15

I have a while-loop that should repeat the program until a certain condition is met. Inside this loop I call an async function, which prints out a message for me. Here is the (cut-short) code:

private void InitializeMessageSystem ( ) 
{
    do
    {
        // Do stuff
        await printMessage ("Hello World!");
        Console.ReadKey();
    } while (condition != true)
}

And here the function PrintMessage():

private static async Task PrintMessage (string message, int spd = 1)
{
    int delay = 50 / spd;

    string[] words = message.Split(' ');

    int index = 1;

    for (int word = 0; word < words.Length; word++)
    {
        char[] current = words[word].ToCharArray();
        if (index + current.Length > Console.WindowWidth)
        {
            Console.WriteLine();
            index = 1;
        }
        for (int c = 0; c < current.Length; c++)
        {
            Console.Write(current[c]);
            await Task.Delay(delay);
        }
        Console.Write(" ");
    }
}

Edit: Here's the call from the main function:

static void Main (string[] args) 
{
    InitializeMessageSystem();
    Console.ReadKey();
}

Question

Why does my program exit, when I press a key while the function is not yet completed? I thought the program would wait for the Console.ReadKey() until the function PrintMessage() is completed?

4
  • 2
    Where is the entry point of your program? Since Main cannot be async, the code you have shown is in another method. In all likelihood, the main thread entered the method, hit an await and resumed on another thread. That thread is the one that is blocked by ReadKey. The main thread continued and exited causing the program to exit. Dec 19, 2015 at 21:37
  • @mike z The entry point is only one line of code, the calling of the function that the loop is located in
    – Ian H.
    Dec 19, 2015 at 21:50
  • 2
    @IanH. And yet the specifics of that are highly relevant, even with it being just one line of code.
    – Servy
    Dec 19, 2015 at 22:33
  • @Ian H.: As hinted above, the few missing lines (the main method + the "loop" method's signature) are the key to explaining your "mystery". Please post them. When asking a question, don't just show the code where you think the problem is. Often, that assumption is wrong, which is why the question gets asked in the first place. Instead, always provide a minimal, but complete program that allows us to reproduce your problem. So simple, yet such an effective way of getting a proper answer to any question.
    – sstan
    Dec 20, 2015 at 1:01

3 Answers 3

31

Your problem is that await returns the control flow of the program to the caller of the function. Normally execution is continued at that point when the asynchronous task you await finishes.

So control is returned to your main function as you wait for printMessage and main now waits for a key input. As you hit the key main returns to the OS and your process (including all asynchronous tasks) terminates.

Change your InitializeMessageSystem to

private async Task InitializeMessageSystem ( )  

and change the code in main to

InitializeMessageSystem().Wait();

to wait until InitializeMessageSystem finishes completely before waiting for the key.

4
  • The problem is now that if I press a key during the function it instantly continues without waiting after the function is completed.
    – Ian H.
    Dec 20, 2015 at 17:06
  • Of course, because the key is buffered until you read it. I have no instant answer. Try googling for something like flush, but I remember flushing an input stream is a little difficult.
    – René Vogt
    Dec 20, 2015 at 17:58
  • I had to call this before the await, else the console will just end
    – TPG
    Mar 19, 2020 at 8:53
  • await does not return control of the program to the caller until after it finishes. Main was never waiting for a keypress while awaiting printMessage. The actual problem is that code awaiting a task does not prevent the program from exiting.
    – Ted Bigham
    May 10, 2021 at 0:31
2

The below code executes without any errors or warnings. But when you execute the code the program exits silently. What you might be expecting is the program waits for the task to complete, asks the user to press any key and exit. What actually happens is after the await statement is executed the control goes back to the invoking step. In our case after the step await task; is executed, before the task completes the control goes back to the invoking step SomeTask(); and the program exits.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SomeTask();
    }

    public static async void SomeTask()
    {
        Task task = Task.Run(() =>
        {
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(20000);
            Console.WriteLine("Task Completed!");
        });
        await task;
        Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

To fix this, add await to the SomeTask(); call so that the program waits for async SomeTask() to complete. You should also change the return type of SomeTask() from void to Task.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        await SomeTask();
    }

    public static async Task SomeTask()
    {
        Task task = Task.Run(() =>
        {
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(20000);
            Console.WriteLine("Task Completed!");
        });
        await task;
        Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
0

The difference between calling a synchronous function and an async function is that when calling the synchronous function you know that when you reach the statement after the call the function is executed completely. When calling an async function, the function is scheduled as a task at the thread pool to be performed when any of the threads in the pool has time for it.

This gives you time to do other things while one of the threads is performing the task. As soon as you need the result you await for the task to be finished.

This works only if your function is also async. If you don't make your function async your can't use async-await. Making your function async and the clients of your function also async is the only way to truly use async-await. Remember: all async functions should return Task instead of void and Task<TResult> instead of TResult. The only exception is the event handler

private async void Button1_Clicked(object sender, ...)
{
    var myTask = SlowMultiplierAsync(4, 3);
    // while myTask is running you can do other things
    // after a while you need the result:
    int taskResult = await myTask;
    Process(taskResult);
}

private async Task<int> SlowMultiplierAsync(int x, int y)
{
     // let's take a nap before multiplying
     // do this by awaiting another async function:
     await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
     return x * y;
}

If you don't want (or can) make your function async, you can simulate similar behaviour by starting a task using task.Run:

private void InitializeMessageSystem ( ) {
do
{
    // Do stuff
    var myTask = task.Run( () => printMessage ("Hello World!"));
    myTask.Wait();
    Console.ReadKey();
} while (condition != true)

Although this will make sure that your function won't end before the task is finished, your function will be a synchronous one for your clients. For instance it won't make your UI responsive.

Eric lippert here on stackoverflow once explained me the difference between asynchronous concurrent. Link to his answer

Suppose you have to make breakfast. Toast some bread and cook some eggs.

  • Synchronous: start toasting bread. Wait until toasting finished. Start cooking eggs, wait until eggs are cooked.
  • Asynchronous but not concurrent: start toasting bread, and while the bread is toasting start cooking eggs. While the eggs are cooking yo can do other things, like making tea. After a while you wait until the eggs are cooked and wait until the bread is toasted. This is typically async-await.
  • Asynchronous and concurrent: hire a cook to toast the bread, hire a cook to cook the eggs and wait until both cooks are finished. Here the toasting and cooking is done by different threads. It is the most expensive method
1
  • 2
    "When calling an async function, the function is scheduled as a task at the thread pool to be performed when any of the threads in the pool has time for it." I see you believe the myth that there is a thread. Though often there is a thread, and often there should be a thread (because the work is processor-bound) there is no requirement that there be a thread. Lots of asynchronous work can be done with no additional thread, if, say, it's I/O bound. You might want to read Stephen Cleary's article on the subject. blog.stephencleary.com/2013/11/there-is-no-thread.html Dec 21, 2015 at 13:47

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