154

I have a list of size < N and I want to pad it up to the size N with a value.

Certainly, I can use something like the following, but I feel that there should be something I missed:

>>> N = 5
>>> a = [1]
>>> map(lambda x, y: y if x is None else x, a, ['']*N)
[1, '', '', '', '']
4
  • Why do you want to do this? There is probably a better way.
    – Katriel
    Aug 9, 2010 at 9:34
  • I serialize the list into a tab-separated string with the fixed number of columns.
    – newtover
    Aug 9, 2010 at 9:44
  • Do you mean you are doing something like '\t'.join([1,'','','',''])? Maybe you can tell us more about what you intend to implement, then we can try to come up with a idea.
    – satoru
    Aug 9, 2010 at 10:07
  • @Satoru.Logic: yes, print >> a_stream, '\t'.join(the_list) is all I want to implement
    – newtover
    Aug 9, 2010 at 12:47

14 Answers 14

244
a += [''] * (N - len(a))

or if you don't want to change a in place

new_a = a + [''] * (N - len(a))

you can always create a subclass of list and call the method whatever you please

class MyList(list):
    def ljust(self, n, fillvalue=''):
        return self + [fillvalue] * (n - len(self))

a = MyList(['1'])
b = a.ljust(5, '')
0
45

I think this approach is more visual and pythonic.

a = (a + N * [''])[:N]
11
  • 5
    This takes me half a minute to understand. The accepted answer is much more straightforward. Dec 11, 2019 at 2:43
  • 6
    @RichardMöhn "pythonic" means "idiomatic". The longer you use Python, the more natural you will find this syntax. Dec 20, 2019 at 3:37
  • 16
    I know what ‘pythonic’ means. And I've been using Python continuously since 2014. I still don't find your answer natural. Dec 21, 2019 at 8:33
  • 3
    What makes it pythonic to construct an intermediate throw-away list?
    – DylanYoung
    Feb 24, 2020 at 17:40
  • 1
    @DylanYoung this is not the case for first when N < len(a). It is the case for the second answer you provided.
    – kon psych
    Apr 6, 2020 at 15:24
32

There is no built-in function for this. But you could compose the built-ins for your task (or anything :p).

(Modified from itertool's padnone and take recipes)

from itertools import chain, repeat, islice

def pad_infinite(iterable, padding=None):
   return chain(iterable, repeat(padding))

def pad(iterable, size, padding=None):
   return islice(pad_infinite(iterable, padding), size)

Usage:

>>> list(pad([1,2,3], 7, ''))
[1, 2, 3, '', '', '', '']
1
  • Nice approach: chain(iterable, repeat(padding))
    – RoyM
    Dec 23, 2020 at 22:22
11

more-itertools is a library that includes a special padded tool for this kind of problem:

import more_itertools as mit

list(mit.padded(a, "", N))
# [1, '', '', '', '']

Alternatively, more_itertools also implements Python itertools recipes including padnone and take as mentioned by @kennytm, so they don't have to be reimplemented:

list(mit.take(N, mit.padnone(a)))
# [1, None, None, None, None]

If you wish to replace the default None padding, use a list comprehension:

["" if i is None else i for i in mit.take(N, mit.padnone(a))]
# [1, '', '', '', '']
8

gnibbler's answer is nicer, but if you need a builtin, you could use itertools.izip_longest (zip_longest in Py3k):

itertools.izip_longest( xrange( N ), list )

which will return a list of tuples ( i, list[ i ] ) filled-in to None. If you need to get rid of the counter, do something like:

map( itertools.itemgetter( 1 ), itertools.izip_longest( xrange( N ), list ) )
2
  • 1
    I knew about izip_longest but resulting the code does not look nice =)
    – newtover
    Aug 9, 2010 at 12:24
  • 2
    I believe you mean operator.itemgetter(). Also the None values needed to be replaced with "".
    – pylang
    Aug 22, 2017 at 18:42
5

You could also use a simple generator without any build ins. But I would not pad the list, but let the application logic deal with an empty list.

Anyhow, iterator without buildins

def pad(iterable, padding='.', length=7):
    '''
    >>> iterable = [1,2,3]
    >>> list(pad(iterable))
    [1, 2, 3, '.', '.', '.', '.']
    '''
    for count, i in enumerate(iterable):
        yield i
    while count < length - 1:
        count += 1
        yield padding

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
5

If you want to pad with None instead of '', map() does the job:

>>> map(None,[1,2,3],xrange(7))

[(1, 0), (2, 1), (3, 2), (None, 3), (None, 4), (None, 5), (None, 6)]

>>> zip(*map(None,[1,2,3],xrange(7)))[0]

(1, 2, 3, None, None, None, None)
1
  • 2
    To say frankly, a+['']*(N-len(a)) looks much clearer. Besides, it lacks casting to list. But thank you anyway.
    – newtover
    Jan 6, 2011 at 20:53
4
extra_length = desired_length - len(l)
l.extend(value for _ in range(extra_length))

This avoids any extra allocation, unlike any solution that depends on creating and appending the list [value] * extra_length. The "extend" method first calls __length_hint__ on the iterator, and extends the allocation for l by that much before filling it in from the iterator.

2
  • More concisely, a.extend((N-len(a))*[padding_value]) (I'm using OP notation).
    – mmj
    Jan 28, 2021 at 11:06
  • Your proposal involves allocating a list, then using "extend" to append it. Mine avoids the extra allocation; no new list is created, only a generator object. Jan 29, 2021 at 14:02
4

you can use * iterable unpacking operator:

N = 5
a = [1]

pad_value = ''
pad_size = N - len(a)

final_list = [*a, *[pad_value] * pad_size]
print(final_list)

output:

[1, '', '', '', '']
3

To go off of kennytm:

def pad(l, size, padding):
    return l + [padding] * abs((len(l)-size))

>>> l = [1,2,3]
>>> pad(l, 7, 0)
[1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 0, 0]
0
3

Using iterators and taking advantage of the default argument for next:

i = iter(a)
a = [next(i, '') for _ in range(N)]

Short explanation:

Either way we want to produce N items. Hence the for _ in range(N). Then the elements should be as much as we can from a and the rest ''. Using an iterator over a we grab all possible elements, and when we get StopIteration, the default will be returned which is ''.

2

Adding the padding before the list of elements

a[:0] += [''] * (N - len(a))

Adding the padding after the list of elements

a += [''] * (N - len(a))
1

Adding to the existing list with np.repeat:

import numpy as np
a + list(np.repeat([''], (N - len(a))))
-1

A pythonic way to pad your list with empty elements is using list comprehension.

        my_list = [1,2]
        desired_len = 3
        # Ensure that the length of my list is 3 elements
        [my_list.extend(['']) for _ in range(desired_len - len(my_list))]
        [my_list.pop() for _ in range(len(my_list)-desired_len )]

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