33

My understanding is that private means being private to an instance. Private methods can't be called with an explicit receiver, even self. To call a private method, I have to go through a process like below:

class Sample
  def foo
    baz
  end

  private
  def baz

  end
 end 

Sample.new.foo

This will call the private baz method. Is there a way to directly call a private method with an explicit receiver?

2
  • It is not clear what you mean by "private to an instance".
    – sawa
    Dec 20 '15 at 11:15
  • 3
    What is the whole point of making a method private if you want to call with an explicit receiver? The sole purpose of making a method private is to avoid that.
    – sawa
    Dec 20 '15 at 11:18
57

Yes, this is possible with Kernel#send:

receiver.send :method_name, parameters

Though there are workarounds like BasicObject#instance_eval, or Kernel#binding manipulations, the common way to call private method is to call send on the receiver.

6
  • If there is such a way to overcome the private restriction, then I don't understand why there has to be a way to write the method in private scope. Can you explain me?
    – RAJ
    May 30 '17 at 6:50
  • 1
    @RAJ Ruby is driving on contracts and private modifier is a contract that would prevent you and your users from accidentally calling the method in a standard way, by receiver.method_name. OTOH, since Ruby classes are open and everybody is still allowed to completely overwrite any method in any class, that makes no sense to artificially prevent of calling private methods. BTW, even in Java one could easily call private methods using reflection. May 30 '17 at 7:00
  • Okay, So there is no use of Private other than to avoid user accidentally calling out certain methods? What I have been taught was, private is designed only to establish the security!(Not to call). If I can circumvent almost any sort of access restriction, protection, hiding, and encapsulation then It seems to be illogical,eh?
    – RAJ
    May 30 '17 at 7:26
  • @RAJ It does not seem illogical. After all, we still have an ability to call whatever we want in all the languages we have so far. The question is about how deep the language syntax hides these abilities. Ruby does not bury them deep, for the sake of providing the best experience for the programmers. But still, even in BASIC, COBOL or Go one still can call whatever wanted, it’s just a matter of putting more effort and fight more dragons on the path. May 30 '17 at 7:31
  • Okay, Make sense! Thank you!
    – RAJ
    May 30 '17 at 7:39
8

Using BasicObject#instance_eval, you can call private method.

class Sample
  private
  def baz
    'baz called'
  end
end

Sample.new.instance_eval('baz')
# => 'baz called'
Sample.new.instance_eval { baz }
# => 'baz called'
2

There are two levels on which your question can be answered: the base language level and the reflective meta-level.

On the base language level, the answer is blatantly obvious if you just contrast the definition of privacy with your question:

private methods can only be called without an explicit receiver

and

can I call a private without an explicit receiver?

The answer is obviously "No", the two sentences directly contradict each other.

On the reflective meta-level, however, the answer is "Yes". In fact, you can do pretty much anything on the meta-level and circumvent almost any sort of access restriction, protection, hiding, and encapsulation.

Object#send, whose main purpose is to allow you to call a method whose name you don't know until runtime, also has the additional side-effect of circumventing access restrictions like private and protected. (It also ignores Refinements, which is an important restriction you should be aware of!)

1

As shown in the other answers, you can use send to call a private method. However, this can make for some untidy code.

If you really need your method to be publicly accessible on instances of your class, you could just reset the visibility of the method. Assuming the class isn't defined within your code, simply reopen it and set the visibility of the method:

class Sample
  public :baz
end

Now you can call it:

s = Sample.new
s.baz
# => 'baz called'

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