, what is the purpose of Choose ... When. Aren't all of these cases already handled in the Otherwise element? – Andrew Dennison Feb 1 '18 at 18:20
  • Yes, please answer @Andrew Dennison's 2 Qs above. I've the same Qs. – Tom Feb 19 at 20:24
1

Use reflection to determine if the class exists. If it does, then dynamically create and use it, otherwise use the .Net2 workaround class which can be defined, but not used for all other .net versions.

Here is code I used for an AggregateException which is .Net 4 and greater only:

var aggregatException = Type.GetType("System.AggregateException");

if (aggregatException != null) // .Net 4 or greater
{
    throw ((Exception)Activator.CreateInstance(aggregatException, ps.Streams.Error.Select(err => err.Exception)));
}

// Else all other non .Net 4 or less versions
throw ps.Streams.Error.FirstOrDefault()?.Exception 
      ?? new Exception("Powershell Exception Encountered."); // Sanity check operation, should not hit.

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