4

I was profiling the performance of my PHP website and was surprised to find the bottle neck was the header function.

I'm running on PHP 5.3 and Apache 2.4.

I benchmarked two simple files with ab and found that the first - executing phpinfo() - was vastly faster than the second - calling header.

First file (capable of running at over 1000 requests per second):

<?php phpinfo(); ?>

Second file (only capable of 12 requests per second!):

<?php header('HTTP/1.1 200 OK'); ?>

Complete ab output from the first test:

C:\work\apache24\bin>ab -n 1000 -c 200 http://q.localhost/test.php
This is ApacheBench, Version 2.3 <$Revision: 1663405 $>
Copyright 1996 Adam Twiss, Zeus Technology Ltd, http://www.zeustech.net/
Licensed to The Apache Software Foundation, http://www.apache.org/

Benchmarking q.localhost (be patient)
Completed 100 requests
Completed 200 requests
Completed 300 requests
Completed 400 requests
Completed 500 requests
Completed 600 requests
Completed 700 requests
Completed 800 requests
Completed 900 requests
Completed 1000 requests
Finished 1000 requests


Server Software:        Apache/2.4.16
Server Hostname:        q.localhost
Server Port:            80

Document Path:          /test.php
Document Length:        69600 bytes

Server Software:        Apache/2.4.16
Server Hostname:        q.localhost
Server Port:            80

Document Path:          /test.php
Document Length:        69600 bytes

Concurrency Level:      200
Time taken for tests:   0.984 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      69768000 bytes
HTML transferred:       69600000 bytes
Requests per second:    1015.82 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       196.885 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       0.984 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          69210.84 [Kbytes/sec] received

Complete ab output from the second test:

C:\work\apache24\bin>ab -n 1000 -c 200 http://q.localhost/test.php
This is ApacheBench, Version 2.3 <$Revision: 1663405 $>
Copyright 1996 Adam Twiss, Zeus Technology Ltd, http://www.zeustech.net/
Licensed to The Apache Software Foundation, http://www.apache.org/

Benchmarking q.localhost (be patient)
Completed 100 requests
Completed 200 requests
Completed 300 requests
Completed 400 requests
Completed 500 requests
Completed 600 requests
Completed 700 requests
Completed 800 requests
Completed 900 requests
Completed 1000 requests
Finished 1000 requests

Server Software:        Apache/2.4.16
Server Hostname:        q.localhost
Server Port:            80
Document Path:          /test.php
Document Length:        0 bytes
Concurrency Level:      200
Time taken for tests:   80.099 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      168000 bytes
HTML transferred:       0 bytes
Requests per second:    12.48 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       16019.840 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       80.099 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          2.05 [Kbytes/sec] received

A simple call to the header function brings the performance down to 12 requests per second. This shocked me.

Why is the header() function so slow, and is there anything I can change in my config to fix it?

7
  • Very interesting... I can reproduce this on my (Ubuntu) machine. It's not to do with the lack of body output, either; <?php echo 'foo'; ?> is fast, but <?php header('HTTP/1.1 200 OK'); echo 'foo'; ?> is still slow. – Mark Amery Dec 19 '15 at 10:06
  • what happens if you append to your code the following ? flush(); ob_flush(); – Paolo Dec 19 '15 at 10:28
  • @Paolo doesn't help; doesn't change the results at all. (By the way, logically those flushes ought to be the other way round, i.e. ob_flush(); flush(), since the ob_ buffer comes before the write buffer. That doesn't help either, though.) – Mark Amery Dec 19 '15 at 10:32
  • One thing to try: set the response code via a different header (where applicable): header ('X-Whatever: foobarbaz', true, 200); wonder if the problem still persists. – Piskvor left the building Dec 19 '15 at 11:12
  • @Piskvor the fix you've proposed also works. From my testing, the bug seems to be extremely limited in scope; it seems to only apply when using the 'HTTP/' special case logic of header(), with HTTP in upper-case and HTTP 1.1 (not 1.0) specified, and only for 200 or 404 codes. Very, very odd. – Mark Amery Dec 19 '15 at 11:21
2

Update: in 2017, I finally got around to filing a bug report.


I can reproduce this behaviour on my own machine (on Apache 2.4.12, using either PHP 5.6 or PHP 7.0 - the behaviour is the same for both) and share your "shock" at seeing a single call to header() reduce a script's performance by two orders of magnitude. I still don't know what's going on; it definitely shouldn't be happening.

However, I can at least suggest how to fix it:

  • On PHP 5.4 and above, use http_response_code to set status codes instead of header.
  • If you're in the horrible position of being stuck on PHP 5.3, try using a lower-case http in the argument passed to header instead of an upper-case HTTP. e.g.

    <?php header('http/1.1 200 OK'); ?>
    

    On my machine, this still sets the status code (as the docs note, the special case logic in header for setting the status code is case-insensitive) but makes the performance problem disappear.

In case you're wondering, yes, this behaviour is gibberingly insane, even compared to the low sanity baseline I expect from PHP. I'm going to explore a little more and see if I can figure out what's going on, but hopefully this will at least let you and anyone else experiencing this issue fix their immediate performance problems.

1
  • 2
    Apache/2.4.17 (Fedora) PHP/5.6.16 - same problem. That's... just... words fail me. That's insane, but I'd be curious to know the causes. It means that we must change some popular libraries accordingly? – Federkun Dec 19 '15 at 11:19
1

I've just tried with

ab -n 1000 -c 200 -H "Connection:close" http://localhost/test.php

where test.php contains

<?php header('HTTP/1.1 200 OK'); ?>

and the output is:

This is ApacheBench, Version 2.3 <$Revision: 1706008 $>
Copyright 1996 Adam Twiss, Zeus Technology Ltd, http://www.zeustech.net/
Licensed to The Apache Software Foundation, http://www.apache.org/

Benchmarking localhost (be patient)
Completed 100 requests
Completed 200 requests
Completed 300 requests
Completed 400 requests
Completed 500 requests
Completed 600 requests
Completed 700 requests
Completed 800 requests
Completed 900 requests
Completed 1000 requests
Finished 1000 requests


Server Software:        Apache/2.4.17
Server Hostname:        localhost
Server Port:            80

Document Path:          /test.php
Document Length:        3 bytes

Concurrency Level:      200
Time taken for tests:   0.364 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      206000 bytes
HTML transferred:       3000 bytes
Requests per second:    2744.74 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       72.867 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       0.364 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          552.16 [Kbytes/sec] received

Connection Times (ms)
              min  mean[+/-sd] median   max
Connect:        0    4   6.7      0      19
Processing:     1   66  72.9     34     330
Waiting:        0   33  51.3     16     306
Total:          1   69  74.7     37     348

Percentage of the requests served within a certain time (ms)
  50%     37
  66%     87
  75%    110
  80%    129
  90%    153
  95%    219
  98%    334
  99%    347
 100%    348 (longest request)

So, seems that sending Connection: close header resolves the issue. You should use ab with the -k flag on. That does the keep-alive funcionality that browsers does by default. With:

ab -n 1000 -c 20 -k http://localhost/test.php

the loading times are normal.

But don't ask me why the output of ab -n 1000 -c 200 http://q.localhost/test.php where test.php contains <?php header('HTTP/1.1 200 OK'); ?> is different from <?php header('http/1.1 200 OK'); ?>, because really I have no idea.

1
  • yes , with "keep-alive" the times are normal, so it means, if a site with this header, it should be fast in an ordinary browser, but it could be really slow for a "un-normal" connection e.g. a crawler, or a sepecial browser without "keep-alive" on, right ? – henry Dec 22 '15 at 7:20

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