20

Is there a System.Lazy<T> without exception caching? Or another nice solution for lazy multithreading initialization & caching?

I've got following program (fiddle it here):

using System;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Net;

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
    public class Program
    {
        public class LightsaberProvider
        {
            private static int _firstTime = 1;

            public LightsaberProvider()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("LightsaberProvider ctor");
            }

            public string GetFor(string jedi)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("LightsaberProvider.GetFor jedi: {0}", jedi);

                Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
                if (jedi == "2" && 1 == Interlocked.Exchange(ref _firstTime, 0))
                {
                    throw new Exception("Dark side happened...");
                }

                Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
                return string.Format("Lightsaver for: {0}", jedi);
            }
        }

        public class LightsabersCache
        {
            private readonly LightsaberProvider _lightsaberProvider;
            private readonly ConcurrentDictionary<string, Lazy<string>> _producedLightsabers;

            public LightsabersCache(LightsaberProvider lightsaberProvider)
            {
                _lightsaberProvider = lightsaberProvider;
                _producedLightsabers = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, Lazy<string>>();
            }

            public string GetLightsaber(string jedi)
            {
                Lazy<string> result;
                if (!_producedLightsabers.TryGetValue(jedi, out result))
                {
                    result = _producedLightsabers.GetOrAdd(jedi, key => new Lazy<string>(() =>
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Lazy Enter");
                        var light = _lightsaberProvider.GetFor(jedi);
                        Console.WriteLine("Lightsaber produced");
                        return light;
                    }, LazyThreadSafetyMode.ExecutionAndPublication));
                }
                return result.Value;
            }
        }

        public void Main()
        {
            Test();
            Console.WriteLine("Maximum 1 'Dark side happened...' strings on the console there should be. No more, no less.");
            Console.WriteLine("Maximum 5 lightsabers produced should be. No more, no less.");
        }

        private static void Test()
        {
            var cache = new LightsabersCache(new LightsaberProvider());

            Parallel.For(0, 15, t =>
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        var result = cache.GetLightsaber((t % 5).ToString());
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
                    }
                    Thread.Sleep(25);
                }
            });
        }
    }
}

Basically I want to cache produced lightsabers, but producing them is expensive and tricky - sometimes exceptions may happen. I want to allow only one producer at time for given jedi, but when exception is thrown - I want another producer to try again. Therefore, desired behavior is like System.Lazy<T> with LazyThreadSafetyMode.ExecutionAndPublication option, but without exceptions caching.

All in all, following technical requirements must be meet:

  • we want a thread-safe cache
  • the cache is a key-value cache. Let's simplify it and the key is type of string and the value is also type of string
  • producing an item is expensive - thus production must be started by one and only one thread for given key. Production for key "a" doesn't block production for key "b"
  • if production ended in success - we want to cache the produced item
  • if during production exception is thrown - we want to pass the exception to the caller. The caller's responsibility is to decide about retry/giving up/logging. Exception isn't cached - next call to the cache for this item will start the item production.

In my example:

  • we have LightsabersCache, LightsabersCache.GetLightsaber method gets the value for given key
  • LightsaberProvider is only a dummy provider. It mimics production nature: the production is expensive (2 seconds), and sometimes (in this case only first time, for key="2") exception is thrown
  • the program starts 15 threads and each thread tries 10 times to get the value from range <0;4>. Only one time exception is thrown, so only one time we should see "Dark side happened...". There are 5 keys in the range <0;4> so only 5 "Lightsaber produced" messages should be on the console. We should see 6 times the message "LightsaberProvider.GetFor jedi: x" because one time for each key + one failed for key "2".
4
  • You can switch to Task with continuation on error handler
    – VMAtm
    Dec 21, 2015 at 10:58
  • Could you elaborate further on this?
    – piotrwest
    Dec 21, 2015 at 18:53
  • Consider stackoverflow.com/a/42567351/34092 .
    – mjwills
    Sep 21, 2018 at 0:13
  • That's a different use case. What's more, your solution is less testable and can't allow existence of two caches at the same time.
    – piotrwest
    Sep 24, 2018 at 5:54

7 Answers 7

12

Actually, this feature is debated: Introduce a fourth type of LazyThreadSafetyMode: ThreadSafeValueOnly.

To wait, I use this graceful implementation from Marius Gundersen: Lazy (and AsyncLazy) don't handle exceptions very well.

public class AtomicLazy<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T> _factory;
    private T _value;
    private bool _initialized;
    private object _lock;

    public AtomicLazy(Func<T> factory)
    {
        _factory = factory;
    }

    public T Value => LazyInitializer.EnsureInitialized(ref _value, ref _initialized, ref _lock, _factory);
}
9

It's hard to use built-in Lazy for that: you should wrap your LazyWithoutExceptionCaching.Value getter in a lock. But that makes the use of the built-in Lazy redundant: you'll have unnecessary locks inside the Lazy.Value getter.

It's better to write your own Lazy implementation especially if you intend to instantiate reference types only, it turns to be rather simple:

public class SimpleLazy<T> where T : class
{
    private readonly Func<T> valueFactory;
    private T instance;
    private readonly object locker = new object();

    public SimpleLazy(Func<T> valueFactory)
    {
        this.valueFactory = valueFactory;
        this.instance = null;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            lock (locker)
                return instance ?? (instance = valueFactory());
        }
    }
}

P.S. Maybe we'll have this functionality built-in when this issue gets closed.

8

The two existing answers by vernou and tsul (AtomicLazy<T> and SimpleLazy<T> respectively) solve sufficiently this problem, but they both exhibit a behavior that is not entirely to my liking. In case the valueFactory fails, all the threads that are currently in sleep mode waiting for the Value, will retry again the valueFactory one by one. This means that if for example 100 threads request the Value at the same time, and the valueFactory takes 1 second before it fails, the valueFactory will be invoked 100 times, and the last thread in the list will wait for 100 seconds before getting the exception.

Arguably a better behavior is to propagate the error of the valueFactory to all threads that are currently waiting. This way no thread is going to wait for a response for longer than the duration of a single valueFactory invocation. Below is an implementation of a LazyWithRetry<T> class with this behavior:

/// <summary>
/// Represents the result of an action that is invoked lazily on demand, and can be
/// retried as many times as needed until it succeeds, while enforcing a
/// non-overlapping execution policy.
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>
/// In case the action is successful, it is never invoked again. In case of failure
/// the error is propagated to the invoking thread, as well as to all other threads
/// that are currently waiting for the result. The error is not cached. The action
/// will be invoked again when the next thread requests the result, repeating the
/// same pattern.
/// </remarks>
public class LazyWithRetry<T>
{
    private volatile Lazy<T> _lazy;

    public LazyWithRetry(Func<T> valueFactory)
    {
        ArgumentNullException.ThrowIfNull(valueFactory);
        T GetValue()
        {
            try { return valueFactory(); }
            catch { _lazy = new(GetValue); throw; }
        }
        _lazy = new(GetValue);
    }

    public T Value => _lazy.Value;
}

A demonstration of the LazyWithRetry<T> class can be found here. Below is a sample output of this demo:

20:13:12.283  [4] > Worker #1 before requesting value
20:13:12.303  [4] > **Value factory invoked
20:13:12.380  [5] > Worker #2 before requesting value
20:13:12.481  [6] > Worker #3 before requesting value
20:13:12.554  [4] > --Worker #1 failed: Oops! (1)
20:13:12.555  [5] > --Worker #2 failed: Oops! (1)
20:13:12.555  [6] > --Worker #3 failed: Oops! (1)
20:13:12.581  [7] > Worker #4 before requesting value
20:13:12.581  [7] > **Value factory invoked
20:13:12.681  [8] > Worker #5 before requesting value
20:13:12.781  [9] > Worker #6 before requesting value
20:13:12.831  [7] > --Worker #4 failed: Oops! (2)
20:13:12.831  [9] > --Worker #6 failed: Oops! (2)
20:13:12.832  [8] > --Worker #5 failed: Oops! (2)
20:13:12.881 [10] > Worker #7 before requesting value
20:13:12.881 [10] > **Value factory invoked
20:13:12.981 [11] > Worker #8 before requesting value
20:13:13.081 [12] > Worker #9 before requesting value
20:13:13.131 [10] > --Worker #7 received value: 3
20:13:13.131 [11] > --Worker #8 received value: 3
20:13:13.132 [12] > --Worker #9 received value: 3
20:13:13.181 [13] > Worker #10 before requesting value
20:13:13.181 [13] > --Worker #10 received value: 3
20:13:13.182  [1] > Finished

And below is a sample output of the same demo, when using either an AtomicLazy<T> or a SimpleLazy<T> class:

20:13:38.192  [4] > Worker #1 before requesting value
20:13:38.212  [4] > **Value factory invoked
20:13:38.290  [5] > Worker #2 before requesting value
20:13:38.390  [6] > Worker #3 before requesting value
20:13:38.463  [5] > **Value factory invoked
20:13:38.463  [4] > --Worker #1 failed: Oops! (1)
20:13:38.490  [7] > Worker #4 before requesting value
20:13:38.590  [8] > Worker #5 before requesting value
20:13:38.690  [9] > Worker #6 before requesting value
20:13:38.713  [5] > --Worker #2 failed: Oops! (2)
20:13:38.713  [6] > **Value factory invoked
20:13:38.791 [10] > Worker #7 before requesting value
20:13:38.891 [11] > Worker #8 before requesting value
20:13:38.963  [6] > --Worker #3 received value: 3
20:13:38.964  [8] > --Worker #5 received value: 3
20:13:38.964  [7] > --Worker #4 received value: 3
20:13:38.964  [9] > --Worker #6 received value: 3
20:13:38.964 [10] > --Worker #7 received value: 3
20:13:38.964 [11] > --Worker #8 received value: 3
20:13:38.991 [12] > Worker #9 before requesting value
20:13:38.991 [12] > --Worker #9 received value: 3
20:13:39.091 [13] > Worker #10 before requesting value
20:13:39.091 [13] > --Worker #10 received value: 3
20:13:39.091  [1] > Finished

A more advanced (memory-optimized) implementation of the LazyWithRetry<T> class can be found in the 5th revision of this answer.

2
  • 1
    Using a local method over a delegate simplifies the code a bit when it's recursive; no need to declare a null delegate before defining it.
    – Servy
    Jun 10, 2022 at 20:38
  • 1
    Also note most of the other answers here hold a reference to the original delegate even after the value is successfully constructed, and this doesn't, so if there are closed over objects this implementation doesn't hold a reference to them after constructing the object the way other answers do. (Most other answers could assign the field to null somewhere to fix that, but this does it more cleanly by not having a field for it at all.)
    – Servy
    Jun 10, 2022 at 20:40
4

Unfortunately this is wrong solution! Please disregard it and use tsul answer. Leaving it only if you want to debug it and spot the bug.

Here is working solution (concurrent cache with factory) with tsul SimpleLazy: https://dotnetfiddle.net/Y2GP2z


I've ended up with following solution: wrapped Lazy to mimic the same functionality as Lazy but without exceptions cache.

Here is LazyWithoutExceptionsCaching class:

public class LazyWithoutExceptionCaching<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T> _valueFactory;
    private Lazy<T> _lazy;
     
    public LazyWithoutExceptionCaching(Func<T> valueFactory)
    {
        _valueFactory = valueFactory;
        _lazy = new Lazy<T>(valueFactory);
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            try
            {
                return _lazy.Value;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                _lazy = new Lazy<T>(_valueFactory);
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}

Full working example (FIDDLE it here):

using System;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Net;

namespace Rextester
{
    public class Program
    {
        public class LazyWithoutExceptionCaching<T>
        {
            private readonly Func<T> _valueFactory;
            private Lazy<T> _lazy;
             
            public LazyWithoutExceptionCaching(Func<T> valueFactory)
            {
                _valueFactory = valueFactory;
                _lazy = new Lazy<T>(valueFactory);
            }
    
            public T Value
            {
                get
                {
                    try
                    {
                        return _lazy.Value;
                    }
                    catch (Exception)
                    {
                        _lazy = new Lazy<T>(_valueFactory);
                        throw;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        
        public class LightsaberProvider
        {
            private static int _firstTime = 1;

            public LightsaberProvider()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("LightsaberProvider ctor");
            }

            public string GetFor(string jedi)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("LightsaberProvider.GetFor jedi: {0}", jedi);

                Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
                if (jedi == "2" && 1 == Interlocked.Exchange(ref _firstTime, 0))
                {
                    throw new Exception("Dark side happened...");
                }

                Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
                return string.Format("Lightsaver for: {0}", jedi);
            }
        }

        public class LightsabersCache
        {
            private readonly LightsaberProvider _lightsaberProvider;
            private readonly ConcurrentDictionary<string, LazyWithoutExceptionCaching<string>> _producedLightsabers;

            public LightsabersCache(LightsaberProvider lightsaberProvider)
            {
                _lightsaberProvider = lightsaberProvider;
                _producedLightsabers = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, LazyWithoutExceptionCaching<string>>();
            }

            public string GetLightsaber(string jedi)
            {
                LazyWithoutExceptionCaching<string> result;
                if (!_producedLightsabers.TryGetValue(jedi, out result))
                {
                    result = _producedLightsabers.GetOrAdd(jedi, key => new LazyWithoutExceptionCaching<string>(() =>
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Lazy Enter");
                        var light = _lightsaberProvider.GetFor(jedi);
                        Console.WriteLine("Lightsaber produced");
                        return light;
                    }));
                }
                return result.Value;
            }
        }
        
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test();
            Console.WriteLine("Maximum 1 'Dark side happened...' strings on the console there should be. No more, no less.");
            Console.WriteLine("Maximum 5 lightsabers produced should be. No more, no less.");
        }

        private static void Test()
        {
            var cache = new LightsabersCache(new LightsaberProvider());

            Parallel.For(0, 15, t =>
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        var result = cache.GetLightsaber((t % 5).ToString());
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
                    }
                    Thread.Sleep(25);
                }
            });
        }
    }
}
5
  • 5
    unfortunately this is not thread safe, since two threads can write to _lazy at the same time. You probably need a lock around it too.
    – Marius
    Jun 23, 2016 at 9:46
  • Well, isn't that the purpose of Lazy<T>? IMO you don't need a lock.
    – piotrwest
    Jun 26, 2016 at 11:55
  • 4
    yes, but the lock should be around the try/catch, not inside it. Two threads can get two different values if they try at the same time, so it's not thread safe.
    – Marius
    Jun 27, 2016 at 8:52
  • 2
    Unfortunately, it's really not thread safe: dotnetfiddle.net/Q4oYi8 It leads to valueFactory called more than once even when succeeded, that subverts all the idea of Lazy<T>.
    – tsul
    Oct 29, 2018 at 20:59
  • 2
    I see, you are completely right guys. I've changed accepted answer, and edited this answer stating the problem.
    – piotrwest
    Nov 2, 2018 at 3:55
0

As I mentioned in comment, you can ease your code by using the TPL library's Task object:

var resultTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(new Action<object>(
  (x) => GetFor(x)), rawData);
public string GetFor(string jedi)
{
    Console.WriteLine("LightsaberProvider.GetFor jedi: {0}", jedi);

    Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    if (jedi == "2" && 1 == Interlocked.Exchange(ref _firstTime, 0))
    {
        throw new Exception("Dark side happened...");
    }

    Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    return string.Format("Lightsaver for: {0}", jedi);
}

After that, you can wait for the result of this task like this:

resultTask.Wait();

Making this will cache the result of the operation for concrete x. If task runs correctly, you can examine the Result property. If task fails, the Exception property will store the AggregateException with inner actual exception. Result is cached and will not re-calculated. If task fails, it will throw its exception at calling the Result property or some other blocking methods of it. If you need a result for different argument, you should create a new task.

I encourage you to examine this library as you'll save your time for re-inventing the wheel :) Also you'll got some out-of box functionality as multithreading, exception handling, task cancellation and many many more. Good luck with your projects :)

8
  • I understand the concept of replacing Lazy with Task. However, how would you start exactly one task? ConcurrentDictionary can create redundant values when invoking method GetOrAdd with factory method. One more thing - even if you manage to block invocation of factory method multiple times, how would you replace a task which throws exception in result? All in all, idea is of caching result is great, but I think it won't work in this situation with cache and concurrent dictionary. Feel free to look at expected result in my answer with LazyWithoutExceptionsCaching.
    – piotrwest
    Dec 22, 2015 at 22:29
  • I'll update my answer but want to mention that you should not use TryGetValue - you can simply directly call GetOrAdd - it works right the same way.
    – VMAtm
    Dec 23, 2015 at 9:32
  • @piotrwest Oh, I got it! You store the exception, and if it throws, you replace the value? Ok, and what if it throws second time?
    – VMAtm
    Dec 23, 2015 at 9:41
  • @piotrwest No, still didn't understand your concerns regarding the Tasks, I think it will fit.
    – VMAtm
    Dec 23, 2015 at 9:43
  • Ok, I'll update the question to explain a little bit more how it should work. It has pretty reasonable technical requirements and it would be good to know if it can be solved better.
    – piotrwest
    Dec 23, 2015 at 9:54
-2

Better way:

public class SimpleLazy<T> where T : class
{
    private readonly Func<T> valueFactory;
    private T instance;

    public SimpleLazy(Func<T> valueFactory)
    {
        this.valueFactory = valueFactory;
        this.instance = null;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            return LazyInitializer.EnsureInitialized(ref instance, valueFactory);
        }
    }
}
1
  • I don't think so. Although LazyInitializer.EnsureInitialized will only assign instance once, it potentially executes valueFactory() many times - which rather defeats the original purpose. "In the event that multiple threads access this method concurrently, multiple instances of T may be created, but only one will be stored into target and returned" learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/…
    – Phil B
    Mar 10, 2021 at 13:33
-2

Created this class based on @piotrwest as an improvement !

internal class CustomLazy<T> where T : class
{
    private readonly Func<T> _valueFactory;
    private Lazy<T> _lazy;
    private int _counter;

    public T Value => _lazy.Value;

    public CustomLazy( Func<T> valueFactory )
    {
        _valueFactory = valueFactory;
        _counter = 0;            

        _lazy = new Lazy<T>( 
            Create,
            LazyThreadSafetyMode.PublicationOnly 
        );
    }

    private T Create()
    {
        try
        {
            if( Interlocked.Increment( ref _counter ) == 1 )
            {
                return _valueFactory();
            }
            else
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException( );
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            Interlocked.Decrement( ref _counter );
        }
    }
}

Configuring Lazy instance with LazyThreadSafetyMode.PublicationOnly makes it possible to retry until you get your desired value but it also allow for multiple Create functions to be called at the same time. To counter that mechanic I've added a ref counter to allow only one valueFactory to called be at the same time. You should consider using this only where you can manage failure from Value property.

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