4

Is there a way to use the _Generic keyword multiple times in the same expression to create a single string literal?

What I am looking for is a way to for example generate a single format string to pass to printf, with all the conversion specifiers adapted to the proper types.

When writing this answer I ended up with a rather ugly work-around:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
   int a;
   char b;
   long c;
} ABC;

// printf conversion specifiers:
#define CS(x)   \
  _Generic((x), \
    int:  "%d", \
    char: "%c", \
    long: "%ld")


int main (void)
{
  ABC abc = {1, 'a', 2};

  printf(CS(abc.a), abc.a); printf(" ");
  printf(CS(abc.b), abc.b); printf(" ");
  printf(CS(abc.c), abc.c); printf(" ");

  return 0;
}

6 printf calls instead of 1, hardly ideal.

The problem is that I can't find a way to combine _Generic and string literal concatenation by the pre-processor, like this:

printf(CS(abc.a) " ", abc.a); // doesnt work
printf(CS(abc.a) CS(abc.b), abc.a, abc.b); // doesnt work either

Because apparently generic macros don't count as string literals in the pre-processor, so string literal concatenation isn't possible. I toyed around with "stringification" macros but no luck there.

3
  • 1
    Yes, _Generic is a primary expression and is only evaluated in a later compilation phase, after the string literal fusion has been performed. The reason for that is simple, _Generic needs type information that isn't available in the preprocessor phase. Dec 21, 2015 at 10:33
  • @JensGustedt Ah, so it is simply not possible then. That's too bad... I suppose I'll have to come up with some other solution which isn't based on the pre-processor, yet is evaluated at compile time.
    – Lundin
    Dec 21, 2015 at 10:39
  • In P99 I have kind of solved this the other way around. The type generic stuff is done on the evaluation of the ... arguments and transforms them into calls to formating functions that all return a string. In the format string itself you then only have to place %s. But in its current form this is quite hacky. gcc 4.9 handles it very badly and blows up compilation to a memory footprint that sometimes exceeds the 2GiB barrier. Dec 21, 2015 at 11:21

3 Answers 3

2

I'm going to say that the answer is NO.

First, the _Generic keyword is not (and cannot possibly be) a pre-processor directive. A generic-selection is a primary expression, as defined in section 6.5.1. Given the input

printf(CS(abc.a) "hello", abc.a);

the output from the preprocessor (generated by the -E compiler option) is:

printf(_Generic((abc.a), int: "%d", char: "%c", long: "%ld") "hello", abc.a);

Notice that string concatenation is not possible because the generic-selection has not been evaluated. Also note that it's impossible for the pre-processor to evaluate since it requires knowledge that abc is a structure of type ABC, that has member a. The pre-processor does simple text substitution, it has no knowledge of such things.

Second, the compiler phases defined in section 5.1.1.2 don't allow evaluation of _Generic keywords before string concatenation. The relevant phases, quoted from the spec, are

  1. Adjacent string literal tokens are concatenated.

  2. White-space characters separating tokens are no longer significant. Each preprocessing token is converted into a token. The resulting tokens are syntactically and semantically analyzed and translated as a translation unit.

The _Generic keyword must be evaluated in phase 7, since it requires knowledge that is only available after tokens have been syntactically and semantically analyzed, e.g. that abc is a structure with member a. Hence, multiple _Generic keywords cannot take advantage of string concatenation to produce a single string literal.

1
  • 1
    I'll accept this answer as the correct one, as it contains a nice explanation why my original idea wouldn't work. However, I couldn't resist inventing a horrible hack just for the sake of it :)
    – Lundin
    Dec 21, 2015 at 13:42
2

Nice question, you can paste a string passing another parameter:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int a;
    char b;
    long c;
} ABC;

// printf conversion specifiers:
#define CS2(x, y)   \
    _Generic((x), \
     int:  "%d" y, \
     char: "%c" y, \
     long: "%ld" y) 

int main (void)
{
    ABC abc = {1, 'a', 2};

    printf(CS2(abc.a, "Hello"), abc.a);
    return 0;
}
2
  • But what if I want 3 or more strings? Then it just keeps piling up nested macro calls.
    – Lundin
    Dec 21, 2015 at 9:52
  • Actually, it doesn't work if combined with a second _Generic statement. Consider printf(CS2(abc.a, CS2(abc.b, "hello")), abc.a);. Still the same problem as I ran into.
    – Lundin
    Dec 21, 2015 at 10:34
1

Just for the record, it turns out it is possible to generate a string constant based on _Generic at compile-time, by using other dirty tricks than those available from the pre-processor.

The solution I came up with is so ugly that I barely dare to post it, but I'll do so just to prove it possible.

Don't write code like this!

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
   int a;
   char b;
   long c;
} ABC;

// printf conversion specifiers:
#define CS(x)   \
  _Generic((x), \
    int:  "%d", \
    char: "%c", \
    long: "%ld")

#pragma pack(push, 1)
#define print2(arg1,arg2)              \
{                                      \
  typedef struct                       \
  {                                    \
    char arr1 [sizeof(CS(arg1))-1];    \
    char space;                        \
    char arr2 [sizeof(CS(arg2))-1];    \
    char nl_nul[2];                    \
  } struct_t;                          \
                                       \
  typedef union                        \
  {                                    \
    struct_t struc;                    \
    char     arr [sizeof(struct_t)];   \
  } cs2_t;                             \
                                       \
  const cs2_t cs2 =                    \
  {                                    \
    .struc.arr1 = CS(arg1),            \
    .struc.space = ' ',                \
    .struc.arr2 = CS(arg2),            \
    .struc.nl_nul = "\n"               \
  };                                   \
                                       \
  printf(cs2.arr, arg1, arg2);         \
}
#pragma pack(pop)

int main (void)
{
  ABC abc = {1, 'a', 2};

  print2(abc.a, abc.b);
  print2(abc.a, abc.c);
  print2(abc.b, abc.c);

  return 0;
}

Output:

1 a
1 2
a 2

Explanation:

The macro print2 is a wrapper around printf and prints exactly 2 arguments, no matter type, with their correct conversion specifiers.

It builds up a string based on a struct, to which the conversion specifier string literals are passed. Each array place-holder for such a conversion specifier was purposely declared too small to fit the null termination.

Finally, this struct is dumped into a union which can interpret the whole struct as a single string. Of course this is quite questionable practice (even though it doesn't violate strict aliasing): if there is any padding then the program will fail.

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