830

I have a generics class, Foo<T>. In a method of Foo, I want to get the class instance of type T, but I just can't call T.class.

What is the preferred way to get around it using T.class?

5

23 Answers 23

658

The short answer is, that there is no way to find out the runtime type of generic type parameters in Java. I suggest reading the chapter about type erasure in the Java Tutorial for more details.

A popular solution to this is to pass the Class of the type parameter into the constructor of the generic type, e.g.

class Foo<T> {
    final Class<T> typeParameterClass;

    public Foo(Class<T> typeParameterClass) {
        this.typeParameterClass = typeParameterClass;
    }

    public void bar() {
        // you can access the typeParameterClass here and do whatever you like
    }
}
6
  • 84
    This answer does provide a valid solution but it is inaccurate to say there is no way to find the generic type at runtime. It turns out type erasure is far more complex than a blanket erasure. My answer shows you how to get the classes generic type. Nov 22, 2012 at 10:58
  • 6
    @BenThurley Neat trick, but as far as I can see it only works if there is a generic supertype for it to use. In my example, you can't retrieve the type of T in Foo<T>. Jun 10, 2013 at 9:54
  • @webjockey No, you shouldn't. Assigning the typeParameterClass without a default assignment in the constructor is perfectly fine. There's no need to set it a second time.
    – Adowrath
    Aug 25, 2017 at 7:03
  • This is the first solution that comes to mind, but at times it is not you who will be creating/initiating objects. So you will not be able to use constructor. For e.g. while retrieving JPA entities from database. Aug 30, 2019 at 12:03
  • @ZsoltTörök I think I found the solution to this problem. Please check my answer: stackoverflow.com/a/64504193/9432967
    – Omid.N
    Oct 23, 2020 at 16:51
288

I was looking for a way to do this myself without adding an extra dependency to the classpath. After some investigation I found that it is possible as long as you have a generic supertype. This was OK for me as I was working with a DAO layer with a generic layer supertype. If this fits your scenario then it's the neatest approach IMHO.

Most generics use cases I've come across have some kind of generic supertype e.g. List<T> for ArrayList<T> or GenericDAO<T> for DAO<T>, etc.

Pure Java solution

The article Accessing generic types at runtime in Java explains how you can do it using pure Java.

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public GenericJpaDao() {
  this.entityBeanType = ((Class) ((ParameterizedType) getClass()
      .getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0]);
}

Spring solution

My project was using Spring which is even better as Spring has a handy utility method for finding the type. This is the best approach for me as it looks neatest. I guess if you weren't using Spring you could write your own utility method.

import org.springframework.core.GenericTypeResolver;

public abstract class AbstractHibernateDao<T extends DomainObject> implements DataAccessObject<T>
{

    @Autowired
    private SessionFactory sessionFactory;

    private final Class<T> genericType;

    private final String RECORD_COUNT_HQL;
    private final String FIND_ALL_HQL;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public AbstractHibernateDao()
    {
        this.genericType = (Class<T>) GenericTypeResolver.resolveTypeArgument(getClass(), AbstractHibernateDao.class);
        this.RECORD_COUNT_HQL = "select count(*) from " + this.genericType.getName();
        this.FIND_ALL_HQL = "from " + this.genericType.getName() + " t ";
    }

Full code example

Some people are struggling in the comments to get this working so I wrote a small application to show both approaches in action. https://github.com/benthurley82/generic-type-resolver-test

15
  • 1
    please clarify meaning of resolveTypeArgument arguments Dec 14, 2015 at 16:21
  • 1
    getClass() is a method of java.lang.Object which will return the class of the specific object at runtime, this is the object you want to resolve the type for. AbstractHibernateDao.class is just the name of the base class or superclass of the generic type class hierarchy. The import statement is included so you should be able to easily find the docs and check yourself. This is the page docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/… Dec 14, 2015 at 16:30
  • 1
    The link in "Pure Java solution" is broken, it is now blog.xebia.com/acessing-generic-types-at-runtime-in-java
    – Nick Breen
    Sep 26, 2017 at 21:33
  • 1
    @AlikElzin-kilaka it gets initialised in the constructor using the Spring class GenericTypeResolver. Sep 5, 2018 at 11:24
  • 7
    java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.Class cannot be cast to java.lang.reflect.ParameterizedType
    – Khan
    May 6, 2020 at 15:46
113

There is a small loophole however: if you define your Foo class as abstract. That would mean you have to instantiate you class as:

Foo<MyType> myFoo = new Foo<MyType>(){};

(Note the double braces at the end.)

Now you can retrieve the type of T at runtime:

Type mySuperclass = myFoo.getClass().getGenericSuperclass();
Type tType = ((ParameterizedType)mySuperclass).getActualTypeArguments()[0];

Note however that mySuperclass has to be the superclass of the class definition actually defining the final type for T.

It is also not very elegant, but you have to decide whether you prefer new Foo<MyType>(){} or new Foo<MyType>(MyType.class); in your code.


For example:

import java.lang.reflect.ParameterizedType;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;

import java.util.ArrayDeque;
import java.util.Deque;
import java.util.NoSuchElementException;

/**
 * Captures and silently ignores stack exceptions upon popping.
 */
public abstract class SilentStack<E> extends ArrayDeque<E> {
  public E pop() {
    try {
      return super.pop();
    }
    catch( NoSuchElementException nsee ) {
      return create();
    }
  }

  public E create() {
    try {
      Type sooper = getClass().getGenericSuperclass();
      Type t = ((ParameterizedType)sooper).getActualTypeArguments()[ 0 ];

      return (E)(Class.forName( t.toString() ).newInstance());
    }
    catch( Exception e ) {
      return null;
    }
  }
}

Then:

public class Main {
    // Note the braces...
    private Deque<String> stack = new SilentStack<String>(){};

    public static void main( String args[] ) {
      // Returns a new instance of String.
      String s = stack.pop();
      System.out.printf( "s = '%s'\n", s );
    }
}
3
  • 5
    This is easily the best answer on here! Also, for what it's worth, this is the strategy that Google Guice uses for binding classes with TypeLiteral
    – ATG
    Jun 5, 2014 at 23:44
  • 14
    Note that every time this method of object construction is used, a new anonymous class is created. In other words, two objects a and b created this way will both extend the same class but not have identical instance classes. a.getClass() != b.getClass() Mar 20, 2015 at 17:04
  • 3
    There is one scenario in which this doesn't work. If Foo should implement an interface, such as Serializable, than the anonymous class would not be Serializable unless the class instantiating is. I tried to workaround it by creating a serializable factory class that creates the anonymous class derived from Foo, but then, for some reason, getActualTypeArguments returns the generic type instead of the actual class. For example: (new FooFactory<MyType>()).createFoo()
    – Lior Chaga
    May 7, 2015 at 9:25
43

A standard approach/workaround/solution is to add a class object to the constructor(s), like:

 public class Foo<T> {

    private Class<T> type;
    public Foo(Class<T> type) {
      this.type = type;
    }

    public Class<T> getType() {
      return type;
    }

    public T newInstance() {
      return type.newInstance();
    }
 }
3
  • 2
    But it seemed cannot @autowired in actual use, any way to work around? Feb 2, 2018 at 7:16
  • @AlfredHuang The work around would be to create a bean for the class that does this and not rely on autowiring.
    – Calebj
    May 24, 2020 at 0:18
  • @Calebj Okay, How would I be doing that?
    – Leena
    Mar 4 at 20:01
22

Imagine you have an abstract superclass that is generic:

public abstract class Foo<? extends T> {}

And then you have a second class that extends Foo with a generic Bar that extends T:

public class Second extends Foo<Bar> {}

You can get the class Bar.class in the Foo class by selecting the Type (from bert bruynooghe answer) and infering it using Class instance:

Type mySuperclass = myFoo.getClass().getGenericSuperclass();
Type tType = ((ParameterizedType)mySuperclass).getActualTypeArguments()[0];
//Parse it as String
String className = tType.toString().split(" ")[1];
Class clazz = Class.forName(className);

You have to note this operation is not ideal, so it is a good idea to cache the computed value to avoid multiple calculations on this. One of the typical uses is in generic DAO implementation.

The final implementation:

public abstract class Foo<T> {

    private Class<T> inferedClass;

    public Class<T> getGenericClass(){
        if(inferedClass == null){
            Type mySuperclass = getClass().getGenericSuperclass();
            Type tType = ((ParameterizedType)mySuperclass).getActualTypeArguments()[0];
            String className = tType.toString().split(" ")[1];
            inferedClass = Class.forName(className);
        }
        return inferedClass;
    }
}

The value returned is Bar.class when invoked from Foo class in other function or from Bar class.

1
  • 1
    toString().split(" ")[1] that was the problem, avoid the "class " May 10, 2016 at 19:09
22

Here is a working solution:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
private Class<T> getGenericTypeClass() {
    try {
        String className = ((ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0].getTypeName();
        Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);
        return (Class<T>) clazz;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Class is not parametrized with generic type!!! Please use extends <> ");
    }
} 

NOTES: Can be used only as superclass

  1. Has to be extended with typed class (Child extends Generic<Integer>)

OR

  1. Has to be created as anonymous implementation (new Generic<Integer>() {};)
1
  • 3
    getTypeName calls toString, so can be replaced by .getActualTypeArguments()[0].toString(); Jan 20, 2016 at 14:50
13

I had this problem in an abstract generic class. In this particular case, the solution is simpler:

abstract class Foo<T> {
    abstract Class<T> getTClass();
    //...
}

and later on the derived class:

class Bar extends Foo<Whatever> {
    @Override
    Class<T> getTClass() {
        return Whatever.class;
    }
}
1
  • Yes it is, but i would like to leave very minimum that needs to be done while extending this class. Check droidpl's answer Aug 30, 2019 at 11:33
13

Contrary to most answers, it is possible (WITHOUT external libraries!)

The following is my (ugly, yet effective) solution for this problem:

import java.lang.reflect.TypeVariable;


public static <T> Class<T> getGenericClass() {
    __<T> instance = new __<T>();
    TypeVariable<?>[] parameters = instance.getClass().getTypeParameters(); 

    return (Class<T>)parameters[0].getClass();
}

// Generic helper class which (only) provides type information. This avoids
// the usage of a local variable of type T, which would have to be initialized.
private final class __<T> {
    private __() { }
}
3
  • 2
    I know this is a few years old, but this is returning me a TypeVariableImpl<T> rather than the class type of T itself Apr 8 at 13:57
  • Be that as it may, TypeVariableImpl<T> seems to be assignable to Class<T>, doesn't it? At least, I do not get any compiler errors.... I have to admit, that I'm not a java guy though ... so I might be missing some obvious flaw/drawback/consequence. Apr 11 at 20:13
  • 3
    I'm trying to use it in the creation of an EnumSet, and it doesn't seem to like it Apr 12 at 6:48
12

You can't do it because of type erasure. See also Stack Overflow question Java generics - type erasure - when and what happens.

10

A better route than the Class the others suggested is to pass in an object that can do what you would have done with the Class, e.g., create a new instance.

interface Factory<T> {
  T apply();
}

<T> void List<T> make10(Factory<T> factory) {
  List<T> result = new ArrayList<T>();
  for (int a = 0; a < 10; a++)
    result.add(factory.apply());
  return result;
}

class FooFactory<T> implements Factory<Foo<T>> {
  public Foo<T> apply() {
    return new Foo<T>();
  }
}

List<Foo<Integer>> foos = make10(new FooFactory<Integer>());
2
  • @ Ricky Clarkson: I don't see how this factory should return parametrized foos. Could you please explain how you get Foo<T> out of this? It seems to me this gives only unparametrized Foo. Isn't the T in make10 simply Foo here?
    – ib84
    Mar 13, 2013 at 9:03
  • @ib84 I've fixed the code; I seem to have missed that Foo was parameterised when I wrote the answer originally. Mar 14, 2013 at 13:04
6

I assume that, since you have a generic class, you would have a variable like that:

private T t;

(this variable needs to take a value at the constructor)

In that case you can simply create the following method:

Class<T> getClassOfInstance()
{
    return (Class<T>) t.getClass();
}

Hope it helps!

1
  • 1
    this works only if t is not null
    – Kovo
    May 22 at 12:34
6

It's possible:

class Foo<T> {
  Class<T> clazz = (Class<T>) DAOUtil.getTypeArguments(Foo.class, this.getClass()).get(0);
}

You need two functions from hibernate-generic-dao/blob/master/dao/src/main/java/com/googlecode/genericdao/dao/DAOUtil.java.

For more explanations, see Reflecting generics.

1
  • This solution appears to require a generic super class like the other solutions here.
    – Chris Wolf
    Jan 30, 2021 at 0:20
3

I found a generic and simple way to do that. In my class I created a method that returns the generic type according to it's position in the class definition. Let's assume a class definition like this:

public class MyClass<A, B, C> {

}

Now let's create some attributes to persist the types:

public class MyClass<A, B, C> {

    private Class<A> aType;

    private Class<B> bType;

    private Class<C> cType;

// Getters and setters (not necessary if you are going to use them internally)

    } 

Then you can create a generic method that returns the type based on the index of the generic definition:

   /**
     * Returns a {@link Type} object to identify generic types
     * @return type
     */
    private Type getGenericClassType(int index) {
        // To make it use generics without supplying the class type
        Type type = getClass().getGenericSuperclass();

        while (!(type instanceof ParameterizedType)) {
            if (type instanceof ParameterizedType) {
                type = ((Class<?>) ((ParameterizedType) type).getRawType()).getGenericSuperclass();
            } else {
                type = ((Class<?>) type).getGenericSuperclass();
            }
        }

        return ((ParameterizedType) type).getActualTypeArguments()[index];
    }

Finally, in the constructor just call the method and send the index for each type. The complete code should look like:

public class MyClass<A, B, C> {

    private Class<A> aType;

    private Class<B> bType;

    private Class<C> cType;


    public MyClass() {
      this.aType = (Class<A>) getGenericClassType(0);
      this.bType = (Class<B>) getGenericClassType(1);
      this.cType = (Class<C>) getGenericClassType(2);
    }

   /**
     * Returns a {@link Type} object to identify generic types
     * @return type
     */
    private Type getGenericClassType(int index) {

        Type type = getClass().getGenericSuperclass();

        while (!(type instanceof ParameterizedType)) {
            if (type instanceof ParameterizedType) {
                type = ((Class<?>) ((ParameterizedType) type).getRawType()).getGenericSuperclass();
            } else {
                type = ((Class<?>) type).getGenericSuperclass();
            }
        }

        return ((ParameterizedType) type).getActualTypeArguments()[index];
    }
}
2

As explained in other answers, to use this ParameterizedType approach, you need to extend the class, but that seems like extra work to make a whole new class that extends it...

So, making the class abstract it forces you to extend it, thus satisfying the subclassing requirement. (using lombok's @Getter).

@Getter
public abstract class ConfigurationDefinition<T> {

    private Class<T> type;
    ...

    public ConfigurationDefinition(...) {
        this.type = (Class<T>) ((ParameterizedType) this.getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0];
        ...
    }
}

Now to extend it without defining a new class. (Note the {} on the end... extended, but don't overwrite anything - unless you want to).

private ConfigurationDefinition<String> myConfigA = new ConfigurationDefinition<String>(...){};
private ConfigurationDefinition<File> myConfigB = new ConfigurationDefinition<File>(...){};
...
Class stringType = myConfigA.getType();
Class fileType = myConfigB.getType();
2

That is pretty straight forward. If you need from within the same class:

Class clazz = this.getClass();
ParameterizedType parameterizedType = (ParameterizedType) clazz.getGenericSuperclass();
try {
        Class typeClass = Class.forName( parameterizedType.getActualTypeArguments()[0].getTypeName() );
        // You have the instance of type 'T' in typeClass variable

        System.out.println( "Class instance name: "+  typeClass.getName() );
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        System.out.println( "ClassNotFound!! Something wrong! "+ e.getMessage() );
    }
2

Many people don't know this trick! Actually, I just found it today! It works like a dream! Just check this example out:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Date d=new Date();  //Or anything you want!
    printMethods(d);
}

public static <T> void printMethods(T t){
    Class<T> clazz= (Class<T>) t.getClass(); // There you go!
    for ( Method m : clazz.getMethods()){
        System.out.println( m.getName() );
    }
}
4
  • 2
    Which problem does this code actually solve? Change the method declaration to public static void printMethods(Object t) and it will do exactly the same. There is no “trick” in this answer but just an obsolete type parameter.
    – Holger
    Jun 22, 2021 at 7:08
  • @Holger What if user wants to get the constructors of the object and call them to create new objects of that type?
    – Omid.N
    Jun 23, 2021 at 5:06
  • Actually you can call getConstructures() on clazz to do it. Now the question is why the OP wants to get the T.class where he can just do t.getClass() ?
    – Omid.N
    Jun 23, 2021 at 5:24
  • 2
    I asked what problem your code tries to solve. Asking “what if the user wants something else not shown in the answer” is not not an answer. Yes you can call getConstructors on a Class object. 1) but your code doesn’t 2) but it still doesn’t justify the use of the type parameter. The result of t.getClass() is Class<? extends Object>, whether you declare the parameter as T or Object. It makes no difference. You have an unchecked type cast (Class<T>) in your code. That’s not better than using getClass().getConstructor().newInstance() casting the result to whatever your want.
    – Holger
    Jun 23, 2021 at 6:49
2

I've created an example based on one of two most promising solutions here from this question.

The result is however not so promising, at least for my use case.

Only one approach is working, but you need a super class containing the method and the generic has to be set in the child class and cannot be assigned dynamically (which my use case sadly is)


import org.junit.jupiter.api.Test;

import java.lang.reflect.ParameterizedType;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;

import static org.junit.jupiter.api.Assertions.assertEquals;
import static org.junit.jupiter.api.Assertions.assertThrows;


public class GenericTest {

    /**
     * only this will work!
     */
    @Test
    void testGetGenericTypeClassFromChildClassWithSpecifiedType() {
        TestClassWithSpecifiedType parent = new TestClassWithSpecifiedType();
        assertEquals(SomeGenericType.class, parent.getGenericTypeClass());
    }

    /**
     * won't work!
     */
    @Test
    void testGetGenericTypeClassFromChildClassWithUnspecifiedType() {
        TestClassWithUnspecifiedType<SomeGenericType> parent = new TestClassWithUnspecifiedType<>();
        assertThrows(IllegalStateException.class, parent::getGenericTypeClass);
    }

    /**
     * won't work
     */
    @Test
    void testGetGenericTypeClassWithUnspecifiedType() {
        SomeGenericTypedClass<SomeGenericType> parent = new SomeGenericTypedClass<>();
        assertThrows(IllegalStateException.class, parent::getGenericTypeClass);
    }

    /**
     * won't work
     * returns object instead!
     */
    @Test
    void testGetLoadedClassFromObject() {
        Foo<SomeGenericType> foo = new Foo<>();
        Class<?> barClass = foo.getBarClass();
        assertEquals(SomeGenericType.class, barClass);
    }

    /**
     * A class that has specified the type parameter
     */
    public static class TestClassWithSpecifiedType extends AbstractGenericTypedClass<SomeGenericType> {

    }

    /**
     * A class where the type parameter will be specified on demand
     *
     * @param <T>
     */
    public static class TestClassWithUnspecifiedType<T> extends AbstractGenericTypedClass<T> {

    }

    /**
     * An abstract class, because otherwise finding the parameter will not work
     */
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static abstract class AbstractGenericTypedClass<T> {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public Class<T> getGenericTypeClass() {
            try {
                String className = ((ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0].getTypeName();
                Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);
                return (Class<T>) clazz;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                throw new IllegalStateException("Class is not parametrized with generic type!!! Please use extends <> ");
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * A typed class without abstract super class
     *
     * @param <T>
     */
    public static class SomeGenericTypedClass<T> {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public Class<T> getGenericTypeClass() {
            try {
                String className = ((ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0].getTypeName();
                Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);
                return (Class<T>) clazz;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                throw new IllegalStateException("Class is not parametrized with generic type!!! Please use extends <> ");
            }
        }
    }


    /**
     * Some generic type - won't work with primitives such as String, Integer, Double!
     */
    public static class SomeGenericType {

    }

    public static class Foo<T> {
        // The class:
        private final Class<?> barClass;

        public Foo() {
            try {
                // Im giving it [0] cuz Bar is the first TypeParam
                Type[] bounds = getClass().getTypeParameters()[0].getBounds();
                // Here, we get the class now:
                barClass = Class.forName(bounds[0].getTypeName());
            } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
                // will never happen!
                throw new Error("Something impossible happened!", e);
            }
        }

        public Class<?> getBarClass() {
            return barClass;
        }
    }
}

I do not really understand why this has to be so complicated, but I bet there have to be some technical limitations for the dynamically setting of parameters.

1
   public <T> T yourMethodSignature(Class<T> type) {

        // get some object and check the type match the given type
        Object result = ...            

        if (type.isAssignableFrom(result.getClass())) {
            return (T)result;
        } else {
            // handle the error
        }
   }
1

If you are extending or implementing any class/interface that are using generics , you may get the Generic Type of parent class/interface, without modifying any existing class/interface at all.

There could be three possibilities,

Case 1 When your class is extending a class that is using Generics

public class TestGenerics {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Type type = TestMySuperGenericType.class.getGenericSuperclass();
        Type[] gTypes = ((ParameterizedType)type).getActualTypeArguments();
        for(Type gType : gTypes){
            System.out.println("Generic type:"+gType.toString());
        }
    }
}

class GenericClass<T> {
    public void print(T obj){};
}

class TestMySuperGenericType extends GenericClass<Integer> {
}

Case 2 When your class is implementing an interface that is using Generics

public class TestGenerics {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Type[] interfaces = TestMySuperGenericType.class.getGenericInterfaces();
        for(Type type : interfaces){
            Type[] gTypes = ((ParameterizedType)type).getActualTypeArguments();
            for(Type gType : gTypes){
                System.out.println("Generic type:"+gType.toString());
            }
        }
    }
}

interface GenericClass<T> {
    public void print(T obj);
}

class TestMySuperGenericType implements GenericClass<Integer> {
    public void print(Integer obj){}
}

Case 3 When your interface is extending an interface that is using Generics

public class TestGenerics {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Type[] interfaces = TestMySuperGenericType.class.getGenericInterfaces();
        for(Type type : interfaces){
            Type[] gTypes = ((ParameterizedType)type).getActualTypeArguments();
            for(Type gType : gTypes){
                System.out.println("Generic type:"+gType.toString());
            }
        }
    }
}

interface GenericClass<T> {
    public void print(T obj);
}

interface TestMySuperGenericType extends GenericClass<Integer> {
}
0

Actually, I suppose you have a field in your class of type T. If there's no field of type T, what's the point of having a generic Type? So, you can simply do an instanceof on that field.

In my case, I have a

List<T> items;
in my class, and I check if the class type is "Locality" by

if (items.get(0) instanceof Locality) ...

Of course, this only works if the total number of possible classes is limited.

1
  • 4
    What do I do if items.isEmpty() is true? May 24, 2013 at 19:21
0

This question is old, but now the best is use google Gson.

An example to get custom viewModel.

Class<CustomViewModel<String>> clazz = new GenericClass<CustomViewModel<String>>().getRawType();
CustomViewModel<String> viewModel = viewModelProvider.get(clazz);

Generic type class

class GenericClass<T>(private val rawType: Class<*>) {

    constructor():this(`$Gson$Types`.getRawType(object : TypeToken<T>() {}.getType()))

    fun getRawType(): Class<T> {
        return rawType as Class<T>
    }
}
0

I wanted to pass T.class to a method which make use of Generics

The method readFile reads a .csv file specified by the fileName with fullpath. There can be csv files with different contents hence i need to pass the model file class so that i can get the appropriate objects. Since this is reading csv file i wanted to do in a generic way. For some reason or other none of the above solutions worked for me. I need to use Class<? extends T> type to make it work. I use opencsv library for parsing the CSV files.

private <T>List<T> readFile(String fileName, Class<? extends T> type) {

    List<T> dataList = new ArrayList<T>();
    try {
        File file = new File(fileName);

        Reader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file)));
        Reader headerReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file)));

        CSVReader csvReader = new CSVReader(headerReader);
        // create csv bean reader
        CsvToBean<T> csvToBean = new CsvToBeanBuilder(reader)
                .withType(type)
                .withIgnoreLeadingWhiteSpace(true)
                .build();

        dataList = csvToBean.parse();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {
        logger.error("Error: ", ex);
    }

    return dataList;
}

This is how the readFile method is called

List<RigSurfaceCSV> rigSurfaceCSVDataList = readSurfaceFile(surfaceFileName, RigSurfaceCSV.class);
-4

I'm using workaround for this:

class MyClass extends Foo<T> {
....
}

MyClass myClassInstance = MyClass.class.newInstance();
0

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