0

I used: print Dumper $decoded, where $decoded is the HASH variable and I got this as the output.

    $VAR1 = {
              'Case_345' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   },
              'Case_512' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   },
              'Case_534' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   },
              'Case_552' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   },
              'Case_578' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   },
              'Case_466' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   },
              'Case_754' => {
                                     'Notes' => 'test2',
                                     'Submit_Date' => '2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC',
                                     'Last_Resolved_Date' => ''
                                   }
            };

This is what I tried using to output some values to test iterating through the HASH.

    foreach my $key ( keys %decoded )
    {
         print "key: $key, value: $decoded{$key}\n";
    }

It does not iterate at all through the $decoded variable. I am new to perl, could someone please help me out. If it helps I got this by converting a string with JSON::XS::decode_json($json_str). Thanks.

10

The first thing is that $decoded is a scalar variable containing a hash reference, and is nothing to do with the hash variable %decoded. To access the hash that $decoded refers to you must dereference it, with %$decoded

You must always use strict and use warnings 'all' at the top of every Perl program you write, especially before asking others for help with it. It is a simple measure that, in this instance, would have caught the fact that you had used %decoded without declaring it

In addition, the values of your hash are more hash references, and printing them out will produce something less than useful like this

key: Case_466, value: HASH(0xbf4840)
key: Case_534, value: HASH(0xc6dc00)
key: Case_552, value: HASH(0x280fce0)
key: Case_512, value: HASH(0xbf4930)
key: Case_345, value: HASH(0xd4c2f0)
key: Case_754, value: HASH(0x280fdd0)
key: Case_578, value: HASH(0x280fd58)

Presumably you want the values of all the fields in each hash? To access the value of a hash element given a key and a reference to the hash you should write $hashref->{key}, so this code will dump the entire hash for you

for my $key ( keys %$decoded ) {
  my $data = $decoded->{$key};
  print "key: $key, values:\n";
  for my $field ( qw/ Submit_Date Last_Resolved_Date Notes / ) {
    printf "    %-18s => %s\n", $field, $data->{$field};
  }
}

output

key: Case_578, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
key: Case_754, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
key: Case_534, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
key: Case_345, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
key: Case_512, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
key: Case_552, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
key: Case_466, values:
    Submit_Date        => 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
    Last_Resolved_Date => 
    Notes              => test2
0

First, as Borodin said, $decoded is not a hash variable. It's a scalar variable; it just happens to contain a reference to an anonymous hash. In Perl, each sigil has its own namespace, so there is no relationship between the scalar variable $decoded and the hash variable %decoded (or the array variable @decoded, for that matter). Your use of the undefined hash var would have been flagged as an error if you were running under use strict;; as a general rule, you should always start Perl scripts with use strict;. It's a good idea to turn on warnings with use warnings; as well.

It's widely considered a design error that use strict; is not turned on by default in Perl 5. It was made the default in version 5.12, but for backward compatibility, it's still only turned on for scripts that declare that they were written for a Perl that new. So as an alternative to use strict;, you can just put use v5.12; (or a newer version number), which will also enable other (non-experimental) new features like say to print with a newline.

Second, the standard way to iterate over both the keys and values of a hash in Perl is to use each, which you can do for both the outer hash and each of the individual hashes:

while (my ($case, $data) = each %$decoded) {
  print "$case:\n";
  while (my ($field, $value) = each %$data) {
    print "\t$field: $value\n";
  }
}

But in practice, each is often avoided because it doesn't iterate over the keys in any predictable order (although it's the same order that keys and values return their results in). You may prefer to sort the keys and look up the values manually instead:

foreach my $case (sort keys %$decoded) {
  my $data = $decoded->{$case};     
  print "$case:\n";
  foreach my $field (sort keys %$data) {
    $value = $data->{$field};
    print "\t$field: $value\n";
  }
}

Also, the output might be more human-friendly with spaces instead of underscores:

foreach my $case (sort keys %$decoded) {
  my $data = $decoded->{$case};␣␣␣␣␣
  (my $case_label = $case) =~ s/_/ /g;
  print "$case_label:\n";
  foreach my $field (sort keys %$data) {
    (my $field_label = $field) =~ s/_/ /g;
    $value = $data->{$field};
    print "\t$field_label: $value\n";
  }
}

Which produces this:

Case 345:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
Case 466:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
Case 512:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
Case 534:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
Case 552:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
Case 578:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
Case 754:
    Last Resolved Date: 
    Notes: test2
    Submit Date: 2015-11-21 00:53:22 UTC
  • 2
    Re "the usual way to iterate over both the keys and values of a hash in Perl is to use each" Hardly. Too error-prone. // No mention of strictures??? – ikegami Dec 20 '15 at 4:32
  • Added strictures, but still not sure how each is "error-prone"? – Mark Reed Dec 20 '15 at 4:39
  • 2
    There's only one each/keys/values iterator per hash. Exiting the loop prematurely without causes problems [common]. Calling a sub that also iterates over the same hash causes problems [rare]. each is rarely used as a result. It's far from standard. – ikegami Dec 20 '15 at 4:42

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