9

So I am extremely new to the Javascript world. I was practicing on codewars having to analyze a pin to make sure it only contained numbers and was either 4 or 6 characters. I looked at the most clever code and the answer was:

function validatePIN(pin) {
  return /^(\d{4}|\d{6})$/.test(pin)
}

I've never seen the "/^(\d{4}|\d{6})$/" bit before. Could anyone tell me what this is called so I can research it on my own, or give me a breakdown of how it works?

  • 2
    Regular expression(regex) validation in javascript... – Tamil Selvan C Dec 21 '15 at 4:43
  • 2
    MDN: RegExp.prototype.test – Bergi Dec 21 '15 at 11:09
  • @sysk The intent of the original is clearer (though indeed equivalent). And "efficiency" in this context is silly-- even if the parens made a difference, you're not matching gigabytes of PINs. – alexis Dec 21 '15 at 13:39
  • 1
    Trick? They are there to ensure that ^ and $ apply to each of the alternatives (since /^\d{4}|\d{6}$/ matches ^\d{4} or \d{6}$). But never mind, "clear" is really a matter of taste in this case... – alexis Dec 21 '15 at 18:19
  • 1
    @syck It would be easy to assume so, but check it to see extra parens are needed. But yes, it would me more efficient "at the cost of readability" (ie. not as expressive) but reading RegExps is the same one way or the other – CSᵠ Dec 21 '15 at 23:25
19

It's a regular expression literal, similar to using return new RegExp('^(\\d{4}|\\d{6})$').test(pin) The "literal" part implies that it's a means of representing a specific data type as a string in code—just like true and 'true' are different, as one is a boolean literal and the other is a string literal.

Specifically, the regex ^(\d{4}|\d{6})$ breaks down to:

^       a string that starts with...
(       either
  \d    a digit (0-9)...
  {4}   that repeats four times...
|       or
  \d    a digit (0-9)...
  {6}   that repeats six times...
)
$       and then ends

So: '1234', '123456', etc would match. '123.00', '12345','abc123',' 1234', ' 1234 ' would not match.

As noted by several others in the comments on Draco18s' answer there are several nuances to be aware of with using regex literals in JS:

  • The literal syntax doesn't require you to escape special characters within the regex pattern. Using the RegExp constructor requires you to represent the pattern as a string, which in turn requires escaping. Note the differences of the \'s between the two syntaxes.

  • Using a regex literal will treat the regex as a constant, whereas using new RegExp() leaves life cycle management of the regex instance up to you.

    The literal notation is compiled and implies a constant regex, whereas the constructor version is reparsed from the string, and so the literal is better optimized/cached. jsperf.com/regexp-literal-vs-constructor/4 Note: you can get basically the same effect by caching the new Regex in a variable, but the literal one is cached at the JIT step – user120242

    In other words, using a regex literal can avoid potential performance pitfalls:

    Example:

    for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
      // Instantiates 1x Regex per iteration
      var constructed = new RegExp('^(\\d{4}|\\d{6})$') 
    
      // Instantiates 1 Regex
      var literal = /^(\d{4}|\d{6})$/ 
    }
    
  • 3
    Vunderbar. I think this answer in fact covers everything brought up about this question and in more detail. – Draco18s no longer trusts SE Dec 21 '15 at 16:54
26

It's a regular expression.

I tend to use http://www.regexpal.com/ when I want to try and find the expression I need, there's also http://regexr.com/ for learning about them (among other resources).

  • 13
    it's a regex literal; more specifically. The leading and trailing /'s aren't part of the regex, but tell Javascript to treat everything between them as one. It's shorthand for new Regex('^(\d{4}|\d{6})$') – STW Dec 21 '15 at 4:52
  • 4
    @STW: Your shorthand doesn't work due to lack of escaping. You need \\d{4}, since \ needs to be escaped in string literal. – nhahtdh Dec 21 '15 at 8:50
  • 3
    @STW ... and that's why you should prefer the short syntax if you can use it. It's the right way, not a shorthand. – edc65 Dec 21 '15 at 8:57
  • 5
    As others have noted: it is not a simple shorthand for the Regex constructor. The literal notation is compiled and implies a constant Regex, whereas the constructor version is reparsed from the string, and so the literal is better optimized/cached. jsperf.com/regexp-literal-vs-constructor/4 Note: you can get basically the same effect by caching the new Regex in a variable, but the literal one is cached at the JIT step – user120242 Dec 21 '15 at 9:55
  • 4
    To all: why does such a question receive so many upvotes? The tiniest amount of research would have answered this effortlessly, IMHO. No offense toward answers. Do you all think so as well? – cadaniluk Dec 21 '15 at 11:57
14

Good reference for Javascript RegExp
http://www.regular-expressions.info/javascript.html

^ beginning of line
\d = all digits
{4} = repetition 4 times
| = "or"
$ end of line

your example tests for a 4 digit string or 6 digit string

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.